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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a small ultrasonic, never used. Considering using it to clean dirty carbs instead of ordering replacements. Anyone do this, and any tips?
 

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I have a small one I use mostly for cleaning the two stroke cube carbs. I use warm/hot water with a few drops of Dawn dish soap or Simple Green cleaner. When I was a teenager, we would remove the rubber and plastic parts and stick them in boiling water.
 

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I bought one to clean the carb on the old HS50 and once all of the screws were removed to get it broken down to single parts it worked magnificently. It even removed some rust from some drill press parts on another project. (y) (y)

Kitchen appliance Product Home appliance Fluid Tableware

Start of cleaning.


Kitchen appliance Product Home appliance Grille Fluid

Showing dirt in water after first clean cycle.

If your wondering why there is a coffee cup in there, it contains the cleaning fluid and the rest of the ultrasonic washer can be filled wit plain water. Saves cleaner fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
like to give it a try. i know we can get $15 aftermarket carbs, but i would like to keep the original on some things, and if you need several carbs, that $15 plus time can add up.

my USC came with a solution for jewelry, watches, etc. should i avoid using that? i've also read about using de-ionized water.
 

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Unless your water is really dirty I would not think deionized water is necessary, and simple green worked just as good as the $52 gallon of cleaning fluid I bought.
 

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I've used one of the 2.5 L cleaners from HF for the past 6 - 7 years. It has worked well for me, though I only use it 3 - 4 times each year. I typically start with warm (not hot) water to save time on the heating cycle, and usually use few squirts of Dawn dish soap. The timer will only run for about 8 - 10 minutes at a time, so if you wish to clean something for longer that can be annoying.

I do try to brush off as much grease and oil beforehand so as not to mess up the cleaning solution immediately.

I haven't used anything more than dish soap, but do hear things like Simple Green work fine. There is a formulation of Simple Green that is safe for aluminum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
An ultrasonic virgin no more! Did two rounds of distilled water and dawn, used a tip cleaner tool, dried the carb with my heat gun, installed, and it fired up after several pulls. Revelation. The carbs are lined up for their bubble baths!!
 

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I keep meaning to pick up an ultrasonic cleaner, but never really followed through ....

LOL, I probably have a dozen or more old ones on a shelf that I could probably take apart, clean and re-assemble.

On my to do list ...... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I keep meaning to pick up an ultrasonic cleaner, but never really followed through ....

LOL, I probably have a dozen or more old ones on a shelf that I could probably take apart, clean and re-assemble.

On my to do list ...... :)
do it, you can knock em all out in one night watching reruns of the curse of oak island (if you don't fall asleep from boredom)!
 

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the biggest problem i find is if they are bad enough that they need to be ultrasonically cleaned they generally need a carb kit because the seals are dried out and generally the carb kit with new seals cost about the same as just replacing it with a aftermarket carb and for the most part aftermarket carbs seem to be pretty decent in most cases. i have also heard boiling the carb in water can help remove stubborn crud which is why the better cleaners have a heater
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
the biggest problem i find is if they are bad enough that they need to be ultrasonically cleaned they generally need a carb kit because the seals are dried out and generally the carb kit with new seals cost about the same as just replacing it with a aftermarket carb and for the most part aftermarket carbs seem to be pretty decent in most cases. i have also heard boiling the carb in water can help remove stubborn crud which is why the better cleaners have a heater
don't rain on my parade, crazzy!
 

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just thinking logically. i have dealt with many damaged seals and if you can't find a good used one off another machine it generally sucks to spend $20 on a seal kit when you can get a complete carb.
 
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