Can I add heated grips to a new Toro 826 OXE - Snowblower Forum : Snow Blower Forums
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 01-29-2019, 09:33 PM Thread Starter
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Can I add heated grips to a new Toro 826 OXE

A friend is looking to upgrade from his Troy Bilt blower to a Toro 826 OXE but sure loves his heated grips on his Troy Bilt. Can we add grips to this Toro? I tried to find what the output of the stator might be but cant find this info. Anyone have a answer to my question. Sure would like to see him get a Toro.
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post #2 of 7 Old 02-01-2019, 08:43 AM
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No answers yet, so I'll give you my guess, anyways. I would speculate that the alternator's output is sized for just a light, assuming it has one. I'd imagine there wouldn't be much extra power left over for heated grips.

Can you compare in a store with a model that has heated grips? Maybe there are 2 electrical outputs, for instance, if it also has heated grips. If the model in question also had the second output, then maybe it's ready for heated grips already.

But to be conservative, I'd plan on minimal extra power being available for grips. Maybe you could give up a light, to help power mild grips?

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post #3 of 7 Old 02-01-2019, 09:29 AM
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I agree RedOctobyr. My machine came with a light, and an 18 watt alternator that would run the light only. Light is not important to me so I did a little modification by adding grip heaters, and a switch so that I could select light OR heated grips. I also cheated a bit more by bypassing the diode in the power output wire (Briggs and Stratton engine). I tapped the power before the diode to get AC power instead of half wave DC power.

The Grips are fine with the AC power and I get more power for the grips which did not heat well on the half wave DC. The light burns bit too bright, and I may do a bit more modification to the switch circuit in spring so that the light gets the DC and the grips get the AC. Still can only run one accessory at a time however.

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post #4 of 7 Old 02-05-2019, 02:34 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedOctobyr View Post
No answers yet, so I'll give you my guess, anyways. I would speculate that the alternator's output is sized for just a light, assuming it has one. I'd imagine there wouldn't be much extra power left over for heated grips.

Can you compare in a store with a model that has heated grips? Maybe there are 2 electrical outputs, for instance, if it also has heated grips. If the model in question also had the second output, then maybe it's ready for heated grips already.

But to be conservative, I'd plan on minimal extra power being available for grips. Maybe you could give up a light, to help power mild grips?
Quote:
Originally Posted by skutflut View Post
I agree RedOctobyr. My machine came with a light, and an 18 watt alternator that would run the light only. Light is not important to me so I did a little modification by adding grip heaters, and a switch so that I could select light OR heated grips. I also cheated a bit more by bypassing the diode in the power output wire (Briggs and Stratton engine). I tapped the power before the diode to get AC power instead of half wave DC power.

The Grips are fine with the AC power and I get more power for the grips which did not heat well on the half wave DC. The light burns bit too bright, and I may do a bit more modification to the switch circuit in spring so that the light gets the DC and the grips get the AC. Still can only run one accessory at a time however.
Tks for the input guys. I’ll have to look at the machine to see what is possible. Is there a means to measure the output of the stator using a multimeter? This machine has a led as its light so shouldn’t draw much but have no problem not using the light if the output would only support grips. Tks.
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post #5 of 7 Old 02-05-2019, 03:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdestuck View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedOctobyr View Post
No answers yet, so I'll give you my guess, anyways. I would speculate that the alternator's output is sized for just a light, assuming it has one. I'd imagine there wouldn't be much extra power left over for heated grips.

Can you compare in a store with a model that has heated grips? Maybe there are 2 electrical outputs, for instance, if it also has heated grips. If the model in question also had the second output, then maybe it's ready for heated grips already.

But to be conservative, I'd plan on minimal extra power being available for grips. Maybe you could give up a light, to help power mild grips?
Quote:
Originally Posted by skutflut View Post
I agree RedOctobyr. My machine came with a light, and an 18 watt alternator that would run the light only. Light is not important to me so I did a little modification by adding grip heaters, and a switch so that I could select light OR heated grips. I also cheated a bit more by bypassing the diode in the power output wire (Briggs and Stratton engine). I tapped the power before the diode to get AC power instead of half wave DC power.

The Grips are fine with the AC power and I get more power for the grips which did not heat well on the half wave DC. The light burns bit too bright, and I may do a bit more modification to the switch circuit in spring so that the light gets the DC and the grips get the AC. Still can only run one accessory at a time however.
Tks for the input guys. I’ll have to look at the machine to see what is possible. Is there a means to measure the output of the stator using a multimeter? This machine has a led as its light so shouldn’t draw much but have no problem not using the light if the output would only support grips. Tks.
Using a multimeter to measure the amps of the stator you would find the output and ground, make sure they’re disconnect/no load placed on the stator, bring the engine to full throttle and quickly test the amps.

It’s a 12v system so you can use this tool and enter your 12v and amps to get watts and ohms of your stator.
https://www.rapidtables.com/calc/ele...alculator.html

Next you can test the ohms/resistance of your LED. Then again use the above link to see its watts/amps.

Then test ohms of warmers individually, in series, and in parallel to find their watts/amps and correct configuration using the link.

If the hand warms + LED exceed your stator/altinators output you can step down the current of the hand warmers from 12v to 9v using this:
12V to 9V 2A 18W DC-DC Buck Power Converter Voltage Regulator Transformer Voltage Step Down Power Supply Module Waterproof https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00C66JTPI..._8KuwCbRYAVBBT

They would be less warm than full power but still functional and within spec of your machines stator output.

Examples attached from when I added warmers to my machine.

27w would overpower my 18w stator so I stepped the current down to 9v to get me 16w hand warmers.
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MODS: Tecumseh OHSK120 12hp, 3" Pulley, 6 Blade Impeller Kit, Hand Warmers w/ on-off switch, 1700 Lumen LED bulb,Front Weight Bar 18.5lbs, Chute Clean Out Tool, Tire Chains, Drift Cutters, Armorskids
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post #6 of 7 Old 02-05-2019, 09:37 AM
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Post the engine model number and manfacturer and maybe from that, we can determine the alternator specs. Briggs engine numbers tell you what kind of alternator, if any, is installed. I imagine other manufacturers do too.

Trying to measure the output with a meter would require that you have some load resistors to try so you can see how much load current will flow before the voltage drops below a useable level. I would not recommend just shorting the output circuit through an Ammeter as it might be hard on the alternator windings, and you would need a second meter to monitor voltage while reading current on the other. Lots of balls to juggle there.

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post #7 of 7 Old 02-05-2019, 12:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skutflut View Post
Trying to measure the output with a meter would require that you have some load resistors to try so you can see how much load current will flow before the voltage drops below a useable level. I would not recommend just shorting the output circuit through an Ammeter as it might be hard on the alternator windings, and you would need a second meter to monitor voltage while reading current on the other. Lots of balls to juggle there.
In addition, as you said, that current is at some "meaningless" voltage, if it's shorted out.

If you just get some heaters to try it, I'd suggest an adjustable-output voltage regulator. Rather than a fixed 12V->9V regulator. That 9V might be perfect for some applications. But it may be too high, or too low, with different wattage heaters, a different alternator, etc. An adjustable one would let you dial in an output voltage that puts decent power to the heaters, without overloading the alternator.

One example:



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Toro Power Curve 1800

Last edited by RedOctobyr; 02-05-2019 at 12:57 PM.
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