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I was looking around and could not find this. Please excuse me if it's been answered.


What do you do with your machine after you snowblower? do you clean it out? if so how?

I tend to just put it in my shed caked full of snow in the auger housing (I'm not sure if this is the best practice.).
I close the fuel valve and run out the carb and she's waiting for the next snow fall.
 

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I think you should do your best to get that snow out of the auger housing. Having the impeller freeze up could shred your belts. Having the auger freeze could blow your shear pins or worse, tear up the gear box. If you use it again before it melts of course.

Shear pins are an inconvenience. The other two are expensive.
 

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I think you should do your best to get that snow out of the auger housing. Having the impeller freeze up could shred your belts. Having the auger freeze could blow your shear pins or worse, tear up the gear box. If you use it again before it melts of course.

Shear pins are an inconvenience. The other two are expensive.

Hey John, thanks!

How do you clean yours out? Stick, Broom, Water?
 

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Small broom for me and then I scoop out the impeller with my hand the best I can. They say you should never stick your hand in there, but it’s obviously not a problem as long as it’s not “bound up”.
 

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Common sense rules apply.

You brush off what you can and park it , having it all prepped for the next round … Of course having a compressor with an air gun helps if you so choose.
 

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I brush off what i can easily reach and wipe off where the broom doesn't reach. I've used the pokey stick that came with it to knock the snow loose from the auger - the last few storms it was warm enough later in my garage to melt the snow off that was left (as long as you don't mind a small puddle)

same applies for the single stage as with the 2 stage.
 

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I think you should do your best to get that snow out of the auger housing. Having the impeller freeze up could shred your belts. Having the auger freeze could blow your shear pins or worse, tear up the gear box. If you use it again before it melts of course.

Shear pins are an inconvenience. The other two are expensive.
agree 1000%

also before i use mine again i make sure i can move impeller by hand ( with engine off ) to make not froze up.
 

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I brush as much snow as possible, turn the bucket into the sun (if it's out), use my leaf blower or air compressor to get the rest and dry it as best I can before putting it in the shed.
 

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I clean it out as well as possible then I use a small space heater inside the bucket to melt and dry everything. Been doing it for years. I even have some plywood that I place around it to hold the heat in. Works great.
 

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I use a brush for cleaning the snow off of cars to clean off any snow, especially around the augers and impeller. BTW, it is a long handled brush.
 

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I clean it out as well as possible then I use a small space heater inside the bucket to melt and dry everything. Been doing it for years. I even have some plywood that I place around it to hold the heat in. Works great.
I do the same but I use a cardboard box to help keep the heat in. I also picked up one of those remote controlled outlets so I don't have to go back out and unplug the space heater seeing that my garage is not attached to the house
 

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i just run the augers for a few seconds before i shut the engine off so there is nothing in the impeller or in the augers ways. never had an issue. most snowblowers usually have hole in the bottom of the impeller housing so smaller amounts of snow should melt and drip out if it every warms up. i have had to replace a few belts for people who haven't cleaned out their impeller housings.
 

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I used to use the methods similar to those described above until about 2 years ago. Things and methods changed after I got a real good deal on an Ingersoll Rand T30 (5HP) stand alone compressor. It is my garage and I piped it along the wall using 1/2'' black iron pipe to an air outlet and also via hose to a ball valve attached to the water feed line in my basement.

Now I just wash everything with fresh water using a garden hose. Later I connect compressed air to the water line and purge it. No frozen pipes/hose and a clean snowblower.
 

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I take an clean broom and sweep it off as good as I can then bring it into a heated garage to drip dry on a cardboard pallet. I take a damp cloth and go around the engine and housing while I'm at it.
 

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I do have an old straw broom I use to clean them off, I guess the main thing is to make sure anything that moves, choke, levers etc... don't freeze on you. I also park it in the garage on a rubber floor mat so if it happens to warm up enough to melt the rest off it's not resting in a pool of water, saves on scraper bars.
 

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If it's somewhat sunny after I'm finished, I clean mine up a bit and leave the snow blower out for an hour or so. Then I finish cleaning after the snow thaws and refill. Refilling after use is important to help avoid gasoline problems because moisture in the fuel tank can be harmful to gasoline so refilling reduces the potential for moisture buildup.
 

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I keep one of these in the garage right next to the snowblower:

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=bench+brush

(easy to find at Home Depot, Lowes, etc)

When im done, I stop the snowblower in the driveway, turn off the machine, engine off, then brush away as much snow as possible..
off the engine, handlebars, levers and controls, top and sides of the bucket, and also get inside the bucket to the augers, down into the chute, manually clear away as much as possible..(cant get it 100%, but can get 80% to 90% anyway.)

Inside the bucket, I make sure the snow is clear from the top of the side bearings where the augers meet the bucket sides, and the top of the gearbox, so snow cant melt, drip, then re-freeze in those areas.

Then, fire it back up, turn on the augers and impeller again to shoot out any remaining loose snow..then back in the garage.

This gets most of the snow cleared off, which will minimize (or eliminate) any melting and re-freezing problems..you dont things frozen up with ice the next time you go to use the machine..and if the snow melts in your garage, brushing off 90% of the snow prevents a giant puddle of water on your garage floor. (compared to if you didn't remove the snow at all)

So, its definitely a good thing to do! for several reasons.

Scot
 

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Park it in the heated garage and sweep the water out later... I can't imagine storing the blower packed with snow, not good for all the reasons listed.
 
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