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Hello, great forum, 1st post. I have a CubCadet 828SWE that is about 14 years old. The engine runs well. The drive mechanism is fair. I change the oil etc myself but do not repair it myself. My local shop (which appears honest) looked at it last year and told me the dive mechanism was good but the belts needed replacement. This helped somewhat but the drive is not great. Is it worth fixing this machine? I understand the Tecumseh engine is no longer made. I am concerned with the winter starting I may be left with a non-functioning blower. How do the new machines (I know not to get the new CubCadet) stack up? Thanks for helping this newbie!
-Phil
 

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Is it friction disc drive? Do you still have the manual? You could try replacing the friction disc rubber and cleaning the metal plate. You could also probably just tighten the adjustments.

Type friction disc here and it will show you how to replace MTD and Ariens. Will also give you a good idea of how the transmission and drive mechanisms all work. It is a basic system and anyone that looks at it should be able to understand it and fix it fairly easily.
donyboy73's Channel - YouTube

Here is one showing how it works:
 

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Even with a chain it might still have a friction disc setup. Have you physically removed the cover and taken a look in there to see what might be causing the drive to not work? Pictures of the machine and / or the drive system with the bottom cover removed might help some of us figure out what the problem is.

I wouldn't worry too much about the engine if it still runs fine. 14 years is kind of old, but they don't get a lot of use and if it was taken care of it should still be good for quite a few years to come.
 

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Take a rag with some gas or brake cleaner and clean the metal disc real good and also spin the rubber and clean the edge of it. This will get you the best possible grip. Also check the adjustments for the engagement. They need to be tightened a bit as the rubber wears off the friction disc. I have no idea how yours is, but Ariens uses a nut where it goes into the chassis and says tighten it until wheels start to bind and then loosen 1.5 turns. MTD just has cables with an adjustment nut on them.
 

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according to partstree.com your blower, cub cadet 826 swe is a chain drive but the chain drives a friction wheel assembly. i wouldnt get rid of it. i am a fan of the older the better. my blowers are around 47 years old.. does it slip in drive or skip. are any actual problems or are you just worried about failure due to age? bad belts or a fair condition friction plate or possibly both would make it barely move if at all. belt replacement is easy, friction wheel is as well. if a shop does it it still shouldnt be too pricey. i dont use repair shops, maybe someone else would have a better idea of pricing.

here is the diagram for it.

Parts and Diagrams for Cub Cadet 826 SWE (2000 HM)
 

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slow at typing, you responded already.

i could take a pic of a brand new friction wheel i have and a pic of the one i have on the machine so you could compare them. i cleaned both wheel and plate but still barely works in reverse and forward is so-so. just havent put the new one in yet
 

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this was a slipping friction disc. only slipped slightly in forward. quite a bit in reverse. pic1 is old and 2 is new

i did not think the old one was that bad
 

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Drive issues

I'm not a big fan of friction disc machines, but having rebuilt one over the summer I've found a few things.

1 There is some mechanism to put tension on the friction disc to the drive wheel when driving the rear wheels, that may be out of adjustment. On mine there was an adjustment in the handle shifter along with a spring that needed to be adjusted correctly.

2 That old disc looks so-so to me, for what a new one costs (if you do it yourself) it's a fairly inexpensive part in relation to the whole snowblower.

3 The one I rebuilt had a bad bushing on the shaft that connects the pulley to the friction disc. With the belt off and tension off the friction disc, see if there's extra play in there. If the bushings are bad, that can cause extra slack in the belt which would cause slipping.

4 If your belt is glazed, it's not going to grip the pulley very well. Same if it's the wrong size or length of belt or the tensioner is not adjusted properly.

That's all I can think of right now. If your machine is in otherwise good shape, I'd find the problem and fix it rather than look into another one. Then again, that's just me.
 

