Salt Dissolving Sprays - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 02-25-2017, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
drmerdp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 1,287
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 6
Thanks (Received): 142
Likes (Given): 24
Likes (Received): 293
Salt Dissolving Sprays

Anyone mess around with salt dissolving sprays for cleaning cars, plows, and snowblowers?

There are commercially available concentrates such as salt-a-way, salt-x, salt-off.

And the homemade variants

Vinegar, little car soap, and water in a spray bottle.
Baking soda, little car soap, water " " "

Honda HSS1328AATD | Honda HS720 | Toro Powerlite | Simplicity 860se


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
drmerdp is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 02-25-2017, 07:11 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Lowell area, MA
Posts: 3,246
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 118
Thanks (Received): 277
Likes (Given): 358
Likes (Received): 633
To be honest, I didn't even know these were a thing How are they different/better than just water?

If I was trying to get off salt at the end of the season, I'd probably just spray it with a hose, but I've never given it a lot of thought.

Ariens 1024 Pro
Toro Power Clear 221QR
Toro Power Curve 1800
RedOctobyr is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 02-25-2017, 07:58 PM
Senior Member
 
The_Geologist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Montana
Posts: 138
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 6
Thanks (Received): 4
Likes (Given): 41
Likes (Received): 16
Garage
Looks like they are mostly water, with a bit of corrosion inhibitor and "buffering agents" added. The SDS for Salt-X shows the pH as 5.06, which is a little acidic, but not that bad.

It it were me, I'd still use water for a rinse, if possible, then a bit of WD-40 for keeping rust at bay until a thorough cleaning/lubing/rust protecting in the spring.

Adam
Flathead Valley, MT

1980 Ariens ST824
1990s Toro CCR1000
The_Geologist is online now  
post #4 of 11 Old 02-25-2017, 09:13 PM
Senior Member
 
524SWE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: CNY USA
Posts: 270
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 0
Thanks (Received): 9
Likes (Given): 1
Likes (Received): 23
I just hose mine off and use this stuff on them, seems to work well and doesn't hurt paint or plastic.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	87769884-3dc3-43c5-839e-93ec374af797_1.bb223f08f52278a29747daca6c4ddbf3.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	18.4 KB
ID:	100778  
524SWE is offline  
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes Prime liked this post
post #5 of 11 Old 02-26-2017, 05:04 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 354
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 28
Thanks (Received): 25
Likes (Given): 180
Likes (Received): 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by 524SWE View Post
I just hose mine off and use this stuff on them, seems to work well and doesn't hurt paint or plastic.
I also use fluid film on my blowers / mower decks and hedge trimmer blades. I buy in bulk by the gallon and apply with an undercoat gun.
Prime is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 02-26-2017, 06:58 AM
Senior Member
 
tpenfield's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,040
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 48
Thanks (Received): 56
Likes (Given): 127
Likes (Received): 190
Garage
I use Salt-Away on my outboard boat motors . . . It dissolves salt and minerals very well. A bit pricey to be using on a snow blower though. Not sure it is really needed, given the relatively low concentration of salt that might remain on a snow blower after its use.

Regards, Ted
.
Current & Past Fleet:
2017 Husqvarna ST224 (SOLD)
2014 Troy-Bilt 2410 w/ Briggs & Stratton 305cc Engine
2003 Ariens ST824LE (SOLD)
1999 Toro PowerShift 824 w/ 318cc OHV Tecumseh Engine
1988 Toro 521 w/ 212cc Predator Engine
1985 Toro 3521 w/ 179cc Powermore Engine (SOLD)
tpenfield is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 02-26-2017, 09:05 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
drmerdp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Northern NJ
Posts: 1,287
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 6
Thanks (Received): 142
Likes (Given): 24
Likes (Received): 293
Fluid film has been talk a lot about, I'm going to have to try it out. I've noticed quite a bit of surface corrosion and a salty film on my Honda aluminum components. I've owned it for two years and have never gave it a good wash or sprayed any rust inhibitor. My plan is to give it a good cleaning before I put it into storage.

Honda HSS1328AATD | Honda HS720 | Toro Powerlite | Simplicity 860se


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
drmerdp is offline  
post #8 of 11 Old 02-26-2017, 10:27 AM
Super Moderator
 
sscotsman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Western NY, USA
Posts: 3,660
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 61
Thanks (Received): 336
Likes (Given): 148
Likes (Received): 762
Yeah, for snowblower use, IMO these kinds of products are a solution without a problem..
I do live in a "heavy salt use" area..in the winter, our roads are often bright white with salt residue..
but I always do three things with the snowblower to minimize salt impact:

1. Always clear EOD first, because that is the snow that contains all the salt, then after that is done do the rest of the driveway which is "clean" snow, straight from the sky..that clears out all the salty snow.

2. Always brush off the excess snow when i'm done using the snowblower.

3. Rinse down thoroughly with a hose in the spring..there will be no salt left at that point.

I see no need for any of those products..

Scot


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
sscotsman is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 02-26-2017, 11:57 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 267
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 10
Thanks (Received): 15
Likes (Given): 16
Likes (Received): 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sscotsman View Post
Yeah, for snowblower use, IMO these kinds of products are a solution without a problem..
I do live in a "heavy salt use" area..in the winter, our roads are often bright white with salt residue..
but I always do three things with the snowblower to minimize salt impact:

1. Always clear EOD first, because that is the snow that contains all the salt, then after that is done do the rest of the driveway which is "clean" snow, straight from the sky..that clears out all the salty snow.

2. Always brush off the excess snow when i'm done using the snowblower.

3. Rinse down thoroughly with a hose in the spring..there will be no salt left at that point.

I see no need for any of those products..

Scot
WD40 is basically the same thing and will work well. I disagree straight water will not remove salt and the other chemicals they use on the roads now. If you hose your car down with a hose without using soap, you still see the salt left over. So what I do is hit my machine with wd40 liberally everywhere after use. That pretty well covers it. Plus waiting all the way until spring too hose it off is a bad idea, it gives the salt a lot of time to eat away at the corrosive metal. Its best to hit the machine with wd40 the next day. I waited a week one time and I could see the rust already building. Salt and those chemicals they put down on the road are the worst thing for under-bodies of cars, snowblowers, any machine made of metal and metal itself. It has to be hit with that stuff right away or it will start rusting and corroding fast and you definitely need more than just water. If you going too use water, I would spray it down with purple power first then hit it with the hose. I would still spray it with wd40 or an anti rust lubricant after for sure, especially the auger and the belly, thats where the rust builds and sits the worst, in the bucket, basically you want everything lubricated with the anti rust, especially all areas that don't have paint, nuts bolts, in and on the chute, the worm gear and gears, all the bolts, the chrome lined handle bars, muffler and engine component's the rims, tire chains need it for sure, I'm sure I missed many spots, basically anything you see that can be rusted up, you want to spray down with wd40. The 20 oz can of wd40 for 8 bucks will save you hundreds of dollars or more down the road, as you are saving the machine from rotting away. Especially the newer thin made metal machines, but even the old solid thick metal machine's need it. WD40 is your best friend in this situation.

Last edited by FearlessFront; 02-26-2017 at 12:03 PM.
FearlessFront is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 02-26-2017, 04:11 PM
Senior Member
 
dbert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Utah
Posts: 1,495
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 32
Thanks (Received): 132
Likes (Given): 200
Likes (Received): 283
WD40 in gallon size is $21.00 at Home Depot. That's 10 times the amount in one 12 ounce can.
dbert is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome