How many DIYers out there? - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
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post #1 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 01:53 PM Thread Starter
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How many DIYers out there?

While I enjoy tinkering with my power equipment, I have my limitations.

Some of the things I'll do or have done include the following:
Oil, plug, filter, blade sharpening,cable adjustments/replacements and carburetor rebuilds. That's about it.

I've never gotten deep into the engine for valve adjustments, or anything of that nature.

I had a neighbor that used to go through my snow blower every fall and would replace the belts as required. So he moved away a few years go. This spring I was going to take my blower into the local shop where I bought it 5 1/2 years ago and have them go through it. But the more I think about it, the more I think I may try to tackle this myself. In addition to new belts, I though I replace the friction disc because a saw a few weeks ago when I was replacing the the differential trigger lock cable, the disc looks worn to me. I saw a few videos on YouTube for both belt and disc replacements that make it look not too difficult.
I always feel a sense of pride when doing this type of stuff myself !
Any thoughts or advice on this?

What about valve adjustments? I know it's never been done on this engine. Is this something that is done as part of regular maintenance? Or is this only done if there's a problem? Is it something the average Joe can tackle?

Thanks for any feedback! Loco

2010 Ariens Deluxe 27 (921012)
250cc B&S (1150 ft lbs)
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post #2 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 02:16 PM
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If you do you own valve adjustment as part of maintenance in the summer it prevents it from being necessary as a repair in the winter when you need the machine running properly.

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post #3 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 02:50 PM
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If you are fortunate enough to have an OHV (over head valve) engine, checking the valve clearances yearly is pretty simple during regular maintenance and is a good idea. If you have an older flat head motor, as I do, I normally wait for hard starting, weak compression or popping from the exhaust before I look at the valve clearance since it is considerably more trouble to do.

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post #4 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Grunt View Post
If you are fortunate enough to have an OHV (over head valve) engine, checking the valve clearances yearly is pretty simple during regular maintenance and is a good idea. If you have an older flat head motor, as I do, I normally wait for hard starting, weak compression or popping from the exhaust before I look at the valve clearance since it is considerably more trouble to do.
Yes. The proceedure is much more simple on an OHV. Remove spark plug and put engine piston to top dead center. Remove valve cover and check the intake side first with a feeler guage and then tighten the rocker nut until the clearence is correct on both the intake and exhaust valve. Also OHV engines tend to get noisier ie more click and clack sounding when the clearence gets too large and the rocker bangs into the tappet. Tightening it up quiets the engine clicking sounds. Typically the OHV engine will still run ok it just will be louder with more clicking sounds. On a flat head however if the valve seat sinks the valve will be stuck open a small amount and the engine will loose lots of power and bog and stall more easily.

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post #5 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 04:11 PM
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as a nut job do anything kinda guy id say you can do that easily. patience is the keyword here. you rush you break stuff. that is all... if you get stuck ask questions

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post #6 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 04:16 PM
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Hi Diablo
Checking valve lash on a flathead is easiest with the carburetor removed, as access to the valve galley is behind an inspection plate with multiple gaskets and can be. Much trickier with the carb on. Checking the clearances is a snap, but if they require "adjustment"....well, now you are looking at a much more involved repair. As Grunt mentioned, this repair is best done when snow season is over. MH

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post #7 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 04:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loco-diablo View Post
While I enjoy tinkering with my power equipment, I have my limitations.

Some of the things I'll do or have done include the following:
Oil, plug, filter, blade sharpening,cable adjustments/replacements and carburetor rebuilds. That's about it.

I've never gotten deep into the engine for valve adjustments, or anything of that nature.

I had a neighbor that used to go through my snow blower every fall and would replace the belts as required. So he moved away a few years go. This spring I was going to take my blower into the local shop where I bought it 5 1/2 years ago and have them go through it. But the more I think about it, the more I think I may try to tackle this myself. In addition to new belts, I though I replace the friction disc because a saw a few weeks ago when I was replacing the the differential trigger lock cable, the disc looks worn to me. I saw a few videos on YouTube for both belt and disc replacements that make it look not too difficult.
I always feel a sense of pride when doing this type of stuff myself !
Any thoughts or advice on this?

What about valve adjustments? I know it's never been done on this engine. Is this something that is done as part of regular maintenance? Or is this only done if there's a problem? Is it something the average Joe can tackle?

Thanks for any feedback! Loco
the old Tec. and Briggs engines have nonadjustable valves IIRC ? if there is too much clearance, you have to get a valve with a longer stem. If there is not enough clearance, you have to grind the stem down to make the valve shorter. or the valve may be pounded into the head, and it may need a new valve seat, which is a machine shop operation most times. although I have put the seat back in on a lawn tractor Briggs that kept dropping the exhaust valve seat onto the valve and hanging it open.

putting a friction disc on is child's play. the inside of a friction drive machine is gravy simple. the best advice I can give is, TAKE IT APART and look at it closely.

youtube videos are invaluable. watch them and see if you can pick up tips on the procedure you're doing. I have to put front axles in my Monte Carlo and the factory procedure is, break ball joints, tie rods loose, to free spindle. then remove axle. well I found a youtube vid where a guy simply removed the 2 lower strut bolts at top of spindle, loosens the spindle that way, guess what it flips down far enough to sneak the axle out, with the ball joint and tie rod still attached. so that's what I'm going to try.

been turning wrenches for 35 years now and I'm still learning. keep learning. that's the key. the worse habit to get into is, paying someone else to do it on a steady basis. sure it's the lazy, easy way, but it also leads to mechanical ineptitude- because unless you try it yourself, maybe break it, and learn as you go, including from your mistakes, a person becomes mechanically helpless.

buy a junk broken machine or 2 for cheap, with a blown engine, and take it apart, and put it back together, and see how it goes together. back in the 1980's I was able to buy GM A-body 2-door coupes like Cutlass, Skylark, LeMans, etc. for dirt cheap $50-$100, and take them apart to the bare frame just to mentally map out the design. I lucked out and even found a few higher end cars i.e. 442 Olds and Buick GS and Firebird and took those apart too. these were heavily rotted cars with no engines, or blown engines. it was the best hands on experience because there was no stress and I learned at my own pace- no boss leaning over me.

something I would NOT want to be, is a person whom without money to pay, has no clue, and is mechanically helpless. it reduces one's skills to picking what color they like on a machine they are going to buy. instead of building a knowledge based on personal experience and trial/error, they must rely on others. not exactly a manly way to be...IMHO...




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post #8 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 04:50 PM
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"Putting a friction disc on is child's play. the inside of a friction drive machine is gravy simple. the best advice I can give is, TAKE IT APART and look at it closely."

That's not always true as they aren't all built the same. Most are really simple but some you have to pull out almost everything to get the assembly the friction disc is mounted in, out.

Look at it closely first, take plenty of photos from different angles and THEN take it apart.
Best chance of getting it back together properly.

Just ask WestminsterFJR


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post #9 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 05:18 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys.. The motor is a 2009 B&S snow 250cc. It is OHV. I'll need to go purchase a set of feeler gauges as I don't have a set.

I did see a B&S OHV valve adjustment video on YouTube. While it wasn't my exact engine, I assume they all use the same adjustment procedure? It looks pretty straight forward. It actually looks less complicated than the belt and friction disc replacement. I plan on documenting stuff as I take it apart so I don't mess it up while re assembling.

This is a spring/ summer project. She's running fine right now. There's no way I would mess with it now. I live in central Massachusetts. I'm expecting I'll be using it her least a couple more times!

2010 Ariens Deluxe 27 (921012)
250cc B&S (1150 ft lbs)
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post #10 of 23 Old 02-28-2015, 06:23 PM
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I'm not sure how you adjust valve clearance on the Honda clones, but Briggs says to rotate the engine 1/4" past top dead center before adjusting the valves. Here is a LINK to the Briggs service manual which has the adjustment procedure. Good luck, take your time and learn. GWB said it very well.

Toro 8/24 (38080) 1989
Toro 721-QZR (38743) 2015 (Hemi Predator Power)

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