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Discussion Starter #1
Happy 2018 Everyone,

I have come across a somewhat unique machine - a Toro 726TE - which is a 2-stage blower with a 7 HP 2-stroke engine. I was not familiar with this Toro model, as my experience is mostly with the older Toro 2-stage machines. I have commonly associated the 2-stroke engines with the smaller single-stage machines, figuring it was primarily for weight reduction purposes.

I see that @tdipaul has posted a bit about these machines, just looking for some comment about . . .

Does the 2-stroke engine give smoother power, having 1 power stroke per revolution vs. the 4-stroke's 1 power stroke per 2 revolutions?

Since the engine oil is delivered via the fuel, is there an RPM advantage to the 2-strokes, since the 4-stroke engines are generally limited to 3600 RPM for reliable lubrication?

I also see that these machines were only made for a few years . . . any particular reason they were discontinued?

Anything particular about the "R-Tek" 2-cycle engine that makes it good/bad?

I have a few outboard boat engines, so pretty familiar with 2-strokes, just wondering how that plays out on a mid-sized (26") 2-stage machine?

Thanks in advance (TIA) for any comments about "2-stage/2-stroke" machines in general and/or this Toro 726TE model.
 

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The main sales point was easier /less maintenance and lighter engine. They didn't sell very good and emissions laws was most likely what killed them. We still use one as a beater at the shop it's loud but throws good.
 

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The 2-stroke makes sense where very small engines are needed, like weed wackers and chain saws..but I dont see any advantage for a snowblower...also, people dont want to mix oil with the gas, if they have the option not to. (I bet that is the main reason they arent used! ;) people want to be as lazy as possible..that, plus the fact that they simply arent needed..)

Ariens also tried it in the 80's..they didnt last long..

Scot
 

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The biggest advantage to 2 stroke are lighter weight, more power in a smaller package. The smell of 2 stroke exhaust (call me nuts but that smells like summer to me), and there are 27 less moving parts in a two stroke, to one part similar sized, HP wise, four stroke. Less to go wrong, not that much ever does.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies so far . . . I guess it is an idea that did not work out.

Don't see any real advantage except weight. It seems like they are getting the 7 HP out of about 141cc vs. 208cc on a 4 stroke, if I recall correctly.

Probably more of a collector's item vs. an advantage type of machine. :icon-shrug:
 

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There is nothing wrong with them - as far as the motor goes it has horsepower to spare, and with modern synthetic two stroke mix the smoking is almost non-existant.

I just spent the weekend getting used to my Powermax 6000 with the same engine, and it gives up nothing to the newer machines as far as throwing snow.

I only have a couple of beefs with it - first, a quart and a half fuel capacity. And it likes fuel.

Second, the lightweight of the machine is fine for turning and wrestling around, but I'm thinking about adding a weight to the front to keep the auger down and digging into berms from the snowplow.
 

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IMHO, it was an answer to a question nobody asked. The PTWR of a 2-stroke is really of no advantage in a snowblower.
 

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The reason I bought my Powermax 6000 was to get the 2 cycle engine.

My dead fathers CCR3000 single stage was and is an animal, up to a foot of snow, and it's 30 years old and still going strong.

I figured if the bigger RTek motor in the Powermax lasted half as long it'll last me the rest of my life. :)
 

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You are right - power-to-weight ratio is important in a chainsaw, or weedeater, but not a machine that stays planted on the ground :)
 

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I believe the same hp in a two stroke has a higher torq rating than a 4 stroke. My old 4 hp lawn boys could mow some thick tall grass better than a 6 hp 4 stroke.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, it looks like the 726TE that I saw on CL sold within a day, so there must be a following of these machines. Price was a steal at $150 :surprise: so that probably had something to do with it.
 

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The torque of the 726te is incredible - I did some mild mods to mine that upped the RPM and as you can see from the videos it throws amazing. It also eats through the worst EOD better than a comparable Toro 926/928 (my two best friends have those). The torque is incredible.

If you can put cream or sugar in your coffee you can mix gas - amazes me that people find it inconvenient or difficult. These are probably the same people who don't change the oil on their 4 strokes - because changing the oil on a 4 stroke snowblower engine is WAY more aggravation/work than mixing oil and gas.

The simple reason they went away is the EPA, thats it. And the idea that 4 stroke engines are better/more premium. ( lol )
 

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Sorry to bring up old post, but my 726 TE, which I bought in either 2003 or 2004, stills seems to have as much power as it did when new . IMO , a well built 2 stroke, which is fed a premium mix, will last as long or longer than the best 4 cycle. 2 strokes do have incredible torque , as any familiar with 2 stroke bikes knows. Mine does not smoke ( when warm ) using Amsoil 2 cycle oil. It is loud, but I like the sound of the 2 stroke.
 
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