Please use your Snow blower Safely - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 06:35 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Beverly,MA
Posts: 654
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 19
Thanks (Received): 48
Likes (Given): 107
Likes (Received): 221
Please use your Snow blower Safely

During this past storm in Massachusetts , there was a rash of snowblower injuries. Please, turn off the machine, use a stick to clear obstructions, never ever stick your hand into the snow blower whether it's running or not. Please be careful and remain safe.

This was reported by local news agencies:


At least 12 people in Massachusetts were taken to a hospital after sticking their hands in snowblowers during the storm that walloped New England Monday and Tuesday.

One person went to the emergency room on Monday, and at least six went Tuesday, said Dan Marra, a spokesman for Lahey Hospital & Medical Center Emergency Department in Burlington.


UMass Medical Center – University Campus in Worcester saw three patients for snowblower-related injuries over the past two days. St. Vincent hospitals in Worcester saw one case, a spokesperson confirmed.

Baystate Medical Center in Springfield saw one patient with a snowblower-related injury, said spokesman Keith J. O’Connor.

“With each winter storm, we unfortunately see many devastating hand and finger injuries from snow blower accidents,” Pranay Parikh, a doctor at Baystate Plastic Surgery.

Massachusetts General Hospital reported no snowblower-related injuries Tuesday afternoon, but Ali Raja, a doctor and vice chair of emergency medicine, said the hospital saw at least three patients showing symptoms of a heart attack after shoveling snow.


MassGeneral News

@MassGeneralNews
In keeping with tradition, we offer the following reminder on behalf of our ED staff: Please, please, please never stick hands in snowblowers! Thank you.

62
10:59 AM - Dec 3, 2019
Twitter Ads info and privacy
20 people are talking about this
In Lawrence, firefighters freed a man from his snowblower after his hand got stuck. They sent him to the hospital and shoveled his driveway, Fire Chief Brian Moriarty said. It is unclear which hospital he visited.

“Please don’t stick your hand in a snowblower,” the chief wrote.

Last edited by russ01915; 12-04-2019 at 06:59 AM.
russ01915 is offline  
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Thanks SayItAintSnow thanked for this post
Likes gibbs296 liked this post
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 07:02 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Beverly,MA
Posts: 654
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 19
Thanks (Received): 48
Likes (Given): 107
Likes (Received): 221
russ01915 is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 07:12 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Beverly,MA
Posts: 654
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 19
Thanks (Received): 48
Likes (Given): 107
Likes (Received): 221
By Elaine Thompson
Telegram & Gazette Staff

Posted Dec 2, 2019 at 9:03 PM
Updated Dec 3, 2019 at 7:00 AM

If your snowblower gets clogged, DO NOT stick your hand in to unclog it - even if it is turned off - because you chance getting fingers or your hand mangled or amputated, experts advise.

There were at least four such cases seen at UMass Medical Center – University Campus and St. Vincent hospitals in Worcester on Monday, the first snow day of the season. Each year, there are approximately 5,000 injuries related to snowblowers, including lacerations and over-exertion injuries, nationwide according to the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission. The number of the preventable injuries vary from year to year, including more than 9,000 in 2010 and 2014.

Dr. Ari Nalbandian, an emergency medicine physician, practicing at UMass Memorial Medical Center, University campus in Worcester and at the Marlboro campus, said when there is a snow storm, he typically sees three to five snow-blower related injuries a day. By early afternoon Monday, two patients had been brought to UMass and a third was being transported there from another hospital. St. Vincent reported seeing one patient for a snowblower injury, as well as one for hypothermia.

“Don’t stick your hand in the snowblower no matter what,” Dr. Nalbandian strongly advised. “You would think that’s like common sense. But, people do it every year.”

According to police and fire officials on Monday, a woman on Dolan Road in Millbury suffered a finger injury while using a snow blower. A man on Perry Street in Auburn suffered a hand injury while cleaning his snowblower. A Townsend Street man in Pepperell, about seven miles from Townsend, suffered a significant finger injury from his snowblower.

