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The blower has run like a champ until today. The 2nd stage blower is spinning fine but the auger now slips. The auger turns sporadically and not with a strong bite anymore. It doesn't take much snow to stop it completely. I am hoping that this is just a shear pin or dowel pin problem, quick and easy to repair. All the shear pins on the auger shaft are good but the whole shaft is no longer powerful under load. More snow coming tomorrow.

I looked up the schematic diagram and see that there is a dowel pin, (part 43) and I wonder if this could have sheared and if that would account for the symptoms I have described?
https://www.partstree.com/parts/troy-bilt/snow-blowers-snow-throwers/5024-31ah63n2711-troy-bilt-storm-24-snow-thrower-2007/auger-auger-housing/

It says the pin is compatible with this
Troy-Bilt 5024 (31AH63N2711) - Troy-Bilt Storm 24" Snow Thrower (2007)
Those are the same numbers on my machine except that mine is 2005. is that a compatibility problem? Is the same dowel pin used in the 2005 model also used in the 2007 model?

Is there a protocol to inspect and replace this dowel pin to see if that resolves the issue before I dig into it deeper? I haven't ever taken one of these apart before. Can someone please walk me thru it?
 

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First, Make sure the belt is tight. If the Impeller spins Fine, and the Rakes do not, the Bronze Auger gear is Most likely Toast, part #45.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I have split open the housing and can see that you are correct.
The worm gear is shot.
https://www.partstree.com/parts/troy-bilt/parts/917-04861/

What I don't see is an obvious way to remove the housing and rakes from the impeller shaft. It's obviously held in place and probably that dowel pin #43 is keeping it in place or so I suppose. I don't really know. I have also unscrewed the bolts on the two lateral sides of the rake shaft that hold it into the outer frame. It's all lose and the gear housing is split apart about 1/4" but that's as wide apart as it will go.

What are the steps to remove the housing and rake shaft?
 

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You need to pull the whole assembly out of the auger housing. This is done by first removing the large pulley. Then there are bolts on the side of the auger that hold the shaft in place. Once you take them, off, You can pull the whole assembly out. Then you need to take the shear pins out, and slide the rakes off. Mark the rakes so you know where they go when you reassemble. After the rakes are off, the gear case will split once you take out the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Man what a process. LOL Getting that pully screw out was interesting, not much working room. I don't look forward to trying to get it back in.

The auger and impeller are out, the case split, the broken gear removed. Everything in the housing cleaned up all shiny. All the parts laid out in order for reassembly. The new gear should be here by Thursday the 6th.

I wouldn't have gotten this far without all the help you have each given me. Thank you! I can see that I'm going to need some grease and some gasket sealer to put it back together. Any recommendations?
 

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I should have Mentioned to separate the auger assembly from the chassis. Makes things much easier.
 

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:welcome: to SBF Kelly Call

That's one ugly lookin' gear ya got there. :sad2:

.
 

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one would think MTD got wiser and hardened that dang gear by now! soft ver. hard metal ??
Planned obsolescence
Planned obsolescence, or built-in obsolescence, in industrial design and economics is a policy of planning or designing a product with an artificially limited useful life, so it will become obsolete after a certain period of time. The rationale behind the strategy is to generate long-term sales volume by reducing the time between repeat purchases.

Ariens 10000 series used Gearboxes with Hardened gears that Obviously Lasted "Too Long". They later went to the Bronze Gear that had a more Limited Lifespan.
 
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hear you jack! just like car companies 5 to 7 years old try and get parts,
i have a 2008 cadet lawn tractor the engine was DC'd in 2010 after the fake Hp class action law suite . kohler courage is now the KT and nothing fits, so i had to repower with a kt
 

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Planned obsolescence
Planned obsolescence, or built-in obsolescence, in industrial design and economics is a policy of planning or designing a product with an artificially limited useful life, so it will become obsolete after a certain period of time. The rationale behind the strategy is to generate long-term sales volume by reducing the time between repeat purchases.

Ariens 10000 series used Gearboxes with Hardened gears that Obviously Lasted "Too Long". They later went to the Bronze Gear that had a more Limited Lifespan.
Do you think that's true or was it an intentional secondary fail-safe? If you run into something with the front end, first your shear pins will break, if they don't break, the worm gear goes so it doesn't do more costly damage up through the shaft/impeller/engine or cause injury to the operator? Just throwing an idea out there. I don't have any experience with machines that have hardened or cast iron gears...
 

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Do you think that's true or was it an intentional secondary fail-safe? If you run into something with the front end, first your shear pins will break, if they don't break, the worm gear goes so it doesn't do more costly damage up through the shaft/impeller/engine or cause injury to the operator? Just throwing an idea out there. I don't have any experience with machines that have hardened or cast iron gears...
Have No Illusions. It's All About the Money.
 
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