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i prefer my old snowblowers that have actual transmissions as well. that disc is for a 10 hp blower. but i cant sell it if it does not work right. disc is done and works fine. new disc was $38 at sears parts. i dont think this blower was ever apart so a few parts were frozen onto shafts but even with that delay it wasnt bad. took about 2 1/2 hours.. compared to some of the you tube videos which seem a great deal easier, this one was more involved. had to pull a tire off to get the shaft for the carrier out. some videos show a nut on each side of the machine and then the carrier assembly comes out. but not this one.
 

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TD5771

You're lucky to find one after a very few years, some brands/models are harder to find than others. That one I rebuilt I was thinking about changing the disc but it had other issues. Made a mount and move the tension spring from the handlebar to inside the drive area mainly because it was missing and couldn't find the parts so I made my own. The disc was unavailable from Sears and didn't find any elsewhere. I picked up a Toro friction disc with the intentions of opening up the center hole and using that but didn't need to once I got some tension on the disc, that solved it's drive issues.
 

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it took a long time to find. its an old bolens model 1032 but no parts ever came up, the model number never came up on any site, even the mtd site. blower is around 1993 vintage.

keep this in mind....i got the friction disc by finally digging up a parts manual. then putting the part number only with no reference to the model number, into sears parts and it came up.

must be used on many other machines.
 

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Disc

If that's a 6" friction disc with something like around a 2 1/2" center opening, if you still have the part number could you pm me that info? I'd love to have it available in case I come up against this again. I poked around for hours and never turned up anything. The part number from the manual was discontinued on the one I was looking for.

Thanks
 

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3" center opening, 5 and 15/16 od (close enough) if you want the bolt pattern let me know.


what was the numbers info on the blower you were restoring?
 

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Snowblower

The one I have is a 536.90515 Craftsman, I think it may be a AYP maker but I'm not sure as I suppose it could be a Murray. The Sears part number from the manual is 35585 'Disc Assembly, Rubber'. I'd have to go open the chassis up again but the hold where the shaft and bearing goes through is around 2 1/2" from what I remember. I did find Toro had one with a 1 1/2" hole but the correct OD so I thought about just chucking it into the lathe and opening it up. Sounds like yours isn't the same one either, though I do appreciate the info if I ever find another machine needing a disc with a bigger opening.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the replies. I tightened the belt somewhat and it is running better. I love that the engine start right up and runs well. The impeller and augers have rust but appear in fair shape (no holes). I think I'll get through this winter (I hope!).
 

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if you were handy enough to adjust the idler pulley or whatever the adjustment is to tighten the belt you are surely capable of changing belts.

if you aren't going to change them now it might be a good idea to just buy them and hang them up so when you get a storm and it eats a belt or starts slipping again you can just change them and not have to worry about them being in stock or closed
 

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I have gone through two friction discs in my blower in the ten years i have owned it. But i found that once the disc gets about half worn, half its original size, its still plenty capable of working but the tension wasn't enough to keep it applied to the metal disc, add some tension to keep it working or replace it. I bought a spring at the hardware store that i added on to provide some more pressure, not a ton just a little bit more, i think the original springs are actually a bit weak with age.

The extra spring pressure isn't enough to make disengaging difficult, and there is no appreciable difference in wear or grip with a new friction disc, it just basically brings it back to how it should be. I contacted Craftsman/Sears for some new springs, they aren't available, so i added a medium tension spring about the same length as the original and just doubled them up.

Also take a scuff pad to the metal wheel, i like to use some brake clean and a 3m brown scuff pad, just like you would do to prep brake rotors. I do that once at the beginning of the season and also clean the rubber friction disc with some dish soap and water to degrease it. The brake cleaner and others will eat the rubber a bit and make it worse.

Usually i powerwash the entire underchassis area, then clean and scuff the metal disc, then grease everything. Oiling the drive chains requires some attention, i used to use plain old oil but then figured out i was getting some oil slung onto the metal disc or friction disc causing drive problems. So i started using a grease product on the chains as well, i don't recall its name, but i found it in my local farm supply store, its sold specifically as a chain lubricant that sticks like grease and stays on the chain but has good cold weather properties as well.

Keep that old machine humming. 14 years isn't much. I put 38 years on my Tecumseh before it finally gave up and i replaced it. Repowering is always an option!
 
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