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Discussion Starter #1
I have both dino and synthetic grease in my garage and I use BOTH! Why? Dino is cheaper! And there are applications that don't require a better grease with it's advantages.

The short, if the application is subject to water, I use synthetic. If the application requires less rolling resistance, I use synthetic. If it requires slipperiness, synthetic. If not getting thicker in cold weather is important, I use synthetic.

First the four main reasons I use synthetic grease, then the applications I use dino versus synthetic grease.

After time, though a long long time, regular grease hardens as the volatile ingredients evaporate, same as gasoline, the latter at a substantially higher rate eventually leaving a goo then a varnish. Dino breaks down with age, not synthetic. Granted, this is an inconsequential reason to use synthetic alone.

Synthetic grease is not affected by water as dino is, very important for snowblower applications. I use this on the axle where the wheels roll. I also use it for the auger zerk fittings.

Synthetic grease is slippery than dino so things roll easier. The reasoning, more applicable to synthetic oil, the molecules of dino oil are not uniform, they are irregular shapes, just globs, do they don't roll over each other easily. The molecules of synthetic oil are perfectly round and of the same size so things roll easier. Picture marbles on a table, roll your hand across the top of them, they roll, easy, in any direction. Not so for dino. I use Synthetic grease for the hexagon bar that the rubber friction disk slides on. Again for the auger's zerk fittings. I don't think the slipperiness for the auger is important as the rolling resistance is inconsequential and the space tolerance is too great.

In cold weather, synthetic grease does not thicken. This is important where things need to slide and roll easier, as for the hex friction disk bar. Again the axle and auger is not relevant for this reason. The auger is turning at such a speed that it's warming the grease not allowing it to thicken. For a test comparing dino to synthetic, leave two quarts of oil outside in 0 or 10 degree temperature overnight, the colder the more accurate this test is, the easier it is to see the difference. Pour each quart out. You will see a substantial difference in the thickness of the oil. The dino oil will be noticeable! thicker I cold weather. The synthetic will pour like it was summer. You will not notice the difference between summer or winter with synthetic. This is especially true for 85w differential and transfer case oil.

I use dino for all my grease joints on my vehicles, front end, tie rod ends, ball joints, universal joints. I use synthetic grease from a small tub for wheel bearings because they turning, revolving, and create friction. I want to reduce the rolling resistance and I want the bearings to last longer. I also use it for my mowers.

I use Synthetic oil and grease exclusively for snowblowers for the benefits and the amount I use where I could be using dino is again, inconsequential.

Hope this helps everyone and clarifies the reasoning.
 

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I've been using synthetic oil for about 25 yrs. I've been using synthetic grease for around 15 or so years.
They claim it is food grade. They also say it won't break down in water. Well maybe in fresh water, but it does break down in salt water. For salt water I went back to water pump grease. But for everything else I use synthetic. Great stuff.
Sid
 

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I just use Synthetic for everything because it's easier. One tub for wheel bearings and two or three tubes for the grease gun. I used to consider the cost difference but the couple bucks extra compared to how long that tub of grease lasts or how infrequently I need to reload the gun . . . IMHO I'd just rather have the better grease in all my applications.

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Discussion Starter #5
My situation is I bought a 5 gallon can of dino grease years and years ago and have been using it up. I'm down to less than a gallon now. Not replacing it! So I carefully choose where to use it to get rid of it.

Regarding cost, it's really negligible depending how much you use. I have a small bicycle repair business and use exclusively synthetic, wheel bearings and head set bearings. With 7 area bike shops, none of them use Synthetic grease saying the cost is too expensive. I pay retail, $10 for a hand size tub of synthetic, dino is $4. Bike shops of course pay less. I do a hundred wheels from a tub. Making this up, if it costs me 10¢ a wheel for synthetic and dino is 4¢ and bike shops pay less, then say it's too expensive, they can't afford 10¢ more per bike for something that rolls easier? Lasts longer, and makes the bike faster. When I coast down a hill not pedaling, everyone is in awe, why, how come? But yet they are stupid and don't want to pay me to clean and grease their wheel bearings using synthetic. I have seen many wheels that dino grease is so hard I could chip it out but use lacquer thinner instead to dissolve it. I've taken bicycle wheels apart at 10,000 miles and then again at 20,000 miles to find their was no need to grease the wheel again after using synthetic. I have no idea how long it will last in a bicycle wheel.

I just use Synthetic for everything because it's easier. One tub for wheel bearings and two or three tubes for the grease gun. I used to consider the cost difference but the couple bucks extra compared to how long that tub of grease lasts or how infrequently I need to reload the gun . . . IMHO I'd just rather have the better grease in all my applications.
 

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jlawrence: do you use synthetic grease on the bottom brackets of your bicycles
 

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Discussion Starter #7
jlawrence: do you use synthetic grease on the bottom brackets of your bicycles
I use the term bottom bracket to denote that housing area where the bearings and axle are.

The older newer bikes (for many many years, going back 20-30 yrs) use sealed bottom brackets, one type is called ISIS! But there are others, all similar idea. The axle is part of the bearings and the bottom bracket. The newer bikes, past 10 yrs, use outboard bearings instead of a bottom bracket unit. The latter is essentially a bearing on each side of the bike with a separate removable axle going through the middle. These are not greasable at all. Where as sealed wheel bearings are greasable.

The real old bikes, the "10 speed" Schwinns, Peugeot, Motobecane, Raleigh, use individual ball bearings inside a cage. These are removable and greased. For those, I don't use Synthetic grease unless the bike is a long distance bike rather than a ride around town bike, and then I charge extra for the synthetic grease because it uses a lot.
 
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