Two part epoxy primer, paint and clear coat experiences? - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
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post #1 of 33 Old 06-19-2015, 10:11 PM Thread Starter
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Question Two part epoxy primer, paint and clear coat experiences?

Hello everyone,

I have several snowblowers that I would like to bring back into usable to restored conditions besides some modifications, but I am starting to think about the best way to prep and paint them (so that I will do it only once and it will de durable).

I've read a few post suggesting the use of two part epoxy since it it supposed to turn into a very hard paint that is supposed to withstand the weather conditions.

I don't mind spending twice or three times the money on epoxy paint versus standard paint if I know for fact that I will be much better and last a lot longer (the labor will be the same anyways).

I'm looking into durability even if I have to sacrifice the finish a bit.

Waiting to hear your experiences.
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post #2 of 33 Old 06-19-2015, 11:53 PM
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Two part epoxy is the only thing that really works. Mix it, reduce it a bit and spray it through a gun. Just make sure you wear a paint respirator. It is the real deal though, you may see paint flake off the epoxy, but the epoxy itself will stay there forever, you literally can't beat it off with a hammer. For something like a snowblower I'd paint over the epoxy with single stage urethane (something like U-tech is great) If using single stage there's no need for clear, and honestly for something like a snowblower, especially in a solid color there's no need for base/clear.

Also, make sure you sandblast first, a wire brush does not working for getting rust off before paint no matter how many times broke people try to say that it does. I've been broke, I've done the wire brush thing, it does not work.
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post #3 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 12:31 AM
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94EG8: What do you think about using phosphoric acid to remove rust prior to painting?

Can we get by with this for $19 from Harbor Freight?



http://www.harborfreight.com/21-oz-h...gun-95793.html
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post #4 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 08:00 AM Thread Starter
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Question

94EG8,

What do you think about this eastwood epoxy primer spray paint can?

Eastwood's 2K AeroSpray™ Epoxy Primer Gray

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post #5 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 08:09 AM
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Phosphoric acid doesn't really remove rust, it just converts it to iron phosphate. Sandblasting (or soda blasting) is really the only way to truly remove rust.

You can get by with a blaster like that but it will take forever unless you have almost no rust to start with. Mostly because the reservoir is so tiny, you can get a handheld siphon feed blaster that has a hose that goes into your bag of sand or a bucket for about the same price that will work much better. You can also rent a commercial grade unit pretty cheap for a day or a weekend.

Side note: You need a pretty decent a compressor to run a sandblaster. My 5hp, twin cylinder, 220v, 60 gallon single stage compressor would never shut off. It would sort of keep up in that I could keep running for as long as I wanted but it was really more than the compressor was designed for. My current 5hp, 60 gallon, twin cylinder, 2 stage will shut off, but it doesn't stay off long between cycles. Also, make sure you at the very least have one of those cheap inline water separators as if there's moisture in the line it will make the sand clump in the sandblaster hose and clog.
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post #6 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 11:42 AM
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94EG8:
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Originally Posted by 94EG8 View Post
Phosphoric acid doesn't really remove rust, it just converts it to iron phosphate.
Well that explains a lot. For light rust the phosphoric acid gives me shiny metal with a tint of black/charcoal grey. For heavy rust it gives a black surface which I am assuming is iron phosphate.

How about using a knotted wire wheel or other wire wheel or wire cup on a angle grinder?

I guess what I am asking is, if we get the metal visibly shiny are we good to go with epoxy or must there be an actual blasting process to get into the pores (?) of the metal?

Also do you recommend an epoxy primer before the epoxy top coat or is it unnecessary?

I recently started using epoxy resin instead of polyester resin for some fiberglass jobs (I recently did two shower pans) and once you get used to it, it is pretty good to work with two part epoxy products, but I have never sprayed 2-part epoxy paint.

And yes, I am aware that inhaling an epoxy paint can coat your lungs so bad as to kill you. So that a respirator is required.
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post #7 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 06:24 PM
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just sand down the rust with 80 grit paper then move up the scale. use self etching primer. any brand will do. have you looked at POR-15 HARDNOSE PAINT. you just pour in the hardener to the color. then brush it on. it may not look perfect. but the stuff is BULLET PROOF.

Long LIVE THE POWERSHIFT!! MAY IT NEVER RUST IN PEACE!!
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post #8 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 06:28 PM
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94EG8: Powershift93 has a good point. Wouldn't a belt sander with 80 grit do just as good as a sandblaster? Or is there a preferred type of surface which only a sandblaster can achieve?
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post #9 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E350 View Post
94EG8: Powershift93 has a good point. Wouldn't a belt sander with 80 grit do just as good as a sandblaster? Or is there a preferred type of surface which only a sandblaster can achieve?
a sandblaster can get into tight spots better. but the end result is the same.

Long LIVE THE POWERSHIFT!! MAY IT NEVER RUST IN PEACE!!
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post #10 of 33 Old 06-20-2015, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hsblowersfan View Post
94EG8,

What do you think about this eastwood epoxy primer spray paint can?

Eastwood's 2K AeroSpray™ Epoxy Primer Gray
I don't think much of any epoxy primer in a spray can, none of them have a proper hardener in them since they'll harden in the can before you can use them. They only stuff that really, truly works comes as a two part system that you mix, reduce and spray through a gun.

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Originally Posted by E350 View Post
94EG8: How about using a knotted wire wheel or other wire wheel or wire cup on a angle grinder?

I guess what I am asking is, if we get the metal visibly shiny are we good to go with epoxy or must there be an actual blasting process to get into the pores (?) of the metal?
You need to sandblast. No wire wheel will ever get all the rust, but a sandblaster will. Plus you'll end up with a super shiny, almost polished surface in places, which doesn't provide much of a surface for the primer to adhere to.

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Also do you recommend an epoxy primer before the epoxy top coat or is it unnecessary?
I've never used, nor do I believe you need an epoxy top coat. Just single stage automotive urethane paint, or even old acrylic enamel.

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94EG8: Powershift93 has a good point. Wouldn't a belt sander with 80 grit do just as good as a sandblaster? Or is there a preferred type of surface which only a sandblaster can achieve?
A belt sander just wont do what a sandblaster will. There really isn't a way around sandblasting if you want your hard work to last.

Also I didn't mention this, but you want to put your epoxy primer on almost immediately after sandblasting. You'll start seeing tiny rust spots forming again within less than half an hour sometimes depending on the humidity and how much water is coming out of the sandblaster.
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