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Large compacted drifts that a blower is having trouble entering can quickly and easily be knocked down with a long handled transfer shovel or ice scraper. This is much easier on the operators body and the machine. It is usually faster as well.
 
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First of all it happened so the advice to not let it happen is 20/20 hindsight.

One of the things you can do is get some tools (depends on what you have, aka various shovels and ice chippers) and break it up ahead of you.

Blow what you can or get a lane then back out and chip off the face, repeat until you get to the goal line.

Per tabora, smaller attempts and back out and clear the stuff that is under mahcine fallen behind.
 

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Interesting that nobody has recommended trying 4th gear, ain't it?

You definitely could damage it ramming into things, particular at the bucket to frame connection. The metal isn't very thick there on newer units in general. You can crack/tear/break the sheet metal, usually on the bucket, and then the next thing you know you're wondering why it keeps throwing belts.

You could upgrade to one of these...
 

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Take your time. I would make a cut in parallel with your house first. Then go back and whittle it away wider, perhaps one third to a half a bucket width at a time, until you've moved the offending deeper snow. Shovels or drift cutters can be your friend.
 

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I never clean the snow right up to the foundation for two reasons.
1 Clearing snow too close allows the frost into the ground and can cause issues with the foundation.
2 The snow acts as an insulator and helps keep the heat bill down.
I like to leave at least 3 or 4 feet of snow next to the house. A little more is better if you have the room.
 

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Toon, i would have thought that potential snow melt along the foundation could lead to freeze and thaw cycles against the foundation potentially causing damage.
It's best if your foundation is insulated to the point that there is no or little snow melt from the foundation, and if the foundation does melt your snow, the small amount of water will travel downwards and away from the building in the weeping tile system.
The snow most times will actually only touch the building near the snow surface creating a slight void next to the foundation lower down. Trapped air and no wind against the foundation is a good way to save energy dollars.
This melt water your mentioning isn't as much of a problem as you might think, because it takes an awful lot of snow melt to make any amount of water. I have personal experience with that, as I am old enough and poor enough as a child to have had to bring in snow to be melted on the wood stove to fill our bathtub. It took forever.
 

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As others have mentioned, I think you are over clearing. Not sure where you are, but I purposefully keep the snow on the ground to minimize ground freezing and prevent it from getting under my foundation . And I will never even allow anybody to walk over my septic line, tank, and leach field. May not be a big deal if you are in a more moderate climate.
 
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