“We have at least one or two each year where someone sticks their hand in to unclog it and have some sort of hand injury,” Auburn Deputy Fire Chief Glenn Johnson said.

Even if the snowblower is turned off, injuries can occur. Dr. Nalbandian said a couple of years ago, he tended to a woman who lost three fingers after sticking her hand into a snowblower to unclog it.

“People turn it off and think it’s safe. But the blade that spins can store up some energy and when you relieve the obstruction, it can be released by a surge of energy. The blade spins faster than your reaction time,” the physician said. “The typical story is, ‘Something got stuck in it. I turned it off and unstuck it. Then the thing spun and caught my finger.’”

Newer snowblowers come with a small shovel that is specifically for clearing clogs. If no such device is included, experts say you can use an ordinary stick to clear out snow.


When someone sustains a laceration, they should hold pressure on it to minimize bleeding and call 911. If a digit is completely amputated, wrap it with wet guaze and put it in a plastic bag on ice and bring it with you to the medical center. Never put the finger itself directly on ice. But, the prognosis for successful attachment is not good, Dr. Nalbandian noted.

“The likelihood that they will be replanted is pretty low,” he said. “If it’s not an essential finger on a dominant hand or depending on how mangled or how long since the injury, most usually don’t get put back on. People can definitely lose fingers and have them amputated from these injuries.”

Dr. Nalbandian also recommended that snowblower operators wear goggles to prevent eye injuries caused by pebbles or other debris being propelled by the machine. He said it is also smart to wear earplugs or other devices to prevent hearing damage from the loud sound of the motor.
russ01915 is offline  
post #4 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 07:58 AM
Senior Member
 
orangputeh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: lake tahoe
Posts: 4,644
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 762
Thanks (Received): 235
Likes (Given): 1581
Likes (Received): 1668
Garage
happened to me but just a scratch. shut off blower cause something clogged in impeller . used stick as much as possible and almost had it . Had gloves on and heavy jacket. Got obstruction out and just like the article said there was some built up energy on the impeller.

all the impeller snapped was less than a half turn . ONE auger tooth went thru my heavy jacket into my arm and just barely scratched it and it bled a little.

scared the beejeeeeejus out of me.........never again.

"It Feels Like Beer O'Clock "
orangputeh is online now  
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 2 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes russ01915, classiccat liked this post
post #5 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 08:06 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: Ridgway Colorado
Posts: 112
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 0
Thanks (Received): 15
Likes (Given): 0
Likes (Received): 46
Garage
My vote is to allow natural selection to run it's course. Let nature weed out the weak and stupid just like every other species in nature. The truth is alarming posts about stupid people do not deter the rest of the stupid people because they are not smart enough to pay attention to the obvious. This thread could be replaced with a simple phrase, don't do anything stupid... Sticking a body part into a jammed up machine is likely to net you a negative result. If this fact alludes your consciousness you should just stay away from machinery period. The big problem with trying to save everybody from everything is that those people breed and spread the stupidity. Just allow nature to work it's magic and spare me the OBVIOUS warnings that are already plastered on everything I buy...

Ariens 1027le
Meyer 8' Stainless Lot Pro fitted to 2012 F250
17 Arctic Cat Mtn Cat, for the day after
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Brent Holm is offline  
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes Davejb liked this post
post #6 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 08:40 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 267
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 24
Thanks (Received): 30
Likes (Given): 45
Likes (Received): 138
O.K......I'll bite. And ask the question that may be on the minds of many others here, but are afraid to ask.
But first, I of course agree with all the other warnings about the use of snowblowers. These things should be obvious, but sometimes (like in most types of accidents), people are tired, frustrated, etc. and just respond to a situation without thinking about the possible consequences, and it is tragic, yet understandable how these accidents can happen.

