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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Two questions prior to storage for the summer.

I have gas with fuel stabilizer still sitting in blower. Do I just fire up the machine and let the machine run till it turns itself off when it runs out of gas ? Or do something else. Or more.

Oil- I bought the machine in March of 2019 and it was delivered at that time with oil. i didn’t assemble until November of 2019 and used twice in northeast only this past winter as we didn’t get a lot of snow. Therefore the oil has been sitting in the blower for a long time but hasn’t gotten used more than twice. Do I need to drain now or should this oil be good next season again and sitting in the blower all summer.
Last thing is I am clearly new to blower ownership as you can tell. So is there anything else I need to do before I forget about it in my garage for the off season? Thanks to all. This forum has been. A great resource so far.
 

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It'll be a debate on the oil, but although you have only 2 uses (2 hours? More?) I'd change the oil. The most amount of break-in metal particles in the oil accumulate in the first few hours of use. If it weren't so new, I'd have said that the oil will be fine. I have my first new snow thrower in 20 years, and I changed the oil Mid-winters after 4 hours of use.
The gas debate will be just as polarized. Personally, I'd siphon the tank, start the engine running it dry, and then drain the sediment bowl.
Others (I've done this with my lawn mower and pressure washer) will say that as long as the gas is stabilized, make sure the tank is topped off and walk away
The reason I drain the gas from the snow throw is that it will sit in my hot shed for 7 months, whereas my lawnmower and pressure washer sit still in the cold of the winter.
Good luck with the new machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I’m going to show how new I am to this but what’s the point in siphoning and then letting it run until it turns off vs just skipping the siphon and letting it run until it dies. Also what is draining the sediment bowl.

on the oil question I probably used for 30 mins each time. Maybe around an hour total. Otherwise the oil was never used.
 

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... And as for the rest of maintenance stuff, your probably fine.
I like to poke around, so I'd open it up, and if nothing else stare at the mechanics to understand them better. You could pull the wheels, pick up the keys that will drop out of the key ways, grease the axle shaft, put the keys back in and wheels on. They ship the axles dry, and if left that way they will eventually rust the wheels in place.
With only 2 uses, maintenance shouldn't really be an issue, but what else to do during a COVID-19 stay-at-home?
 

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"what’s the point in siphoning and then letting it run until it turns off vs just skipping the siphon and letting it run until it dies."
If it's only a tiny bit of gas. Nothing. I use the siphoned gas in my multitude of single cylinder engines.
 

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Your engine is brand new. It is breaking-in so, you do need to change that oil now (after the first few hours of used). It is what they recommended. You will see a lot of metal shaving in it. I would continue to do that a few more times to get all the metal shaving out. Oil is only good for one year, whether or, not you ran your snowblower that year. It is because, oil break down, collect moisture and become acidic overtime. Unlike cars, snowblower engines don't get rid of moisture very well. For that reason, oil came out of them are usually milkshake color, instead of black color. Now, if you missed an oil change, it is not going to hurt anything much. But, you are still in the break-in period.

Use a siphon pump to get all the gasoline out of the tank and then drain the rest of it in the carburetor bowl. To do that, you will need to remove the nut at the bottom of the bowl. If you aren't experienced with it, just run your snowblower until it run out of gas. It can takes a long time that way.

I like to remove the bowl to clean it and make sure all gasoline is out. A little bit of gasoline is okay, as it will evaporate.

Other than greasing, cleaning and maintaining your snowblower, you might want to put a block of wood at the bottom of the snowblower to jack up the wheels. Too much weight on the wheels will cause it to misshape (not rounded) the next year. At least, that is what I saw on cars if you let it sits for too long.

Pay attention to rust, so you can prevent it (paint, protective films, ...). Snowblower rust very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I understand now. The benefit to siphoning is either (1) to reuse the gas if I had a place to do so and/or (2) to save time in just running it until it turns off. I don’t know how long it would take to run itself out. There is probably half a tank of gas in there but these tanks aren’t that large.

on the oil issue, if I drain the oil should I have the new oil on hand and put that in now. Or just drain it and wait until before next winter to put the new oil in ?

sorry to all for a billion questions that seem basic but I am a real amateur and chatting on here sometimes makes more sense to me than reading the manuals
 

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I think I understand now. The benefit to siphoning is either (1) to reuse the gas if I had a place to do so and/or (2) to save time in just running it until it turns off. I don’t know how long it would take to run itself out. There is probably half a tank of gas in there but these tanks aren’t that large.

on the oil issue, if I drain the oil should I have the new oil on hand and put that in now. Or just drain it and wait until before next winter to put the new oil in ?

sorry to all for a billion questions that seem basic but I am a real amateur and chatting on here sometimes makes more sense to me than reading the manuals
You need to siphon gasoline out. Half a tank of gas will keep it running for more than half an hour (especially, when your snowblower is not blowing snow). Idling at high rpm for too long was never a good idea. Plus, your engine might run hot in this warm weather, and your neighbors will hate you.
 

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I would put oil in now as if you forget to check next winter and try to start it you will make a very expensive error so better safe than sorry, Use the Dino oil for this change and afte another few hours change it again and switch to synthetic and you should be good.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Not familiar with Dino vs synthetic. Was just gonna read the manual and see what it takes. I’ll have to do some research on that.

also to the poster who made the comment about my neighbors that’s a good point. Probably worth investing in a siphon. I have no other equipment beyond a blower that i would use it for so don’t want to spend a lot. But I can take a look online and probably find something
 

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Most small engines use 5w30 and SAE30 oil. Lawn mowers (summer equipment) can run both, but seem to prefer SAE30. You definitely need 5w30 for winter. Synthetic is not needed, since you only run your snowblower for a short season and then change it the next year. I use synthetic because it is supposed to last longer, but more expensive.
 

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I’m going to show how new I am to this but what’s the point in siphoning and then letting it run until it turns off vs just skipping the siphon and letting it run until it dies. Also what is draining the sediment bowl.

on the oil question I probably used for 30 mins each time. Maybe around an hour total. Otherwise the oil was never used.
It's up to you if you want to run it dry without siphoning the gas from tank. If tank is full, you'd have to run it at idle for quite some time, maybe a few hours. Makes no sense to me to waste that gas that could be dumped into a car or another device that could use it. Plus why give the engine extra wear and tear by running it quite a while? Takes me a few minutes to siphon the tank so no biggie IMHO. As to "draining the sediment bowl" they really meant the float bowl. That's at the bottom of the carb and is where the fuel is picked up to get sucked into the carb venturi to mix with air and do it's thing in the engine when fired by spark plug. Some float bowls have a drain valve, others you need to remove the bowl and dump it. After the engine has run the fuel dry, usually less than an ounce of fuel left in the bowl. I usually don't bother doing that since the fuel passages within the carb will be dry so gum won't clog things up. Your choice.
 

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You can also drain the fuel through the carb drain bolt.
The oil is supposed to have extra zinc in it for break in.
For what it's worth I used my break in oil for a season before changing it.
Not much 'silver' at all.. but then again it's a different mfg in which that engine manufacturer engines usually have a pretty decent looking first drain.
Yours might be fine.. but for peace of mind you can change it with a couple hours on it..the zinc has done it job by then.. either way should be fine.


Sent from my LM-Q710.FG using Tapatalk
 

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