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Discussion Starter #1
While snow blowing the EOD, I have had many close calls with vehicles. I now wear reflective clothing similar to this. I also have refelctive tape on the machine . When I have time , I will be adding led running lights to the machine.


 

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Ditto. Never too much visibility near the street and around town. I wear the same and have reflective tape everywhere its practical. My truck is usually at the street where I unload with an amber strobe light on the roof and 4 ways on. Ive been doing commercial for many years now and like you I have had some close calls. Can be down right scary out there.
Ive been looking at ways to add strobes on the blower but have not found a way that it would work without shining in my face.
 

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moving to a house on a busy street has defiantly got me thinking about getting something like this especially when get the snoblower going on the tractor I'm thinking about getting some strobe lights for it.
 

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Our road is rural so the cars are usually going by "fast" and while blowing about a week ago I was reminded of the risk.


I was about half-way down the main run of our driveway so I was still over 100 yrd's from the road when I saw a SUV start to slide and end up going into the ditch almost right across from the end of our driveway. That's been my biggest concern while down there, someone losing control and taking me out so I always stop and watch as cars pass by.


What I wear when down there is one of those yellow, mesh, vests with reflective stripes, the same style our youngest son wears while working as an Electrical Lineman, although his is FR (Fire Resistant.) They are lightweight, easy to put on and take off over my snow blowing coat and costs under $10. On top of that they dry off fast........


I have a couple and prefer the type with the zipper, as opposed to Velcro, which tends to stick to the mesh of the vest when putting it on.


https://www.jharlen.com/p-11752-class-2-safety-vest-zip-front.aspx
 

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I wear my black jacket. So that goes against the white snow and then the fact my machine has a light and throws snow 40ft in the air may make people notice me
 

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This is very sad.

GRAND TRAVERSE COUNTY, Mich., (WPBN/WGTU — A 25-year-old Kingsley man was killed while snowblowing his driveway Wednesday evening.

It happened around 5:40 p.m. on Voice Road between Garfield and Summit Road.

According to the Grand Traverse County Sheriff's Department, a 29-year-old Maple City woman lost control of her car and left the road. She hit the man, dragging him into a ditch.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Please think safety when you're out in the snow. Between slippery roadways and blinding snow, anything you do near traffic has the potential to be hazardous.

Yesterday evening in Topsfield, 59-year-old Edgar Rhodes was struck by a truck as he was snowblowing the end of his driveway. He was killed instantly.
The trucks driver was treated at the scene and a passenger was not injured.

Out of this tragic story comes a wake-up call. Situational awareness. Whether you're clearing your driveway after a storm or walking along the road, always be mindful of where you are in relationship to traffic. It's much harder to stop or even have control in a vehicle when the streets are icy. Don't assume you're safe just because you're not in a travel lane. It only takes a fraction of a second for an otherwise good day to turn deadly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
PROSPECT, CT (WFSB) -
An elderly woman from Prospect, who was killed in a hit-and-run during Blizzard Charlotte on Friday has been identified as Mary McCormack.

According to Connecticut State Police, the 79-year-old woman was snow blowing her driveway when she was hit on Straitsville Road.

As of Monday morning, police had not located the driver of the vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There are many more. One is too many !!!! Always be aware of your surroundings. Don't assume they see you. Get the job done safely and return to the safety of your home. That is my goal.
 

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FWIW, I wear a bright orange vest and place 2 1/2 foot tall road cones wrapped with reflective tape in the road at the end of the driveway, it helps slow them down, but I still worry about some dolt texting or whatever and not watching the road.

My next planned upgrade is a strobe like light for on top of the road cones.

K
 

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There are many more. One is too many !!!! Always be aware of your surroundings. Don't assume they see you. Get the job done safely and return to the safety of your home. That is my goal.
I have something called a halo that blinks orange like the plow trucks has 5 alternating patterns to choose from
super bright at night it has a magnet on it i put it on the pull start to be seen from the rear
i love the thing
 

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It was stated well in a few posts back ... At Amtrak we were drilled in the same manner, Situational Awareness. This falls into everyday life, no matter what you are doing, always being aware of your surroundings and taking the necessary precautions to protect life and limb. Snow, slippery roads, high snow banks, drifts, etc.. etc, ... I myself always were reflective clothing, blinking red LED arm bands, (like for biking) and look all around before getting anywhere near the road ... cars kill ....
 

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That's a county right next to mine, and the lady who hit him is from my county...:sad2:

I've had two close calls, with one being waaaay too close – an SUV came up from behind me and by the time I saw and heard it, it was swerving right past me, then onto the other side of the road and almost lost it. It kept going and never stopped or turned around.

I'm at the top of a small hill, on a 5 mile gravel road that is used as a by-pass for a lot of people...they just fly.

This is very sad.

GRAND TRAVERSE COUNTY, Mich., (WPBN/WGTU — A 25-year-old Kingsley man was killed while snowblowing his driveway Wednesday evening.

It happened around 5:40 p.m. on Voice Road between Garfield and Summit Road.

According to the Grand Traverse County Sheriff's Department, a 29-year-old Maple City woman lost control of her car and left the road. She hit the man, dragging him into a ditch.
 

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i have done everything suggested in the previous posts. Nothing works 100% of the time and it's almost impossible to be aware 100% of the time.

I was a truck driver for over 30 years and had several close calls on the side of the highway trying to put my chains on. a couple times i had to dive under the trailer to avoid a 4 wheeler flying too close by.

One of the safest drivers i had the pleasure to work with gave me the best advice on how to be safer and that was to park so the rear end of the trailer was slightly sticking out so that you had the trailer between you and the oncoming traffic.

not 100% foolproof but close. I use the same principle with my driveway. before doing the EOD , i will park my toyota truck on the side of the road up traffic before i do it. if someone starts sliding or comes too close they will hit the truck. it is between me and the EOD.

some people seem annoyed since drivers have to slightly move over. and once in awhile ( rarely ) do I have to move it for the plow as usually they have already come down and i am doing the berm. i don't care if people get annoyed. I am mostly safe doing it this way.

With the noise of the blower and the operator trying to focus on the work at hand , it is not safe being distracted by traffic going by. My truck slightly in the way gives me more peace of mind while blowing. I don't feel it is a hazard to other drivers. It makes them more aware and forces them to slow the **** down.
 

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i have done everything suggested in the previous posts. Nothing works 100% of the time and it's almost impossible to be aware 100% of the time.

So true! When Ian, our youngest, was an Apprentice Electrical Lineman one of his duties was putting the safety cones out behind his truck when parked along the road. He always put out more than the "norm" and took some ribbing from The Journeymen who called him "Cone Boy." Ian said he didn't care, he saw what kind of drivers were out there.


One day he put out his extra cones and was glad he did. He was still living here at the time and when he got home that day I asked how his day went and he pulled out his phone to show me some photos of a car smashed into the back of a bucket truck.


He said he was getting something off of the back of the truck when he heard, whump, whump, whump and without looking jumped up into the back of the truck just before the car hit it. He said that as he jumped up there his body turned so he could see the car coming and there was a woman driving it holding up her phone and looking at it. She didn't even know what was going on until she hit the truck............


He did receive some minor injuries that day and was taken to the Hospital to get checked over and as time went on not only did those Journeymen quit calling him "Cone Boy," they made sure that he put out extra cones when they set up. He's a Journeyman now, working in Southern California and I'm sure he's still putting out those "extra cones."
 
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