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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all.

First time posting. Last year my electric greenworks bit the dust and this year I upgraded to Deluxe 24. Just had a chance to use it last week. We got 6 inches of fluffy stuff. It worked great, still getting use to the controls though.
My property is very small and I can't throw snow very far. I have neighbors everywhere within spitting distance
After I was done

http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=123986&thumb=1

Here is a closeup of the machine
http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=123994&thumb=1

I adjusted this part:
http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=124002&thumb=1

and it seems i ran out of distance to adjust even more down.

http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=124010&thumb=1

Anything else I can do to lower the discharge distance and angle?

Thank you

Alex
 

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My machine has a different setup, so I can't help with adjustments, sorry.

But perhaps you could add another angled flap at the end of the tilting portion of the chute? Something to help deflect the snow further down. Just like a flat piece of metal along the top of the tilting portion, at the end, bent down to aim the snow further down.

Alternately, if the tilting portion does have more ability to move (like it's not banging into the top of the long vertical chute), then maybe adjustments/modifications could gain you a little more tilt.
 

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Just fashion yourself some type of cowl deflector for the end, paint it orange or black, then weld or drill and bolt it on the tip end of the chute. This will give you even more down direction. Or just cut the corner seams bend it down even farther and weld it. Take it off and bring it to a local welding shop... easy peasy for them ...
 

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A little tip I use it to point the chute more forward and less at 90 degrees to the side. By throwing it forward and just a little to the side you use up some of the distance.
 

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lower the throttle
That will work, however,

1. A lot of new equipment doesn't come with a throttle.
2. The engine is cooled and lubricated by running. Slowing it down will lower the amount if air cooling it as well as the amount of oil being splashed around.
3. Because of the above it is generally recommended to run an engine at full throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That will work, however,

1. A lot of new equipment doesn't come with a throttle.
2. The engine is cooled and lubricated by running. Slowing it down will lower the amount if air cooling it as well as the amount of oil being splashed around.
3. Because of the above it is generally recommended to run an engine at full throttle.
The one I have does have throttle control. I'll to lower it a bit and see if it helps.
 

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I agree, these small engines were meant to run at full throttle. Also, running at 1/2 throttle will give you much less auger and impeller action.
 

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From your fourth pixx.....

Adjust / thread those nuts on the cable to the other end of assembly .....
Not the tip where they are now, but the inch or so you can see in the pixx. That should give you a bit more pull on the cable. But I'm thinking your deflector will bottom out on the chute and cable will be at the end of movement, and or it will STOP maximum upward movement.

To adjust for maximum downward travel I would first move dashboard control lever to full downward position...
Loosen the nuts, thread to each end of the threaded portion of that cable, each nut will be at the beginning of thier threads on this assembly...
Then with one elbow push down on deflector as far as it will move, then adjust nuts so cable is tight or as much as your threads will allow. I'm guessing that on the dashboard end of cable there is no adjustment.
Let us know how you make out with your adjustments.
 

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I wouldn't necessarily do anything at this time, particularly regarding modifications. Give yourself a few more snowfalls before you make any substantial decisions. Instead, I'd adjust my pattern, as follows:

1. Change the chute direction to blow somewhat parallel to your neighbors instead of directly toward them.
2. Blow your snow in a direction / pattern away from your neighbors, even if it means redoing some of your driveway or sidewalk.
3. Clean your area first and when no one's watching.
4. If you feel guilty, clean your neighbor, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
From your fourth pixx.....

Adjust / thread those nuts on the cable to the other end of assembly .....
Not the tip where they are now, but the inch or so you can see in the pixx. That should give you a bit more pull on the cable. But I'm thinking your deflector will bottom out on the chute and cable will be at the end of movement, and or it will STOP maximum upward movement.

