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Same as the title, most of the power snowblower used friction wheel and disc (see picture) to drive the Blower Auger. Are there any other methods like motor clutch or even Overheating protection?

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Adam

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High-end snowblowers (Honda, etc.) use a hydrostatic drive axle. This is similar to the unit used in zero-turn mowers, and usually allows steering by disconnecting power to one track/wheel on the fly, or freewheeling both of them to move the machine around easily without power on newer models.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
High-end snowblowers (Honda, etc.) use a hydrostatic drive axle. This is similar to the unit used in zero-turn mowers, and usually allows steering by disconnecting power to one track/wheel on the fly, or freewheeling both of them to move the machine around easily without power on newer models.
Thanks.
I checked the hydrostatic drive axle, it is a amazing design. I didn't find a simple principle introduction yet.

for my project, I used a DC motor directly drive the auger which is very easily stuck in a heavy snow.

hydrostatic drive axle sure can solve my problem, just seems it is too luxury here?

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Thanks.
I checked the hydrostatic drive axle, it is a amazing design. I didn't find a simple principle introduction yet.

for my project, I used a DC motor directly drive the auger which is very easily stuck in a heavy snow.

hydrostatic drive axle sure can solve my problem, just seems it is too luxury here?

Best
it depends on how much you need a snowblower and how trouble free you want the transmission to be. where I live we can get about 200-500 or more inches a year and the predominate blower is the Honda.

The older HS Honda models have a very strong hydro static transmission that rarely fails. I have worked on hundreds of Honda's and have yet seen one with a failure. Except if one of the rubber seals blows out and the oil leaks out. In that case you just push seal back in or replace seal, bleed system and add new oil and you are good to go.

yes. expensive but you can get an excellent used Honda in the 500-1500 range with patience that can last 20-30-40 years or more with proper use and maintenance.

The friction disk system on Honda's work great as long as maintained and adjustments are correct. The disk if needs replacing is fairly cheap and not too hard to install. The main problem with Honda ( only brand I work on ) friction disk systems is not the system but the final drive gearbox that turns the wheels or tracks. some parts are no longer available and you can not rebuild gearbox if needed.

Not sure, but I dont think that is a problem with most brands that still use the friction disk drive.
 

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I don't know of any snowblowers that use the friction disc to drive the auger, they all drive the impeller shaft (and therefore the auger) via a pulley from the engine. Did you mean powering the drive wheels? If so, then Tabora described it. What problem are you trying to solve? The friction disc system has been proven very reliable over decades in these applications.

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I checked the hydrostatic drive axle, it is a amazing design. I didn't find a simple principle introduction yet.

for my project, I used a DC motor directly drive the auger which is very easily stuck in a heavy snow.

hydrostatic drive axle sure can solve my problem, just seems it is too luxury here?
what voltage motor are you trying to run? i would guess if you are running at less then 48V a conversion like it sounds like you are trying to do will never work. you need the higher voltage for the torque. looks like snow joe uses 2 electric motors to run theirs. 1 for the auger and 1 for the impeller.
 

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Couple of things that may be of use to you. Back in the 60's there was a blower that used what appeared to be a centrifugal clutch on the auger similar to what was used on Go-carts. Murray built machines with a Tecumseh transmission back in the 70's that were sold under the Craftsman label. It's a fairly solid unit, in fact it was used in various machines including snow blowers, garden tractors etc.
 

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I wasn't going to say this, but I don't think it is a good idea for you to go electric.
The Snowjoe is too lightweight to have good traction on snow. Like most electric lawn equipment, they are under power. They would run hot and burn themselves out. You would need a very powerful motor, and huge batteries (like the ones on electric cars) to make it powerful like gas engine. It is dangerous with high voltage.
One guy on Youtube used 240 volts, plugged directly into his house power outlet and he only got decent performance from it. Not to mention, he had to drag extension cord around his yard.
You think you can do better than that, then go ahead. There is a reason, why most people still using and preferring gas powered snowblowers.
The Snowjoe is the closest one that you can find on the market, so why waste your times.
 

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You would need a very powerful motor, and huge batteries (like the ones on electric cars) to make it powerful like gas engine. It is dangerous with high voltage.
it could still likely be done. i don't know if they cost is worth it but have you seen the electric motocycles? the motors on are not that big and would likely have more than enough torque/power to throw snow. the size of the ones on the snow joe units are likely up to the job of moving snow. technology is definitely getting better in that aspect.
 
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