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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have an Ariens 10995 that I got from a barn estate sale. There was no gas or oil in it. No clue how old it is or how it was treated. The electric start works. Gas is leaking from the carburetor. The spark plug is wet but has spark. If I engage or disengage (forgot what one) the side handle, the front auger spins. The unit just doesn't actually turn on.

How can I replace the carburetor on this? Where would I get one or a part number? I think I'd need new cables and stuff too.

How do I get the motor off so I can just replace it with an entire new motor? Would this just be easier? What would a good replacement be?
 

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Sharing details of the engine (make and model number, at least) would help. You'd also need that info to figure out the carburetor's part number.

The engine may have studs coming up through it from the main frame. There might be nuts holding it down. Or the engine might bolt down into the frame.

You can probably replace the engine completely, but that's a process unto itself. You'd need to check whether the engine has 1 output shaft, or 2. Then you'd need to determine the crankshaft height from the bottom of the engine, and the crankshaft diameter. In an ideal world, you'd want to find an engine that matches those, to minimize modifications/changes that are required. But I wouldn't jump straight to this solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
How do I find out make and model? I dont see a sticker. I just realized the 10995 isnt it. I have pictures of the engine and carburetor that I took out. Would that help? Edit: looking through my pictures, I think I found the tag. It looks like the engine was made by Ariens. I can get the model number tomorrow. Although this sticker might be the same one that is on the other side of the unit.


The engine appears to have two bolts on each side and then one in the front. Looks like I could just remove those 5 bolts and swap an engine from Harbor Frieght with that same bolt pattern? Or is there more to it?
 

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I have cleaned carburetors simply by first removing the bottom cup that is held by one custom screw. Next I stretched a copper wire that fitted into the main valve (jet) that is usually located right in the center when looking into the carburetor's bottom. Jammed the wire into the valve, twisted a couple of times and then reassembled the bottom. That worked for me without having to remove the carburetor from the machine.

Now of course if the problem is fuel leaking all over the place, well then you might have to remove it. Most likely though the problem could be a stuck float.

There a tools available to clean torch nozzles that will work.
 

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Nah, you can pull the float and replace the seat from the bottom as well with just the bowl off. On older Tecumseh carbs, that 'custom screw' *IS* the main jet, and a single strand from a piece of stranded wire in it's small ports can really help as well.
 

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Hope you took pictures of the carb lever "trapeze". I leave mine in place always. I just "remove the carb only" and leave the lever assembly on the carb studs.

The engine plate is below the carb mounting spot to the right on the flywheel cover. As Scot mentions, the H70 engine data is on that plate, stamped vertically.
 

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Nah, you can pull the float and replace the seat from the bottom as well with just the bowl off. On older Tecumseh carbs, that 'custom screw' *IS* the main jet, and a single strand from a piece of stranded wire in it's small ports can really help as well.


My experience with the 'custom screw' which is used to secure the reservoir cup is from Honda and in the King's English, it ain't no main jet. You may be correct with the Tec's, no experience cleaning one of them. The video shows the guy removing the jet but heck, I just shoved the wire into mine while it remained in place. I guess the important thing to notice is how a simple wire can make life much easier than ripping the engine apart.


 

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I went through a similar experience last winter with a neighbor's 'inherited' Sears blower. I was going to buy a re-build kit, but soon realized the carb was beyond help. I used this site: Tecumseh Carburetor parts, diagram, manual, troubleshoot guide | Tecumseh Carburetor Guide

to identify the carb, then bought a replacement from Amazon. It worked perfectly right out of the box, just had to setup the idle and high speed.
I suspect you have a Series 3 or 4 carb, check the screws on the choke/throttle plate.






Good luck, hope this helps.
 

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Nah, you can pull the float and replace the seat from the bottom as well with just the bowl off. On older Tecumseh carbs, that 'custom screw' *IS* the main jet, and a single strand from a piece of stranded wire in it's small ports can really help as well.


Tadawson --- I see from Wes' carburetor post 14 the 'screw' you were describing. That certainly does appear to likely govern fuel flow. Entirely different from the Honda I referenced. :thumbsup:
 

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Tadawson --- I see from Wes' carburetor post 14 the 'screw' you were describing. That certainly does appear to likely govern fuel flow. Entirely different from the Honda I referenced. :thumbsup:

Yup! Hondas have two screws on the bottom - one to retain the bowl, and the other a drain, and the jet screws in internally. On an older Techumseh, the body of the main needle (or jet if fixed) is the part that attaches the bowl as well, and there may or may not be a separate push button type device for a bowl drain. If adjustable, the needle then screws into that part . . . for a total of 5 parts - main jet body, needle, spring, small washer and an O ring . . .



- Tim
 

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That should be a series one carb. An H70-130067 should have an adjustable idle speed and high speed screw along with a choke lever and threaded holes on the outside of the carb for the primer choke button.

Here's a thread with what that carb should look like. Post #9 has some excellent images.

https://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/general-snowblower-discussion/845-1971-ariens-linkage-help-please.html

This one looks closer...it includes a gas bulb primer rig which you would not use. You'd probably have some fitting to do with the choke lever.


This is why I always rebuild the original carb. I know it's gonna fit.
 

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Not sure why he isn't rebuilding this one . . . other than having crap all over it that would likely clean off pretty easily, I don't see anything that would make me not want to . . . . as tlshawks noted, the one that is on it now is known to fit, and is also certain to not have any new defects due to 3rd world (lack of) quality control.
 

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Yeah, I know there's posters who believe in replacing. And I've seen carbs posted here that definitely were toast. I've bought replacements for gas trimmers and lawn mowers before, but always had trouble dialing them in.

They were always...touchy I'll call it.

I've simply had a lot of success rebuilding that series of carbs. One of them, the entire float bowl area was black from sitting for a decade. So, a complete removal and disassembly including welsh plugs, soaked a night in leftover Gumout spray cleaner, then a good toothbrush cleaning inside and out, Gumout spray cleaned thoroughly each passageway, then air compressor to everything. Then a full rebuild kit with a careful re-assembly and idle/high speed screw adjustments.

The 3 H50-H70 rebuilds I've done that to (effectively the exact same OEM Tec carb), all ran like a champ after.

More time consuming as far as "work time", but each time I was up and running in a day. Yes, I spent $10 extra doing it this way, but I've always considered it money well spent given that each ran awesome and trouble free after.

To each their own...
 

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My take is that unless the thottle or choke shafts are sloppy, or the body is corroded or mechanically damaged, you can rebuild it . . .
 
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