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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an Ariens 924050 s/n 006302. Engine is HM80-155128E s/n 9017 D

Tecumseh Owner's Manual and Operating Instructions is 181-151-1 dated 11-1-78.

Number on carburetor is 5002E7K.

2015 I fired it up and was clearing some snow. Same as numerous times before.

Then I noticed gas spraying out of the crankcase breather tube. Engine was running fine. By the time I noticed 3/4 of the gas in the tank was gone.

I didn't use it the rest of the season.

With a new season approaching decided to take another look while it is still warm outside.

I took the breather apart and soaked the part with the valve in cleaner.

With a little gas in the tank fired it up. It spewed gas again. Fired it up a second time a few days later. Did some short loops in the driveway with the auger engaged. Some drips from the tube or the surface under the tube was moist (but not dripping) from gas. Engine was running/idling fine. With no snow was not running under load. But I moved the linkage to increase the RPMs for a short time. Did not see any gas increase from the breather tube versus idle. I have not tried with a full tank of gas.

I only have used non-oxy gas.

In all my searches the only problem I found with the breather was oil leaking out.

Carburetor was replaced about 8 years ago after two rebuilds did not fix a drip from the air intake. So it is not original.

Any suggestions on what to look for before I attempt cleaning and a rebuild? The Tecumseh manuals only mention oil from the breather.

I am afraid it will leak once it gets cold again. But the snowblower is stored in a heated garage (40°).
 

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before you do anything else, check your oil...check the level, viscosity and smell the dipstick.

My guess is that fuel is filling your crankcase due to a carb needle not closing (often a stuck and/or flooded float or a worn needle/seat).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
before you do anything else, check your oil...check the level, viscosity and smell the dipstick.

My guess is that fuel is filling your crankcase due to a carb needle not closing (often a stuck and/or flooded float or a worn needle/seat).
I smelled gas in the oil, so I drained it.

A stuck float might be it, the carburetor hasn't had enough uses since it was installed for the needle/seat to be worn already. (But I am not a small engine person)

I will see if I can check the float without taking everything apart. Otherwise I might start simply by running some Sea Foam through the carburetor to clean things.
 

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A Repop Adjustable Carb will solve the problem Quick and Easy for short Money. Plenty on the Evil Site.
 
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Yeah, sadly enough the new carbs are almost cheaper than the rebuild kits. then you know you have a good one. If you don't mind tackling the old one pull it off, soak in carb cleaner and be sure to clean every little orifice with a fine wire. Youtube has plenty of good how to vids on it....... replace the needle and seat and the rubbber components and give it go. I would install a fuel shut off vavle and be sure you use it in either case...... $5 well spent. Put a sticker on it to remind yourself to shut it off....... I do that on all mine. It becomes a habit after awhile
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, sadly enough the new carbs are almost cheaper than the rebuild kits. then you know you have a good one. If you don't mind tackling the old one pull it off, soak in carb cleaner and be sure to clean every little orifice with a fine wire. Youtube has plenty of good how to vids on it....... replace the needle and seat and the rubbber components and give it go. I would install a fuel shut off vavle and be sure you use it in either case...... $5 well spent. Put a sticker on it to remind yourself to shut it off....... I do that on all mine. It becomes a habit after awhile
I had a rebuild kit on hand, so I gave the carb a dunk. Pulling the smaller welch plug and running a wire through the holes (no clogs). I just replaced the needle valve seat. Everything else looked OK.

After putting things back together, fired it up. Did a few loops to the end of the driveway and back with the auger engaged, about a hundred feet one way. Ran fine, nothing coming out of the breather. So far so good. But I will have to wait until it gets cold to be sure. When the engine is under a heavier load.

When I "inherited" the snowblower from my Dad (they moved into a condo), one of the first things I did was replace the fuel line and shutoff valve. The valve was a screw type and wouldn't budge. The replacement is a 90 degree ball type. Usual modus operandi when I am done is turn off the gas and let the snowblower stall instead of shutting if off.

I am not familiar with this Evil Site for carburetors. The Oracle of Google did not enlighten me.

(One thing that is confusing for me. With all the gas flooding the cylinder, spraying out of the breather and getting into the oil, why wasn't it running like it was flooded or something? The only way I noticed something was wrong was the gas coming out of the breather.)
 

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Evil Site= Ebay
 

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I have been repairing small engines for about 20 years. I have found that you are better off giving a rebuild to your original carb first. They need to be cleaned well. I use an ultra sonic cleaner. Using this cleaner I can repair probably repair about 95% of those I try to fix. If you don't have the knowledge to rebuild, certainly the China knock offs are an option but I have found that about 30%-40% of them just won't work right. So if you are getting the $12.00 carb order 2 of them for piece of mind and convenience. Furthermore you may notice that the fuel bowl is chrome rather then aluminum. It gives the appearance of quality but that is not the case. Inside they rust real quick and easy, put your original aluminum bowl on it. One thing to remember if you are rebuilding the China carb, the needle and seat will not interchange with the original Tecumseh. Mostly the China carbs are probably worth the risk rather then spending the $60-$80.00 on an original but they certainly do have issues.
 

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Back to your questions. Fuel contamination with that particular engine while the engine is not running is not common simply because with the shape of the intake manifold the fuel cannot drain "uphill". A bad needle and seat will manifest itself by leaking gas all over your floor. How do you store the machine long term? Do you lift it up and store it vertically? If not chances are you are getting the oil contamination through the intake valve guide while the engine is running. Several solutions: #1 used engines are easy to come by and fairly cheap. #2 Do a valve job, install valve guides. #3 Do nothing but replace the oil whenever you see signs of contamination. It will throw a rod eventually, but it will probably run for years before that happens. If it was mine I would probably go with #1 but I have 7 or 8 of these motors laying around anyway. When I run into a motor with fuel contaminated oil I like to change the oil twice. Get it hot change the oil, get it hot again and change the oil. Oil is always cheaper then motors. You could do that and then run it for an hour or so. If the contamination re-occurs you will know I am correct.
 

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Over the past years, I probably have used the after market 13-18.00 carbs on maybe a dozen or so repairs. (Although I did rebuild my rider carb)

I have never had an issue with any, and they always brought the unit back to running smooth operation.

There are a thousand different styles out there, and when you replace them you have to do your homework for the right one, and even match up the picture prior to purchase.

Most people are not going to have an ultrasonic cleaner, let alone the where-with-all to rebuild a carb.

BTW ... note this is a 5 year old thread.
 

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Over the past years, I probably have used the after market 13-18.00 carbs on maybe a dozen or so repairs. (Although I did rebuild my rider carb)

I have never had an issue with any, and they always brought the unit back to running smooth operation.

There are a thousand different styles out there, and when you replace them you have to do your homework for the right one, and even match up the picture prior to purchase.

Most people are not going to have an ultrasonic cleaner, let alone the where-with-all to rebuild a carb.

BTW ... note this is a 5 year old thread.
Didn't notice the age, it just appeared in my e-mail as new. All good points. I am sure I have bought at least 100 -150 or so. The high defective rate is worst with Tecunseh carbs, then two stroke trimmer carbs. Have had little trouble with the larger carbs used on riders.
 

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I've never used an ultrasonic, and also never found a carb I could not clean. rebuild . . . Tec, Honda, Echo, Holley 2bb (auto), and Rochester Quadrajets (auto). YMMV . . . . Never had a Briggs, though . . .
 
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