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Discussion Starter #1
My SnowTek 28" snow blower (Ariens model 920403 SN 075000+) won't start. I summer-ized it in the spring, draining the fuel, etc. Upon inspection I noticed the primer line was cracked (the machine is only 1- 1/2 seasons old) so I replaced it. It started, ran for 1 second and stopped. I removed the carb and it looks very clean with no gumming. I resembled, pumped 4 times and again it ran for 1 sec. So next time I kept pumping it. That barely worked to keep it running. Long story short, I discovered if I put a long tube to replace the primer tube on the carburetor and kept a bit of air pressure on this, the engine starts and runs fine. As soon as I release the pressure, the engine dies. What could this be?

cheers
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum eclecicangler . You obviously know something about small engines if you tried pressurizing the carb bowl with air. Some of the small passages in the low speed jet section are clogged with dirt or varnish from unsatablized fuel. You blowing into the tube forced the fuel into the carb as opposed to the engine vacuum drawing it in. It would be best to thoroughly clean the carb and then add some Seafoam (engine cleaner) to the fuel tank . Just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey thanks Grunt. I realize I misspelled my username! It should have been EclecticAngler! Oh well.

Ok, that's what I thought. So, I removed the carb, removed the jet. Cleaned surface dirt and its's been in my ultrasonic cleaner at 60°C for 2 hours with 3 water changes. It looks like new now. I'll try to find some Seafoam.

Cheers,
Michael
 

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Usually in a case like this, I'll shoot carb cleaner down through the primer port. This should in effect fill up the float bowl past the float close level and force gas out of the primer squirt hole. Might get a couple tablespoons full of gas out, just FYI. Usually that will effectively clean the circuit out.
 

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Just for giggles, also check the gas flow out of the hose coming from the tank. I just had some weird running stuff with a friends machine and he I found that the fuel line had delaminated and collapsed on itself. From looking or squeezing the line you could never tell it. More than likely this coming from the rotten ethanol
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys. cdestuck, I did check that and fuel is flowing freely. Thanks for the idea though, it's always the simple thing you overlook!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I still have a problem.

After disassembling the carb I ultrasonic cleaned it for 3 hrs at 60°C. I then blew out the passages and warm dried it at 50°C overnight. I noticed a thin layer of enamel on the float had dried (I did not ultrasound this part) and flaked off. I cleaned with mineral spirits, dried and then reassembled. I didn't have new gaskets but the carb is only 1-1/2 seasons old and the original bowl gasket looked fine. I also made sure the jet was clean and the emulsion tube was clean.

It started right up (electric start) and then immediately died. Long story short, I am experiencing the same symptoms, I need to keep pressure on the the prime tube to keep it running. So I am trying SteelyTim's suggestion now, I squirted carb cleaner into the primer port tube. I tried it once and immediately tested, same start-stop result. I am going to let the cleaner work for 15 minutes while I warm up and write this and try it again.

I did verify that gas is flowing from the tank freely and I checked the fuel filter at the top of the tank, it was like new clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After 15 minutes I was able to start and keep it running without pressurizing the priming tube. As it warmed up I closed the choke down and it kept running - sounded pretty stable. After about 3 minutes I reached down to remove the extension tube from the primer port and just as soon as I pulled on that tube the engine died. I was able to restart again - with difficulty - and able to move the machine under it's own power to test. That was fine, again, attempting to remove the extension tube I placed on the primer port caused it to stall again. Now I can't get it started at all. Removed the plug, it was wet so I dried it. I hope my starter motor isn't blown. In my frustration I let it get overheated. Now it isn't working. I'm hoping there is a thermal cutoff in it and it will be ok when it cools down. Looks like I get to shovel a 100' long double wide driveway with 8" of heavy snow on it by hand so we can head to Thanksgiving Dinner!
 

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Your engine appears to be a Stormforce made my LCT. Some of these engines have a low oil cut-off switch on them and will kill the ignition if the oil level is to low. If your engine does have the sensor, I would unplug it to eliminate it as the problem. If it does not have the sensor, I would put a spark checker in line and see if you are losing spark as the engine dies. It also wouldn't hurt to try a NEW spark plug. My snow blower had a faulty ignition switch that would kill the engine from the vibration.This is the LCT engine manual I found in case you do not have it.

http://lctusa.com/resources/PGH45163_Online_Service_Man_revD_101413.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It is indeed a LCT Stormforce engine. 208cc I have the model # and serial and it is listed in the manual you linked to (thanks!)

I don't where to look to find the low oil cut-off if it has it. I also can't find the air filter on this motor.
 

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It is indeed a LCT Stormforce engine. 208cc I have the model # and serial and it is listed in the manual you linked to (thanks!)

I don't where to look to find the low oil cut-off if it has it. I also can't find the air filter on this motor.
Snowblower don't have air filters. The sensor would be on the side of the block somewhere, probably with 1 wire connected to it. So when the oil is low, it grounds out the ignition system. Make sure the oil is full. If its full, check for spark. if no spark, Disconnect the sensor wire and check again for spark. This will help verify whether the oil sensor is the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The starter motor is fine! Now I must have flooded the motor, gasoline is actually sputtering out the exhaust port. I removed the spark plug and it is wet. What is the best way to unfold an engine? Leave the plug out to "air dry"?

I have Thanksgiving dinner plans to leave for now so I won't be able to work until I get back. I did check the oil and it is full. I'll check for spark (after I get the sputtered gas cleaned up!) later when I get back. Meanwhile, any recommendations for defrauding the engine?
 

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Leave the spark plug out, the choke open and the throttle turned off, then use the electric start for short intervals to evacuate the excess gas in the cylinder. I would also try a new spark plug if available. Good luck and have a Happy Thanksgiving.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Grunt and all. I'll do as you recommend and head out to dinner. I might have a spare plug around. If not, I'll pick one up in the morning. Happy Thanksgiving!
 

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