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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this snow thrower last year. I'm getting it ready for action this year and I just can't get the thing to turn over. It's indicating a trouble code of 27. I've got fresh fuel in the tank, a new fuel filter and the pump voltage looks ok at the connector (7.1V). When I try to start the engine, I hear a clicking sound coming from the area of the fuel tank. Does anyone have experience troubleshooting this problem? Thanks.
 

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Fill fuel tank completely. Check hoses for kinks. Check fuel filter for blockage even though it is new Lastly it could be a faulty fuel pump which I suggest a trip to the dealer under warranty
 

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Your description sounds exactly like a bad fuel pump on an automobile or truck. Its time to call your dealer and have them pick it up before the white mold comes along and the little moat monsters come looking for EODM food.
 

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Snowblowers don't need to be complicated. You should have bought a none EFI engine snowblower. Well, that is not your question, so I'm sorry to say that. Good luck fixing it.
 

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It seems that code 27 is Low Fuel Pressure. If this has a fuel shutoff valve, that's been opened, right? Can you hear/feel the fuel pump running? Is the little battery fully charged?
 
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Bad pressure regulator, leaky fuel injector, weak fuel pump, plugged fuel filter, weak battery, bad electrical relay, bad wiring, ... It might even be the control module. I don't trust these small engines with EFI. You leave gasoline in there and it will destroy everything. They are cheaply built by infamous companies. It is unnecessary. Like what are you trying to achieve with EFI on snowblowers? More horsepower out of cc and lower emission?
 

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did you leave gas in it? if you store it with no fuel in it you most likely got a bad fuel pump. once you wash the oil off the parts in a fuel pump they usually have to stay wet or they lock up. i would maybe even recommend trying to run some 2 stroke gas through these machines before you put them away for the summer just to try and prevent this from happening.

also if it is under warranty likely best to just let the dealer deal with it. i doubt it is a cheap fix.
 
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the factory shop manual for that machine becomes long for trouble shooting code 27 low fuel pressure, with many test points to check for voltage and shorts . from the tbi to the pump and ecu
like the others have stated take it to the dealer .
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bad pressure regulator, leaky fuel injector, weak fuel pump, plugged fuel filter, weak battery, bad electrical relay, bad wiring, ... It might even be the control module. I don't trust these small engines with EFI. You leave gasoline in there and it will destroy everything. They are cheaply built by infamous companies. It is unnecessary. Like what are you trying to achieve with EFI on snowblowers? More horsepower out of cc and lower emission?
Thanks. The EFI is needlessly complicated and expensive to repair. Poor decision on my part. I'm also beyond disappointed that there appears to be a problem with the fuel pump after less than one year of use. The Ariens also fights you every step of the way and makes troubleshooting a pain. For example, I had to remove a cover around the fuel tank to get to the filter and pump. When I tried to put the cover back on, the bolts that secure it in place wouldn't thread because the tank had moved during their removal. It looks like they were forced on at the manufacturer. I had to loosen more bolts that hold the tank in place to realign the hole. I can only say this is poor quality control and poor design.
 

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Thanks. The EFI is needlessly complicated and expensive to repair. Poor decision on my part. I'm also beyond disappointed that there appears to be a problem with the fuel pump after less than one year of use. The Ariens also fights you every step of the way and makes troubleshooting a pain. For example, I had to remove a cover around the fuel tank to get to the filter and pump. When I tried to put the cover back on, the bolts that secure it in place wouldn't thread because the tank had moved during their removal. It looks like they were forced on at the manufacturer. I had to loosen more bolts that hold the tank in place to realign the hole. I can only say this is poor quality control and poor design.
If you fix things a lot like me, you know how unreliable things are, so if you can make things simple, make them simple.

The fuel pumps on cars are protected inside the gas tank. It also help cool down the pump. They say moisture inside the gas tank is bad for the fuel pump. Therefore, you need to fill it up and don't wait until it is near empty. Their fuel system is also designed to take ethanol gasoline. I don't think they considered all of those things and other things on snowblowers. Not to mention snowblowers are used and stored differently. EFI is new on residential snowblowers. If they stop making parts for them, you are doomed. Even on cars, many cars have crappy fuel pumps and fuel injectors. So, stay away from EFI on snowblowers. Ariens doesn't build them, they just put them on their snowblowers.

Yes, they use small bolts and thin metal on snowblowers. They strip very easy. Happens all the time.
 

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Still have yet to get in contact with Ariens. I'd rate their customer service as poor. I did notice when I turn the ignition key I hear a clicking sound coming from the are of the fuel tank. No fuel is in the fuel filter I recently installed. Any suggestions?
 

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Still have yet to get in contact with Ariens. I'd rate their customer service as poor. I did notice when I turn the ignition key I hear a clicking sound coming from the are of the fuel tank. No fuel is in the fuel filter I recently installed. Any suggestions?
Contact your dealer
 

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Still have yet to get in contact with Ariens. I'd rate their customer service as poor. I did notice when I turn the ignition key I hear a clicking sound coming from the are of the fuel tank. No fuel is in the fuel filter I recently installed. Any suggestions?
Ariens can be tricky to get ahold of. That's why go through the dealer you bought it from. They can diagnose, get waranty authorized and repaired much easier than you calling the factory.
 
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Still have yet to get in contact with Ariens. I'd rate their customer service as poor. I did notice when I turn the ignition key I hear a clicking sound coming from the are of the fuel tank. No fuel is in the fuel filter I recently installed. Any suggestions?
in another post you wrote that there was the needed 7.2 volts at the pump plug wires, if so, you have a bad INTANK electric fuel pump assembly . there is a filter attached to the pump inside the tank
why didn't you take it back to the dealer? you have a 3 year warranty
 

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( When I tried to put the cover back on, the bolts that secure it in place wouldn't thread because the tank had moved during their removal. It looks like they were forced on at the manufacturer. I had to loosen more bolts that hold the tank in place to realign the hole. I can only say this is poor quality control and poor design.)

i hope you have either taken the machine to a dealer or replaced the fuel pump at this point, yet i have to note your remark about having to loosen the bolts to line back the tank and covers,

PLEASE take note that many bolts used in assembly of many items today are self taping/ thread rolling, meaning they cut their own threads into a casting or item when assembled, the item they thread into is not tapped saving money on assembly, end result is many times when reassembling the threads no longer align, there by making it so one needs to be loosened to align another item, it's something very common for shop techs
also they have 1st time torque when they cut thier thread and a 2nd torque when being reused which is a lower value so to not strip the threads made the first round.
 

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1979 (or so) Toro 724 (38050) and 2018 Ariens Platinum 24
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I think that I saw that he said he added a filter . . . gotta wonder of that may have either put more load on the pump, or somehow is preventing it from priming (if drained for storage). Also, I don't recall any direction from Ariens to drain these, but lots of marketing on how, since the system is sealed, there is no need. In any case, if it was modified, might explain the reluctance to go to the dealer . . .

And I am still confused about why folks call these complicated when they have far less moving parts than a carbed engine! Pump, injector, throttle plate servo, that's it, as opposed to gove in the engine, gov linkages, choke linkages, throttle linkages, float, needle, throttle plate, choke plate, needles . . .
 

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I had a marine mechanic tell me to use marvel mystery oil in the fuel when storing the motor for the winter to keep the injectors from sticking and such. I wonder if that would apply here to keep the fuel pump and injectors from sticking. It definitely can't hurt.
 
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