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Here we go again. The more I study this forum the more confused I get.
A local gas station now sells 93 octane ethanol free gasoline. This brings up a few questions.

1. Do I still need to add a stabilizer (treatment) to ethanol free gas? I plan to strictly use this gas in my new snowblower.

2. Does using ethanol free gas change whether I should drain the tank and carburetor during the summer? The dealer recommended to close the fuel valve and run the carburetor dry after each run. They filled the tank with 91 octane 10% ethanol gas with stabilizer.

3. My lawn tractor has a plastic fuel tank, the push mower and snowblower have metal. Does summer and winter storage differ in metal as with plastic?

4. And lastly. Can I use the ethanol free gas with mixture in 2 cycle engines? ( string trimmer and leaf blower).

Toro Power Max HD 826 OXE
 

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These are good questions and I have wondered how people store their machines here. I've had problems storing stabilized ethanol gas in a generator and needed carb work. I have not had any problems storing stabilized ethanol gas in a lawn tractor over the winter for 4 years now. I add double the stabilizer and fill up the tank. It has always fired up in the spring so far. This year I will drain the tank, add some trufuel (ethanol free gas) and run it dry.

I am thinking that using ethanol free gas (Trufuel) in the new snowblower is the right approach. I want to fill the tank at the first snow and then keep the tank filled throughout the snow season. Keeping the tank filled keeps less oxygen from interacting with the fuel. (It is oxygen that causes breakdown of some components in a process called oxidation.) I will use the fuel shut-off valve and drain the carb after each use. In the spring, I shut off the fuel, run dry, then drain the tank and the carb. I hope this is okay. I am new to this too.

I don't see how it would hurt to add stabilizer to your premium ethanol-free fuel. I don't know if it is necessary though. In the old days, we never used stabilizer. I'm aware now that gasoline is a blend of different components. The big problem with ethanol gas is that ethanol separates from the gas and also attracts water. So a big pool of watery ethanol is left in the bottom of the tank near the pick-up.

Yes, you can use ethanol-free gas with mix in 2-cycle

Here is an excellent post from SnowG found in this thread:First time snowblower buyer/operator - need advice (Multi-page thread 1 2) Look under new posts-last 2 days.
Because your machine might go long periods without use, I strongly recommend TruFuel instead of ethanol. It will keep your fuel system from gumming up in storage and it remains stable at least 2 years, compared with treated ethanol (which is only good for 30-60 days). I have no financial interest in that company -- I just like my stuff to work when I need it.

The following images are ethanol that was stored in a properly closed gas tank in an open boat for 60 days, and had been treated with Stabil360 ethanol fuel stabilizer at the time of purchase. The first picture shows it looked cloudy when siphoning it.


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The second picture shows what it looked like after settling for a few hours. I think they call this "phase separation" and I assume the stuff on the top is gasoline and the stuff on the bottom is a mix of water and alcohol and perhaps other chemicals. Not suitable for use, regardless of what it is.


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Thanks, SnowG. My apologies for misrepresenting the quote. I have fixed the attribution. It is fine work and shows exactly why the ethanol gas causes problems.
 

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You can buy a gallon of True Fuel or one of their competitors for around $20/gallon plus or minus a dollar.

I think True fuel is great but you decide if it is worth the convenience.

If you get no-ethanol gas locally you should still use some type of stabilizer. Unless you are going to use it up fast. It is just good insurance against water condensation.

You can use the 93 octane in your two cycle OPE. Many 2 cycle mfg are now recommending 89 octane or higher. Some 2 cyce Manufacterers are private labeling a True Fuel type of product and it is 93 or 94 octain. Husqarvarna is one. Also, Some of the cheaper fuel line used on 2 cycle OPE is degraded quicker by ehtanol.

I use True fuel in my 2 Cycle OPE for the convenience. I use one can a year for about $6 and that covers me.
I don't think it is worth it for me in my 4 cycle machines. I just buy E0 gas or buy in small quantities and stabilize.

It is good to understand the pro and cons and everyone can decide what is best for them.
 

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I only use E0 in the snow blower (stabilized plus Sea Foam) including for summer storage. I get it from the pump with a cost not much more than regular unleaded E10. I feel like it is cheap insurance and knock on wood, I've never had a carb or starting problem in any of my OPE.

I don't use it during the mowing season with my riding mower but will use it before it's stored for the winter.
 

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$20.00 a gallon!? GOOD GRIEF! I go though 5-8 gallons a season in my blower..
If you go through that much gas in your snowthrower than you don't need to worry as much about stability. Those of us who only get occasional use need to be a lot more concerned, and it's worth it not to have fuel system problems, IMHO
 

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that's a valid point. Yet- I kind of feel this has come a full circle.. if you fill up your gas can and then throw in some stabil.. You're good for a year.
 

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If you go through that much gas in your snowthrower than you don't need to worry as much about stability. Those of us who only get occasional use need to be a lot more concerned, and it's worth it not to have fuel system problems, IMHO
All Good points above!
That is why every one has to assess their situation. If you use 1 gallon or less a year it may be worth it depending on other options in your area. Some folks don't have other practical options for E0 gas. When it comes to 2 cycle OPE there is more to consider.
If you use your machine almost every week using E10 gas with some kind of stabilizer should not be an issue. At the End of season drain the gas completely or use E10 for that last fill up and you should be safe!
Again, what makes sense for one may not for another.:wink:
 

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All Good points above!
That is why every one has to assess their situation. If you use 1 gallon or less a year it may be worth it depending on other options in your area. Some folks don't have other practical options for E0 gas. When it comes to 2 cycle OPE there is more to consider.
If you use your machine almost every week using E10 gas with some kind of stabilizer should not be an issue. At the End of season drain the gas completely or use E10 for that last fill up and you should be safe!
Again, what makes sense for one may not for another.:wink:
I know this post was a few days ago, but I just wanted to keep people from getting confused. I think you may have meant to type, "At the End of season drain the gas completely or use E0 for that last fill up and you should be safe!"