To adjust for maximum downward travel I would first move dashboard control lever to full downward position...
Loosen the nuts, thread to each end of the threaded portion of that cable, each nut will be at the beginning of thier threads on this assembly...
Then with one elbow push down on deflector as far as it will move, then adjust nuts so cable is tight or as much as your threads will allow. I'm guessing that on the dashboard end of cable there is no adjustment.
Let us know how you make out with your adjustments.
Let me visual these first so I fully understand. Thank you
 

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Deflector control issue

Hello all-

Have a Platinum 24 SHO that I purchased in January 2016. It has been quite the snow beast as it sucks up and spits out ANY snow thrown at it.

My issue is the chute deflector control. When I move the hand control all the way front (making close to 90 degree angle) it works as it should. The problem is that once it's all the way down or front, it will not return back to a straight up position to allow snow to shoot up high. I have looked into making the adjustments on the nuts that pertain to the deflector to no avail. The machine has barely been used and is in mint condition so I am guessing this is a common problem and am hoping others have experienced this or know what can be done to correct the issue?

Tried uploading pics but no matter what I do, they are too big for the forums and I only am using a phone camera and cant make them the size required. Ughh.

Thanks all!

-Jason
 

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It could be rubbing on the lower chute section and then the spring is not strong enough. Or, is the spring hooked up correctly ?
 

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lower the throttle
That will work, however,
1. A lot of new equipment doesn't come with a throttle.
Usually because the manufacturer is too cheap. A paddle blower has no throttle but why would you need one?

2. The engine is cooled and lubricated by running. Slowing it down will lower the amount if air cooling it as well as the amount of oil being splashed around.
3. Because of the above it is generally recommended to run an engine at full throttle.
What manufacturer recommends to run full throttle for the specific well being of an engine?
 

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The chute and deflector exert a slight pressure between them, so prying the deflector sides away from the chute sides worked to make the deflector more responsive. The spring is not very strong and I had already stiffened it, but reducing the deflector side pressure on the chute makes a huge difference.
 

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I think all manufacturers recommend full throttle, but they word it for proper equipment performance rather than well being of the engine. I agree with Shryp that the well being of these engines needs full throttle for all work. The idle setting (if 2,000 rpm could be called idle) is handy for short periods while leaving the machine.

Robert at Honda made a post on the Honda forum where he supported full throttle use and asked why anyone would use a lower throttle setting for work. A number of users do actually use part throttle to control snow discharge. Not everyone has the same opinion on use of full throttle for snowblower work.
 

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I think all manufacturers recommend full throttle, but they word it for proper equipment performance rather than well being of the engine.
That would be a correct statement for when a manufacturer of any piece of equipment in advertising claims throwing distance, tons/hr, acres mowed or travel speed it would be at full throttle.

I agree with Shryp that the well being of these engines needs full throttle for all work. The idle setting (if 2,000 rpm could be called idle) is handy for short periods while leaving the machine.
Yeah but what evidence that it is detrimental? Historically, small air cooled engines have been governed to run between 2800-3450RPM and I have been putting a tach to small engines for over thirty years and working with them much longer. The Honda is rated to run and operate on a piece of machinery at anywhere from 2000RPM and up. Do you know what purpose all the small holes on a governor arm are for? Here from a 1962 B&S publication. Engines are designed to run anywhere in their operating range without fear of this burning up, overheating, lack of lubrication thinking.

Robert at Honda made a post on the Honda forum where he supported full throttle use and asked why anyone would use a lower throttle setting for work.
Prolly because he is a PR guy and the technical intricacies are not his bag. The faster an engine runs the more heat it generates.
 

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Driverider, The air created by full throttle and shroudings is directed over the engine to keep it within operating temps. Overall the design is to keep air flowing as a temp control for the parts that are not directly involved in oil lubrication. Idle on the bench is quite different from idling with a hood closed on a garden tractor running a hydro in Texas or in the humidity of a MI summer. There is difference with pressurized oiling systems, but the splash system needs the air flow to defeat the outside heat of the non directly lubricated metal parts. Snowblowers get a break with their obvious exposure, but it still needs cooling that can and will be along the points of no return. Too slow, no cooling, too high can't cool enough. It's a freshman engineering class problem. There's an entire school of failure recommendations of why one side of Onan's failed when people were "taking it easy on the engine" with low throttle position use.
 
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