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I have an old 7hp early 70's 2 stage blower from Ariens. It was my Grandparents bought new and serviced yearly. It has lasted almost 40 years! How much longer will it last and what are it's faults or weak points from the factory? It is a tank and really works great still and I added electric start 2 years ago so it is much easier to start now! I live in Vermont so she isn't babied but I'm just curious if I need to start worrying about breakage on any major parts. If I ever do need to retire her are the Ariens made today as good as my old battle ax?
 

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I have an old 7hp early 70's 2 stage blower from Ariens. It was my Grandparents bought new and serviced yearly. It has lasted almost 40 years! How much longer will it last and what are it's faults or weak points from the factory? It is a tank and really works great still and I added electric start 2 years ago so it is much easier to start now! I live in Vermont so she isn't babied but I'm just curious if I need to start worrying about breakage on any major parts. If I ever do need to retire her are the Ariens made today as good as my old battle ax?
Milk it as long as you can! I've used that type in the past. No more Tecumseh engine on the newer ones. I bought a new Ariens, and they are a whole different ballgame, compared to the one you speak of. I discovered; When filling with gas, you can't tell how full the tank is til it overflows. The machine is underpowered & geared too high. (even in first gear) The low speed auger is positioned above the ground so you must fight to keep the machine moving forward in a straight line. I also experienced drive slip. There is no throttle; when the engine starts it revs to high rpm immediately. The headlight does not have an on/off switch; mine burnt out after a few uses. It throws snow further than the older ones, and the discharge chute controls are handy.
 

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A snowblower which has spent its entire service life (45+ years) in Vermont has seen a lot of work. The Ariens Sno-Thro attachment, tractor drive and controls are certainly built to last for 45+ years and beyond.

The Tecumseh engine has probably started to consume oil at some rate higher than when it was newer. Just be sure to check the oil level before every use. Keep track of the hours of operation and change the engine oil after 25 hours of operation. Also, it's best to store the machine over the Summer with fresh oil in the crankcase because older oil tends to accumulate water.

You'll want to remove the auger shear bolts, pump grease into the zerk fittings , spin the augers to distribute grease then replace shear bolts. Check the oil level in the auger gearbox and top it off with the recommended lubricant. If the seals start to leak then drain away the gear oil and replace it with NLGI 00 grease (liquid grease) which won't leak out.

Drain gas out of the carburetor float bowl after operation via a little pushbutton valve located on the carburetor float bowl. Remove gas from the tank for Summer storage.

If the Tecumseh engine fails then you can purchase a Predator engine for $99, bolt it right on and you're good-to-go for many more years.
 

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Chains work nice on those machines. Love the locking hubs, at least they had them on the 32" models. The only weak point for time I saw on a 7hp 32" built in 1968 and used til 1999 was the auger gear box up front. Should that gear box strip out on you it will be crazy expensive to replace. Only way out would be find a used one on e-bay or the like. Otherwise you have a nice machine. The Tecumseh engine is designed for winter use and is built proof with just a yearly oil change.
 
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