Do Bobcats really go through everything? - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 12-19-2017, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
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Do Bobcats really go through everything?

I've seen YouTube videos of Bobcat blowers going through deep snow not stopping, and throwing well, and the EOD mess doesn't stop them. It seems a lot of Bobcat owners swear by them. Any swear at them? Lol.

Really, are they the non-stop monsters that the message is conveying?

Do they clog with wet snow under the same conditions as other snowblower would?

Or just a snowblower with the same problems when others are having the same problems?

Problem getting parts?

1986 Ariens ST522, 5hp, 22"
1995 Murray Craftsman 10hp, 29" w. 12" impeller
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Noma 9hp, 27" w. 12" impeller
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Gravely Convertible, 12hp Kohler cast iron, 26" width, 600 lbs of cast iron & steel, 2 speed impeller, 4 ground speeds
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post #2 of 6 Old 12-26-2017, 03:56 PM
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Hello Jlawrence; All!

I've been away from the site for awhile, but I still have my trusty Bob-caTs.

They can muscle through quite a lot. Very little stops 'em... short of a mechanical failure, or a very large obstruction, like a piece of firewood, large edging stone, the neighbor's pitbull... etc. Bob-caT's were designed to be very durable for heavy commercial use & most originally started life as such, but by the late 60's/early 70's, "Bob-caT" was a common machine for homeowners w/a few bucks & an eye for durability. A lot of machines were "built-to-last" back then, but most have a bunch proprietary components. Bob-caTs were built-to-last with widely-available industrial-spec bearings and components. ****, the Briggs & Stratton engines were not built to last anywhere near as long as the machine.

Both my 5hp and 7hp Bob-caT's take longer than a newer machine to do the same job, but the trade offs = lower initial cost, capability, and most importantly, overall durability. Your typical new snowblower has a big motor, eats shear pins for breakfast, costs waaaaay too much, and grenade apart when faced with Old Man Winter's worst... Cost Reduction Engineering SUCKS!!!!.

...A Bob-caT/Bear-caT is a solid machine and anyone that has ever owned one in good working order will tell you that they are beasts. That said, a Bob-caT, in good working order, should be able to throw snow anywhere from 10 to 60 feet away or more, and roostertail it about as high, (depending on the engine size and snow type)... Its not out of the ballpark for the larger versions to fire powdery fluff up to 80 feet. The monster tractor-mounted units were essentially two scaled-up versions welded together (two 2nd stage impellers)... incredible pieces of equipment, but god help anyone/thing caught in their way. All Bob-caTs/Bear-Cat/Bear-Paws will consume snow, ice, rocks, and small animals with the 1st stage, then it pulverizes and launches them at high speed with the 2nd. People get mangled by typical snowblowers, but this thing will really maim a person....like "neighbors will be finding chunks of your body parts in the spring" kind of bad. Bone and flesh are no match for that cast iron 2nd stage impeller... think rock crusher. It will take more than a finger off.

When dealing with heavy-wet snow, ye olde Bob-caT will bang right on through it, without clogging....wet snow, frozen/packed snowbanks, & shrubbery are no match, but you do need to give the impellers time to chew their food... otherwise the forward drive will over-run the machine's ability to throw snow, causing it to plow &/or climb the snow. Sometimes that plowing effect can be handy because it aids in quicker area clearing,... then you can chuck the snowpiles out into the yard... (depends on how familiar you are with the machine, it can be a good tactic). The 2nd stage thrower's chute throat can clog, but only if its really, really sloppy... you'd have to be cleaning big melt/slushy puddles from the side of the road or trying to removing snow in the rain.

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post #3 of 6 Old 12-26-2017, 03:57 PM
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I swore at mine but mostly because it was a beast to handle. The all-inline design makes for a very long unit -- that impeller is a long ways away from the handlebars. Made it cumbersome to lift/turn.

As far as handling snow/wet stuff, it was far better at snow than wet stuff. I tended to use it as a plow if the snow was slush. EoD was never a problem other than the front end tending to ride up on top of it instead of staying down and digging in.

Unit-specific parts I assume are nonexistent these days. Most of the stuff is fairly generic however; I wouldn't hesitate to buy one due to parts concerns.
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post #4 of 6 Old 12-26-2017, 04:15 PM
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Originally Posted by wdb View Post
I swore at mine but mostly because it was a beast to handle. The all-inline design makes for a very long unit -- that impeller is a long ways away from the handlebars. Made it cumbersome to lift/turn.

As far as handling snow/wet stuff, it was far better at snow than wet stuff. I tended to use it as a plow if the snow was slush. EoD was never a problem other than the front end tending to ride up on top of it instead of staying down and digging in.

Unit-specific parts I assume are nonexistent these days. Most of the stuff is fairly generic however; I wouldn't hesitate to buy one due to parts concerns.
^^^ LOL, yeah, it can be a pain to manuever in tight areas, but Im used to it I guess. Only time I swear at mine is when something gives up the ghost, but I expect worn old to parts fail... I replaced a bunch of things, made some upgrades to the original engine, and keep her greased.... So long as I do that, she'll outlast me.

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post #5 of 6 Old 01-12-2018, 06:27 PM
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Hey Al. I just used mine for the 1st time this winter. It is definitely a keeper being lighter than my S7 or Noma 10/33-I'll be 72 in the Spring so light is good. It would appear that my earlier idea of Tecumseh h10 swap wouldn't fit the chassis mounts. Mine does bog a bit under load but I don't like wot on my toys-maybe just let it rev. Just wondering what you did to your engine. A bit of trivia-when I'm out riding on one of my cycles there is a Bobcat tiller along one of the regular roads I hit.
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post #6 of 6 Old 01-24-2018, 03:00 PM
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Hi... when my dad got his bobcat in the early 60s, that beast would go thru almost anything that a north jersey winter could dish out. Plowed in and frozen driveways, did give it pause, however letting the beast "nibble" its way thru instead of trying to have it power thru worked. Once my uncle got impatient and hit a frozen snow bank on a running start... yes something broke. It got fixed and worked for years after that.
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