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Thread: How long is it safe to let gas sit in carb? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-20-2018 06:50 AM
HCBPH
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunlight99 View Post
Toro manual says to drain the fuel in the carburetor after running the engine dry, is that needed?
Can't hurt, particularly if you have a metal tank, don't treat your gas or use ethanol fuel. I think you'll find manufacturers will lean to the side of caution especially if there's a warranty involved.
02-20-2018 01:00 AM
sunlight99 Toro manual says to drain the fuel in the carburetor after running the engine dry, is that needed?
02-19-2018 08:50 PM
jrcjr I didn't believe it myself, but here's pretty much the final word until someone suggests something else and different testing is done. (i.e. New hypothesis, new testing and observation, etc)

NIST - National Institute of Standards and Time (Kinda like the CDC or NIH, but for things that involve physics, chemistry, or other sciences that don't involve a human body.)

https://www.nist.gov/news-events/new...tank-retrofits
02-18-2018 04:10 PM
barney
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony P. View Post
While ethanol can cause serious problems from phase separation, ethanol-free gasoline can still cause problems due to oxidation, often called stale fuel. Gasoline (with ethanol or ethanol-free) is inherently unstable and that instability causes it to degrade soon after refining. Much of the degradation of gasoline is caused by oxidation. Stale fuel causes gum and varnish - sticky substances that cling to everything causing clogs and eventual failure to the carburetor and engine.

Oxidation has been around for as long as gasoline but is generally not a critical problem in sealed fuel systems, such as vehicles. However, today's small engine fuel systems are not sealed - their gas tanks are vented, as are many gas cans. As a result, oxidation can occur fairly quickly - beginning in as little as 30 days, particularly if the gas tank or can is kept less than half full.

Gasoline additives can control or diminish oxidation, which is why they should be used in all gasolines for small engines.

BTW, I'm not familiar with a NAPA brand additive.
Excellent info. Thank you. Maybe it wasn't a NAPA brand. It was a small bottle I bought at Napa.
02-18-2018 02:04 PM
broo For my part, I use non-ethanol 91 octane fuel with stabilizer and Marvel Mystery Oil (don't know if it helps or not, but I got a 6 pack of the stuff I have to somehow use). I have no fuel shutoff valve on any of my OPE and I don't drain the carbs since I don't know how. No problems yet with neither winter or summer equipment.

HCBPH, my guess about the blue fuel would be that someone used Stabil Marine in it. That stuff is blue.
02-18-2018 07:59 AM
HCBPH I ran into something new last night. I bought a machine for the engine and started tearing it down. It had about a half tank of gas in it, no big deal -right? I usually drain the tank and let it evaporate. Surprise Surprise - the fuel was blue like it had some brand of stabilizer in it. That wasn't the real surprise, there was ice in the tank. Not just a little, a lot. Unless they had water in the gas can, I've never seen anything like that before.

Just a comment.
02-17-2018 09:53 PM
crazzywolfie
Quote:
Originally Posted by tadawson View Post
Yeah, I wasn't recommending 15 years . . . But then again, I think 30 days is crazy short. The mower I mentioned (Honda) is from 1989, never needed cleaning, and often sees multi month old fuel from over the winter, without issue. On the mower (unlike the blowers) I am sadly hit or miss on draining it or running it dry. I do fuel up just prior to use, so rarely get full tank of old fuel . . .

(Note that this is just my experience, which may well amount to nothing in other environments, and I'm certainly not recommending it . . . just sharing an observation).
i am pretty sure that is what most manuals say. if you are not using it for more than 30 days to drain it. i could possibly see it being true. the smaller the amount of fuel the quicker the reaction happens especially when dealing with something the size of a float bowl. storage definitely has a huge effect on that too. storing a machine in a garage would help the fuel last longer than sitting out in the sun/weather all the time.

i personally spend the bit extra with my carbed engines and get the shell premium fuel which is luckily ethanol free around me. ever since the switch years ago it has saved me the yearly clean the carb out. i know i have even had a few people tell me the 2 stroke oil is suppose to help the fuel stay longer but my 2 strokes still had issues with the ethanol in the fuel.
02-17-2018 06:42 PM
Tony P.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbert View Post
I don't believe a meaningful connection has been made that gasoline + ethanol + bacteria = corrosion in small engines. While it's true Acetobacter produced corrosion in a laboratory setting around 10 years ago and there is a real possibility for very dirty industrial equipment to attract the bacteria, that seems to me to be a long way from definitively making this connection.

To my knowledge Acetobacter has not been found inside engines or components and it would be good if someone would dispute that. I'm ready to stand corrected.

I'm not saying ethanol phase separation can't lead to corrosion in small engines; only that that process has nothing to do with bacteria.

Acetobacter is commonly used in fermentation (primarily vinegar) which is a long way from small engines.
02-17-2018 05:27 PM
dbert And...
Quote:
Ethanol attracts water. When the two get together, they create the perfect environment to grow a type of bacteria called acetobacter. After getting drunk on their EPA-sponsored kegger in your gas tank, the acetobacter excrete acetic acid. And acetic acid is very corrosive.

If youíre refilling your gas tank every week or two, acetobacter donít have time to grow a sufficient size colony to damage metal parts in your fuel system. But if your fuel sits for longer periods of time these microorganisms continue to multiply until your gas tank contains damaging levels of acetic acid.
https://www.equipmentworld.com/e-10-...our-fuel-pump/
02-17-2018 04:07 PM
Tony P. While ethanol can cause serious problems from phase separation, ethanol-free gasoline can still cause problems due to oxidation, often called stale fuel. Gasoline (with ethanol or ethanol-free) is inherently unstable and that instability causes it to degrade soon after refining. Much of the degradation of gasoline is caused by oxidation. Stale fuel causes gum and varnish - sticky substances that cling to everything causing clogs and eventual failure to the carburetor and engine.

Oxidation has been around for as long as gasoline but is generally not a critical problem in sealed fuel systems, such as vehicles. However, today's small engine fuel systems are not sealed - their gas tanks are vented, as are many gas cans. As a result, oxidation can occur fairly quickly - beginning in as little as 30 days, particularly if the gas tank or can is kept less than half full.

Gasoline additives can control or diminish oxidation, which is why they should be used in all gasolines for small engines.

BTW, I'm not familiar with a NAPA brand additive.
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