Led light and bridge rectifier on 10hp Tecumseh - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
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post #1 of 20 Old 10-31-2016, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
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Led light and bridge rectifier on 10hp Tecumseh

Hi folks new here so please forgive me if this has been covered before.

I have an old Ariens ST1032 with a 2 year old 10hp Tecumseh Snow King motor. There is no battery. I want to mount a single 27w led worklight as a replacement to the old one from back in the stone-age.

I have a single yellow wire with a black sock ending in a single plasic plug sticking out of the motor. I understand that I will need to hook up a bridge rectifier between the light and this wire because it's AC coming from the motor and the LED will need DC.

So here's the wiggle: there are 4 points on a bridge rectifier - 2 for AC and 2 for DC - so how do I hook this up given that I only have 1 AC wire out????

Any help would be appreciated!
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post #2 of 20 Old 10-31-2016, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coyotey View Post
Hi folks new here so please forgive me if this has been covered before.

I have an old Ariens ST1032 with a 2 year old 10hp Tecumseh Snow King motor. There is no battery. I want to mount a single 27w led worklight as a replacement to the old one from back in the stone-age.

I have a single yellow wire with a black sock ending in a single plasic plug sticking out of the motor. I understand that I will need to hook up a bridge rectifier between the light and this wire because it's AC coming from the motor and the LED will need DC.

So here's the wiggle: there are 4 points on a bridge rectifier - 2 for AC and 2 for DC - so how do I hook this up given that I only have 1 AC wire out????

Any help would be appreciated!
the other AC lead would go to ground (i.e. your engine block).

double check that stator output to make sure it's pure AC... set your multimeter to DC and measure the stator output to ground. if you get any DC voltage, then you have a diode in there already (serving as a half-wave rectifier). that diode would have to be removed before installing a bridge (full wave) rectifier.


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post #3 of 20 Old 10-31-2016, 01:30 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by classiccat View Post
the other AC lead would go to ground (i.e. your engine block).

double check that stator output to make sure it's pure AC... set your multimeter to DC and measure the stator output to ground. if you get any DC voltage, then you have a diode in there already (serving as a half-wave rectifier). that diode would have to be removed before installing a bridge (full wave) rectifier.
Thanks Classiccat for your response!

I just measured and I'm getting 14+ on AC at full revs and 0.1-0.2 on DC (so basically zero).

So then I need to get the bridge rectifier - and if I understand correctly, I connect the AC wire from the motor to it's appropriate place on the rectifier and then make a wire to ground from the other AC connection on the rectifier. Then the positive on the LED would connect to the appropriate spot on the rectifier and the other to ground?

Where is the best place to have a switch? Does it make any difference if it goes before or after the rectifier?
Also: what would be the suitable size of rectifier for this motor and for this 27w LED application?

Again, thanks for your insight!
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post #4 of 20 Old 10-31-2016, 01:54 PM
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Water proof rectifier, also has mounting hole. I think jeeps used this so mayb find at autoparts store.

Bridge Rectifier 50 Amp 1-1000 Volt- KBPC50A10 - TMC USA Aluminum Casing | eBay
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post #5 of 20 Old 10-31-2016, 02:52 PM
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Garage
I don't think it would make a difference for which side of the bridge rectifier to put the switch.

I think that any bridge rectifier you find will be adequate for your application. 27W is just under 2A at 14VAC. Were you planning to put any filtering capacitors on the DC side? A full bridge rectified and filtered 14VAC input would be close to 20VDC (ignoring the voltage drop of the two diodes in the rectifier). I'd say any rectifier capable of 5A would do fine. The one scrappy found is overkill, but it's cheap, waterproof and easy to mount, so why not!
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post #6 of 20 Old 11-01-2016, 02:59 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you for your help gentlemen.

Part is orderred and I can't wait to see this LED work. We live so far to the north here in Norway that it gets dark at 2:30-3pm so most of snow clearing happens in pitch dark after work. So, let there be light then!

Cheers!
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post #7 of 20 Old 11-01-2016, 03:07 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardC View Post
I don't think it would make a difference for which side of the bridge rectifier to put the switch.

I think that any bridge rectifier you find will be adequate for your application. 27W is just under 2A at 14VAC. Were you planning to put any filtering capacitors on the DC side? A full bridge rectified and filtered 14VAC input would be close to 20VDC (ignoring the voltage drop of the two diodes in the rectifier). I'd say any rectifier capable of 5A would do fine. The one scrappy found is overkill, but it's cheap, waterproof and easy to mount, so why not!
You mention filtering capacitors on the DC side...what function does this perform? Do I need one?
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post #8 of 20 Old 11-01-2016, 06:20 AM
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that smoothing capacitor takes the rectified sine wave and smooths-out the peaks; in the case of an LED lamp, it will minimize/eliminate any flicker.

you're opening a can of worms adding a switch to this circuit. The no-load voltage can spike very high causing premature failure of your LED lamp.


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post #9 of 20 Old 11-01-2016, 06:48 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by classiccat View Post
that smoothing capacitor takes the rectified sine wave and smooths-out the peaks; in the case of an LED lamp, it will minimize/eliminate any flicker.

you're opening a can of worms adding a switch to this circuit. The no-load voltage can spike very high causing premature failure of your LED lamp.
Is it then best to just drop the switch and let it light constantly? I have only a rudimentary understanding of electronics - wouldn't the no-load current just stop at a turned-off switch - thus not affecting the light?
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post #10 of 20 Old 11-01-2016, 11:43 AM
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Is it then best to just drop the switch and let it light constantly? I have only a rudimentary understanding of electronics - wouldn't the no-load current just stop at a turned-off switch - thus not affecting the light?
That's correct; it's easiest to let that thing shine its butt of even in broad daylight

It's not a matter of current...but rather potential (voltage). You could install a voltage regulator to peg the voltage below the maximum LED voltage however there's no real need for that added cost / complexity.


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