If I'm wrong let me know...
 

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Personally, I get a fresh 5 gallon gas can of 93 octane E0 and immediately put stabilizer and a splash of gas dryer in it. The 5 gallons is usually enough to get me through the winter, and whatever is left over come spring gets captured in the jug and goes into a vehicle. I like to run the engine dry and spray the carb and clean the bowl. Going on 20 years with this practice (snow blower is from 1977) and it runs perfect. Tecumseh HM80 sno-king for the record.
 

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that's a valid point. Yet- I kind of feel this has come a full circle.. if you fill up your gas can and then throw in some stabil.. You're good for a year.
I would not trust *any* gas for a year, not even ethanol-free gas, and certainty not gas with ethanol in it, regardless of any stabilizer product used..that's just far too long.
I get my gas one gallon at a time, summer and winter.
In the summer, I probably use a gallon every 2 or 3 weeks for mowing.
In the winter, I probably burn 2 to 4 gallons for the whole winter, over the course of 5 months, depending on the winter.
either way, I buy a gallon of gas on average probably about once a month..which isnt a big deal, and that way im always assured its rather fresh.
I have an ethanol-free gas station not too far away, so I use that, plus seafoam every time.

Scot
 

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I would not trust *any* gas for a year, not even ethanol-free gas, and certainty not gas with ethanol in it, regardless of any stabilizer product used..that's just far too long.
I get my gas one gallon at a time, summer and winter.
In the summer, I probably use a gallon every 2 or 3 weeks for mowing.
In the winter, I probably burn 2 to 4 gallons for the whole winter, over the course of 5 months, depending on the winter.
either way, I buy a gallon of gas on average probably about once a month..which isnt a big deal, and that way im always assured its rather fresh.
I have an ethanol-free gas station not too far away, so I use that, plus seafoam every time.

Scot
How do you use the seafoam? Is it in place or in addition to a preservative such as sta-bil? How much?

I seafoamed a car by pouring some into a vacuum line. Curious of how it would be used as a gas additive. Does it smoke?
 

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I use 1 ounce per Gallon on all my OPE. Per the directions on the back of the can. Engines seem to run smoother. I never use stabilizer, but also run only High test. Leftover winter gas goes in the lawnmower, leftover summer gas goes in the blower. works just fine. Both start on first pull.
 

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During the summer months I buy 5 gallons of E10 (I don't have a choice in my very liberal state) every 3 weeks for my lawn tractor. I treat it with 3oz.-5oz. of Seafoam just to keep the carburetor clean, not to keep the gas from going bad. This year I think I am going to change how I store it for the winter. I'm going to buy Trufuel, pour it in my tank with a bit of Seafoam, and run it dry. Usually, I do the same procedure with E10, but add much more Seafoam than recommended. It has always worked in the past, but for just $6.00 for a can of Trufuel, I believe it is well worth the change.

Just this past weekend, I needed to buy some gas for my 2 cycle leaf blower and weed whacker. Knowing this fuel will need to be stored all winter and into the summer next year, I actually removed the Ethanol myself. I simply added about 5oz of water to 2 gallons for 89 octane E10. I then shook it like crazy and removed about 25oz. - 30oz. of Ethanol and water. This probably didn't remove all of the Ethanol, but it probably got 90%. Finally, after this was all done, I added an ounce of Sta-bil and 2oz of Seafoam. I'm confident that this fuel will last into next summer and not cause any problems.

This winter I will treat the fuel for my snow blower similarly to how I treat the gas from my lawn tractor. I will buy 5 gallons of E10 and treat it with 5oz. of Seafoam and 1oz. of Sta-bil. This will keep the carburetor clean and the gas from going bad. Come spring, I will store my snowblower by running Trufuel through the lines and carburetor with about an ounce of Seafoam too. This should help keep the carburetor clean and ensure a great start next winter.

So, the moral of the story is, I think how often the equipment gets run and how long the gas will need to be stored are both important factors when thinking about how to treat the gas. The longer the storage, especially, means the less Ethanol the better.
 

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How do you use the seafoam? Is it in place or in addition to a preservative such as sta-bil? How much?

I seafoamed a car by pouring some into a vacuum line. Curious of how it would be used as a gas additive. Does it smoke?
As Taurus said: "1 ounce per Gallon , i use it as recommended on the can"
thats how I use it too..
I use no other gas additive, only Seafoam, I use it on ethanol-free gas.
It doesn't smoke.
I have been using ever since:

http://gold.mylargescale.com/scottychaos/ariens/Page11.html#question4

that sold me on it. One bottle of Seafoam lasts me several years, probably 2 or 3 years.
I use it for the snowblower and the lawn mowers. (I have a push Craftsman mower, and the 1964 Wheel Horse garden tractor with a mowing deck, and its original Kohler engine.)

Scot
 

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Good to know about the seafoam in the fuel. I watched a few videos of some guy actually scoping his lawnmower cylinder before and after a seafoam treatment through the carb intake. It did have some effect on reducing carbon, but it wasn't dramatic. I suspect having it in the fuel will reduce the rate of carbon being deposited.
 
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