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I have read that many people use a water displacement lubricant such as WD-40 to prevent the freezing. They did suggest spraying enough product in the cable housing to flush the water out if you already have the freezing problem. That seems to be you.:p
WD-40 is a water displacement product, hence the WD in the name, 40th formulation.
I personally don't care for it as a lubricant, but I think I recently read that they had made some changes to the formula to improve the lubrication.
 

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Here's my suggestion; Prestone de-icer. It is bragged to last for quite a while. Some people spray thier vehicle windshields with it in the evening and supposedly it keeps ice from freezing on the windshield till morning:). I did't try that yet, but it works good in keeping ice from freezing to snowplows and shovels, so I suppose it's worth a try on your chute cables.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Went ahead and ordered new cables, and am going to use Tri-Flow Superior Lubricant - Will saturate the cables as much as possible, and
hang them in the house for 3 or 4 days before installing them - Local bike
shop uses Tri-Flow a lot for cables, chains etc. on bicycles - hope this will
work well....

Snow blower shop says the moisture occurs from cables heating up and cooling down, and moisture condensing in the cables - hopefully I can displace the moisture with the lube...
 

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Let us know how that works on your cables. Could be helpful for a lot of us.
 

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Tri flow good stuff on the expensive side though but lasts just about forever. I got a little throttle cable freezing myself mostly when i like to cut the banks and throw to that side. Usually move the throttle after each pass keeps it free. Its a hassle might have to move it a bit more often to keep it free
 
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