Winter Gloves Needed. - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 06:56 PM Thread Starter
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Winter Gloves Needed.

I'm a mailman and all winter long I wear a pair of disposable blue gloves. They actually keep my hands warm enough and my knuckles don't get beat up by the constant banging on mailboxes and doors. With 550 houses on my route, you can just imagine how beat up my knuckles could get. They do the job and I couldn't get anything thicker because I still need the finger dexterity. The average January/February temps here are lows around 20 and high mid 30's so we tend to get a lot of thick, wet snow.

When shoveling or blowing snow I obviously need better gloves. The blue gloves work fine when it's dry but if you get any snow on them then you get cold real quick. lol For the past few years I've actually worn the blue gloves under a pair of cheap winter gloves but I know there are better options.

As I said, the temps will usually be hovering around the freezing mark when I'm blowing/shoveling and my new machine does have heated grips. I'd really only be using the gloves when taking care of my driveway. Any suggestions?
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 07:00 PM
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If you're going to run the heated grips, you can get away with just about any glove. The heated grips give off quite a bit of warmth, sometimes it's almost too much.

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post #3 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 07:04 PM
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I've been using SnowMobile Mittens like these "Mountain Tops" for the past 10 years:



https://www.walmart.com/ip/CTM-Water...iner/122292534

If your fingers don't have any independent work to do, why let them chill out separately ?

Last edited by Vermont007; 01-09-2017 at 07:14 PM.
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 07:06 PM
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Any good ski glove should serve you well, your local Costco will usually have a good pair for about $25-$30.

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post #5 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by uberT View Post
If you're going to run the heated grips, you can get away with just about any glove. The heated grips give off quite a bit of warmth, sometimes it's almost too much.
I agree, with heated grips, I don't think you'll need much more than a thin pair of gloves. I don't have heated grips, but I would guess that any snow that gets on them would melt, so I'd go with something that's waterproof.

For me, I have a pair of Wells Lamont gloves I got at Costco that are very warm. I can't remember how much I paid, but they look exactly like these: https://www.farmandfleet.com/product...aS4aAsrI8P8HAQ

However, I have a pair of surplus military gloves that have a separate trigger finger on the way on the way in the mail. It has a separate wool blend liner with a mitten upper.




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post #6 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 08:26 PM
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Best gloves I have used . Keeps hand nice and dry and warm . http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTAwMVgxMDAx/z/NTYAAOSwk5FUynXU/$_57.JPG?set_id=880000500F


Do a search for atlas snowblower gloves
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-09-2017, 08:42 PM
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My wife got me heated (battery) glove liners, they are thin so they fit in anything, i use them in big thick snowmobile gloves to thin cold weather mechanics gloves.


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post #8 of 11 Old 01-10-2017, 08:36 AM
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Harbor Freight has insulated work gloves with textured padding for less than $15
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-10-2017, 10:34 AM
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I have had Raynaud's syndrome for about 25 plus years now. I found out years ago that mittens are the best for throwing and shoveling, but the down side of using mittens is that when you sweat and they get wet inside, it takes a long... time to dry them out.

So I tried going back to gloves a few years ago because of the easier way of drying them in the dryer and gloves are a lot easier to do things with. I must have toughened up over the last few years of using the gloves, because I found out that I am doing okay while snow throwing and shoveling.

What I am using are those cheap cotton, white or yellow working gloves with the red wrist band. I turn them inside out so that I do not feel the stitching rubbing in to my hands. This does make then feel a bit more comfortable on your hands. I probably get a season to a season and a half out of one pair. But I buy the 3 or 6 count package. The longer I try to keep them dry the better off I am. But what I found out is, if I keep the blood pumping, I stay warmer. If I stop, it becomes brutal.

I can not wear any type of rubbery kind of glove, because the rubber seems to attract the cold right to your hands.
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-10-2017, 11:20 AM
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Just bought a pair of Carhart winter gloves. They came with a thin glove liner that I use in another pair of fleece gloves. The Carharts are great the gauntlet style keeps the blowing snow off my wrists. About $30 in an Army/Navy store.
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