Can over-inflation stretch tires so they won't seal at the bead? - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
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post #1 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
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Can over-inflation stretch tires so they won't seal at the bead?

I have an old Honda snowblower that I bought used and has the original tires on it. In the two years I've owned it, one tire has always had a slow leak despite putting in Slime. Also, I've been inflating the tubeless tires to only 8 psi as Honda recommends, but I've always found that the blower has been difficult to turn.

So in getting the blower ready for winter a few weeks ago, I thought I'd inflate the tires to their max listed pressure: 17 PSI. Thought that may help with the turning and keep my from having to refill the slowly leaking tire as often.

I don't know if my inflation gauge is off, but when I inflated them to 17 PSI, the outer sidewalls were bulging way out, so I quickly deflated them a bit until they weren't bulging out.

Fast forward to today, when we got hit with our first snowstorm of the season. I go out to start the snowblower and the tire with the slow leak was completely empty and the tire was pulled away from the rim. By using a few people and multiple hands to push the tire against the rim so it would take air (I didn't know about the ratchet strap trick at the time) we were able to slightly inflate the tire and have it connect to the rim (at less than 8 psi). But it wasn't enough air to support the snow blower. So then I added more air and the tire bead would just slip off the rim. We tried a few more times and same thing. Even tried the ratchet strap trick, and that didn't work ... the tire still slips off the rim when inflated.

Now I'm thinking my inflation gauge was off and I stretched the tires too much by over-inflating them. And since I can easily pull the deflated tire off the rim by hand (don't need tools) is that a sign that the tire rubber is stretched out too much and I really need to buy new tires?

Last edited by Studly; 11-27-2019 at 06:20 PM.
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post #2 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 05:47 PM
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New Tires ….

I think the least amount of air I have ever seen for a small tire was 12 lbs … many are in the 20 lb. range.

Those tires sure appear to be toast. The ratchet works well on tubeless tires when inflating them if it wont conform to the rim.

If your doing it yourself, I recommend the Harbor Freight mini tire changer. Otherwise take the tires somewhere to have them mounted, as they are very tough without that mini changer.
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post #3 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 06:23 PM
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The old Honda used a two piece rim that you just split and took the tire off by hand.
The tires on the old Honda only took about 8 psi max or you would blow it off if the bead ring that is in the tire. You can put the ring back in the tire, but a lot of times if you blow it off due to over inflation, the tire is shot.
The original tires used a special low pressure gauge to check pressure in them. A regular tire gauge wont work, it doesnt go low enough. 10 psi is the high limit on those tires.
Those Ohatsu tires were just an inner tube with knobby tread on them, there was no cord built in the tires so they stretched out like crazy but the were very flexible in cold weather.
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post #4 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ST1100A View Post
The old Honda used a two piece rim that you just split and took the tire off by hand.
The tires on the old Honda only took about 8 psi max or you would blow it off if the bead ring that is in the tire. You can put the ring back in the tire, but a lot of times if you blow it off due to over inflation, the tire is shot.
The original tires used a special low pressure gauge to check pressure in them. A regular tire gauge wont work, it doesnt go low enough. 10 psi is the high limit on those tires.
Those Ohatsu tires were just an inner tube with knobby tread on them, there was no cord built in the tires so they stretched out like crazy but the were very flexible in cold weather.

Yup, that would explain my problems then! And they are the Ohatsu tires. Thanks for the info. Any suggestions on replacement tires and the best place to buy them at a good price?
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post #5 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 07:17 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by oneacer View Post
New Tires ….

I think the least amount of air I have ever seen for a small tire was 12 lbs … many are in the 20 lb. range.

Those tires sure appear to be toast. The ratchet works well on tubeless tires when inflating them if it wont conform to the rim.

If your doing it yourself, I recommend the Harbor Freight mini tire changer. Otherwise take the tires somewhere to have them mounted, as they are very tough without that mini changer.

Thanks for the info. I think new tires are in my future!
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post #6 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Studly View Post
Yup, that would explain my problems then! And they are the Ohatsu tires. Thanks for the info. Any suggestions on replacement tires and the best place to buy them at a good price?
You are welcome.
You will blow the tires off their beads and off the rims at 15 PSI.
Those tires have a removable wire type bead in them.
I put tires on those rims that are for a smaller walk-behind garden tiller with the Chevron treads and they work very well in snow with no chains required, and I only run them with about 10 PSI.
You don't need much pressure for snowblower tires to get the traction.
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post #7 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 08:00 PM
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What is the rim size? , i.e. width and circumference.

Is there a size on those Ohatsu tires that you can read?

Are those split rims with a tube, or are they a tubeless rim?

With that information, you will be able to get a nice new pair of XTrax or SnowHog tires.
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post #8 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 08:05 PM
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Normal automotive tires have quite hard/strong wire running around the bead area and that wouldn't stretch. Are you saying the tire bead goes over the rim or it just sinks to the inside area? I'd say if there is nylon in the tire carcass that you stretched it or something inside has ripped. The rubber just holds the air in, the plys inside the tire are what give it shape and hold it together.
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post #9 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 08:22 PM
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notabiker,
The bead is actually a plastic ring on those tires. The tire is nothing more than an inner tube with knobby treads on it, there is no cord or belting on those tires, they are very flimsy, but flexible, too flexible.
You can remove the bead ring on those tires, it just sits in a groove in the tire itself.
The wheel on the older Honda was a two piece rim that had to be split in half to remove and install the new tires on.
They were actually very easy to change the tires on. There is a rubber "O" ring that is located between the two rim half's, and if you damage the O ring, it will leak the air out.
Those tires were very low pressure, they usually ran around 8-10 PSI max, if you put 15 PSI in them , you would blow them off the rim. First they would blow off the bead ring and then stretch out and come off the wheel/rim. You could actually stretch the tire over the bead by hand if you had to as long as the tire bead ring came out of the inside of the tire.
Honda stopped using those tires years ago because everybody was over inflating them and blowing them off the wheel rims.
They are tubeless tires, just like any other tubeless tire but have no belting or cording inside them so they are very flexible and will over stretch with too much air.
They were an odd size tire, not a very common size so getting replacement tires was tricky at the time because there weren't a lot of tire options for that size.
I put a set of Carlisle 14x4.5x6NHS Chevron tires on many of those rims, the tires were made for a tiller and they were much stronger and heavier that had a regular bead and were belted.
You didn't need tire irons or a machine to change them, you just split the rim and they came right off. You had to be careful when you installed them so that you did not knock the bead ring out of the tire and once they were installed you did not want to put too much air pressure in them to seat the bead, they usually slid right in place. They were hollow inside, just like a regular tubeless tire but the sidewall and tread face was just like a thick inner-tube with knobby's on it.

Last edited by ST1100A; 11-27-2019 at 08:42 PM.
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post #10 of 27 Old 11-27-2019, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oneacer View Post
What is the rim size? , i.e. width and circumference.

Is there a size on those Ohatsu tires that you can read?

Are those split rims with a tube, or are they a tubeless rim?

With that information, you will be able to get a nice new pair of XTrax or SnowHog tires.

From what I read on this forum, because they have the 4 bolts going into the wheel and because it's about 13 years old, I believe they are the split rims. Tire size is 14x4.0-6.
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