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Discussion Starter #1
Are the tubeless tires on a '76 Toro 724 (#31677) Snow Thrower
noted for sealing issues?

A previous owner has inserted a tube in one wheel assembly. The
tube has a brass valve stem that is a poor match for the shape of
the Toro's wheel - makes it difficult to attach an air chuck.

I would prefer restoring the assembly to a tubeless configuration
by removing the tube and installing an OEM style rubber valve
stem. However, if these wheels are known for sealing issues, I
will stick with a tube and perhaps look for one with a better stem
shape.

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Tubes in general will leak less. You have very old rims that are likely rusty and not smooth and you have old tires that are likely cracked and leaky.

I have seen 2 style of tubes. Straight valve and bent 90 degrees valve. The 90 degree ones work best on my Ariens because they stick straight out the side while the straight valves end up right against the center hubs and have to be forcefully bent outward to air them up.
 

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Shryp is correct. Tubeless tires are often a pain since once the wheels get old and the tires get old and the rims get rusty they tend to go flat. I used to have a tubeless tires and then I would go out to the shed in the fall and my tire(s) would be flat. I replaced both of them with a tube and I haven't had any more problems with them getting low on air even let alone being flat. Some tubes have rubber bicycle shrader style valves instead of the long metal ones that can be a pain or hard to hook up to an air pump
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you.

The irony here is that it is the tube side that needs recurring
attention. The tubeless side just soldiers on.

Change tubes - another line item for the '14 summer maintenance list.

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Perhaps the tube was pinched when it was installed. Either that or the rim wasn't cleaned and the rust got to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You've given me another thought - I should administer a saliva
check on the end of the valve stem.

The leak has been very slow. With luck, a twist of the valve
might bring the matter to a close.

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i have a few different types of machines that have short valve stems. the cheap solution was just to get an extension fo to put on when airing up the tires
 

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i have a few different types of machines that have short valve stems. the cheap solution was just to get an extension fo to put on when airing up the tires
Or get something like the gas stations have where there's a handle with the control valve, a straight section of air hose then a straight tip on it for pressing up to the tire valve (a straight airchuck end). If you can get a straight shot at the valve, you can put air in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
HCBPH, the difficulty lies with how the end of the stem is cantilevered
up against the rim along a rolled contour that the tire bead seats into.
Getting the business end of an airchuck onto that stem isn't impossible
but it is more unpleasant than airing up a tire has to be and it gets worse
as pressure in the tube levers the stem more firmly against the rim.

detdrbuzzard's suggestion to just add an extension is a cheap, effective
solution. I will just remove the extension and cap the valve afterward so
the extension/stem doesn't catch on something during operation.

Thank you one and all.

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