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Hello everyone and thanks for taking a look at this post.
I just bought an Ariens ST724 from someone on Facebook and it was not working (no start). Playing around with it, I noticed that it had the same engine brand (Tecumseh) as my old Yard machine, even though my Yard Machine was a 5hp as opposed of 6hp on my recently acquired Ariens. Well, this experiment worked out and the Ariens started working, so I figured: I'll just rebuild or buy a new carburator and I'm set. I decided to buy a new carburator after seen so many good reviews and it was so inexpensive that I wanted to try but, after receiving and installing it, nothing changed and I'm still not able to start my machine. So the question is: what am I missing? Why I'm able to start and have he snowblower working when I swap a carburator from my old machine, but when I install the brand new one it doesn't? I appreciate if anyone has any idea on what's is going on. Thanks
 

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Make sure there's gas in the bowl by loosening the bolt on the bottom of the fuel bowl. Next, spray ether in the carb see if it starts.
 

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. Agreed w/ Jlawrence about the fuel. Remove the Fuel line at the carb and Blow Compressed air back into the Fuel line to the gas tank. You'll know when it is cleared. Old Fuel lines Rot from the inside. Might want to consider replacing them.
 

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Make sure there's gas in the bowl by loosening the bolt on the bottom of the fuel bowl. Next, spray ether in the carb see if it starts.
. Agreed w/ Jlawrence about the fuel. Remove the Fuel line at the carb and Blow Compressed air back into the Fuel line to the gas tank. You'll know when it is cleared. Old Fuel lines Rot from the inside. Might want to consider replacing them.
I'll try these and get back to you!
 

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. Agreed w/ Jlawrence about the fuel. Remove the Fuel line at the carb and Blow Compressed air back into the Fuel line to the gas tank. You'll know when it is cleared. Old Fuel lines Rot from the inside. Might want to consider replacing them.
There's two situations here. First to make sure there is fuel in the fuel bowl, and second, to make sure there is both a continuous stream of gas and a strong stream to run the engine. Many times there is enough gas to start the engine but not to run the engine. This is why Jack Mel's wanted you to blow air in the fuel line. Blowing in the fuel line may not be enough. If you don't have an air compressor, you can run a clothes hanger in the house but check to see you don't have a fuel screen inside the tank.
 

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I have messed around with enough small engines that I when there is any kind of a carb issue that is going to require a disassembly or replacement I REMOVE the fuel tank and clean it out ! This is typically a good time to replace the shutoff valve if it has one (or install one if it does not) and all of the fuel line BEFORE re-installing the carb.

Remember, on most small engines that use 1/4" ID neoprene fuel line, this is NOT the same fuel line sold at auto parts stores ! Small engine vacuum/gravity feed fuel lines are 1/2" OD, while automotive pressure fuel lines are 9/16"-5/8" OD. It may not seem like much of a difference but your old hose clamps probably will NOT fit and you may have routing issues.
 

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If the engine runs with one carb but not another, assuming they're hooked up correctly you'd have to assume it's either something defective or improperly adjusted in one vs another.
I noted you said this blower had a 6 hp motor on it but not much else. I'm going to assume it has a float carb with both idle and high speed jets being adjustable.
Tecumseh gives a starting point of idle jet open 1 turn and main jet open 1 1/2 turns. Start the engine and at idle then at high speed turn the adjustment on the jet till it gets to it's highest rpm. Then turn it in and out till it starts to fall off and split the difference for the setting, do it in turn on each.
You might have to adjust the float though most replacement carbs I've purchased have been correctly adjusted when received.
The other thing for me, if I'm replacing a carb (especially if it has a non adjustable main jet) I will get a replacement with the correct throttle and choke on it to match the original so both are adjustable. One other thing, I've had TEC motors on Ariens blowers that didn't have a primer nipple on them so when I get a replacement carb I get one with the primer fitting on it, they start a whole lot easier IMO.

If you have the Tecumseh pdf, the adjustment procedure is on page 15 & 16.

Hope that helps.

PS I thought the ST724's came with a 7 HP motor. Are you sure it's a 6 hp on your machine? It could have been replaced in the past or incorrectly identified. There should be a model number stamped on the top of the flywheel cover, it would be worth checking to confirm what you have.
 
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