But I have to ask:
I have heard for years that you shouldn't stick your hands in the auger housing even after the machine is off because energy stored in the impeller can cause the impeller to spin, representing a danger. So, in what mechanism is the energy (torque in this case) stored? If the engine is off and the auger is disengaged, where exactly does the residual rotational energy reside? Some part or parts, somewhere between the auger bucket pulley and the augers themselves would have to have enough "spring" to them in order to store any significant amount of this energy--- so where is it exactly? (We're talking about a typical two stage here, BTW.....).

A serious question. Keep in mind I'm not disputing anyone's claims about this phenomenon, just like an explanation if anyone can provide it, because at first glance at least, it seems mechanically illogical.

Thanks!
.
.

If you're looking for guarantees in life, buy yourself a toaster.
--- Clint Eastwood
SayItAintSnow is offline  
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 2 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes russ01915, Sgthawker liked this post
post #7 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 10:50 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wilmington, MA
Posts: 879
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 11
Thanks (Received): 111
Likes (Given): 19
Likes (Received): 311
I've been wondering exactly the same thing... interested to hear if anyone has any answers.

If the auger drive were engaged I could see engine compression possibly supplying some force, or belt stretch. But worst case I can't see those things moving the impeller more than a small fraction of a turn. Doing the math... compression can move the engine a maximum of 1/2 turn. If the reduction from engine to auger is 3.5:1 (typical for engine RPM = 3600 and impeller RPM = 1000), that means maximum 1/7 of a turn of the impeller. I suppose on a 6-blade impeller that is close to a full blade.

Maybe the real question is how much impeller rotation is needed to sever a finger, and I suppose the answer is "not much, under the right circumstances".

~1994 Ariens 924084 (ST1032) "papa bear": restored, re-engined, real nice!
1991 Ariens 924050 (ST824) "mama bear"
Toro PowerCurve 1800 "baby bear"

Be alert! America needs more lerts.
ELaw is offline  
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes SayItAintSnow liked this post
post #8 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 10:58 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Gettysburg, Penna
Posts: 424
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 2
Thanks (Received): 28
Likes (Given): 142
Likes (Received): 57
Garage
Always remember rule #1.... Always!

Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier!!
2019 Ariens Compact 24...
2013 Craftsman 22" 179cc better than shoveling
XM -1000, galvanized steel Shovel with gator grip tape....
Big Bad Kubota as a backup by neighbor.....
penna stogey is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 11:41 AM
JnC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 902
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 69
Thanks (Received): 144
Likes (Given): 27
Likes (Received): 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by russ01915 View Post



FREAKING DAVE!!! I know this guy all too well, works at MIT lincoln labs here in Bedford/Lexington, see him almost every other day at work, glad he didnt loose the hand.
JnC is offline  
Post Thanks / Like - 0 Thanks, 1 Likes, 0 Dislikes
Likes classiccat liked this post
post #10 of 11 Old 12-04-2019, 12:40 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 662
Post Thanks / Like
Thanks (Given): 3
Thanks (Received): 28
Likes (Given): 0
Likes (Received): 108
You brought up the most important word to remember in your post. The word "Tired"... Good job...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SayItAintSnow View Post
O.K......I'll bite. And ask the question that may be on the minds of many others here, but are afraid to ask.
But first, I of course agree with all the other warnings about the use of snowblowers. These things should be obvious, but sometimes (like in most types of accidents), people are tired, frustrated, etc. and just respond to a situation without thinking about the possible consequences, and it is tragic, yet understandable how these accidents can happen.

But I have to ask:
I have heard for years that you shouldn't stick your hands in the auger housing even after the machine is off because energy stored in the impeller can cause the impeller to spin, representing a danger. So, in what mechanism is the energy (torque in this case) stored? If the engine is off and the auger is disengaged, where exactly does the residual rotational energy reside? Some part or parts, somewhere between the auger bucket pulley and the augers themselves would have to have enough "spring" to them in order to store any significant amount of this energy--- so where is it exactly? (We're talking about a typical two stage here, BTW.....).

A serious question. Keep in mind I'm not disputing anyone's claims about this phenomenon, just like an explanation if anyone can provide it, because at first glance at least, it seems mechanically illogical.

Thanks!
.
.
Kielbasa is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome