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Discussion Starter #1
Assuming that I am using ethanolated fuel with a stabilizer would it be better to shut the fuel supply off at the supply valve and run it dry until it shuts off or kill the ignition and just leave some in the bowl?

I’m not talking about seasonal storage just in between uses during the season.
 

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You'll get different opinions. After every use I turn off the fuel and let it run until it dies from fuel starvation. Others leave fuel in the carburetor bowl and have had no ill effects. At end of season I even remove the carburetor bowl drain screw and drain out that last little bit.
 

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I turn off the fuel and let it run dry. Not sure if that's the absolute best thing to do but I figure if no gas is in the bowl there is less of a risk of water and gum building up in the carb.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You'll get different opinions. After every use I turn off the fuel and let it run until it dies from fuel starvation. Others leave fuel in the carburetor bowl and have had no ill effects. At end of season I even remove the carburetor bowl drain screw and drain out that last little bit.
Okay thanks. Hey since you do the same thing, have you ever had any leakage from around the carb when priming it before starting? I’ve never had it before but did the other day and wasn’t sure if it was definitely from a leak or if it just overflowed out of something from over-priming?
 

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I've never had it leak fuel from use of the primer but I've seen youtube videos in which that does seem to happen a lot. As long as it doesn't leak when using or when the engine is off I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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On my old MTD I have the same leakage when I prime. It's not unusual and nothing to worry about.
 

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I don't think the fuel shut-off valve is designed for frequent operation so I leave it open, relying on the carb float valve to shut off fuel flow to the bowl. The float bowl valve is designed for frequent operation. Never had any problems. Allowing the engine to run out of gas and buck and spit as it does so every use is not a great idea in my opinion.
 

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My thoughts from another recent thread:

IMO, there is absolutely no need to run the carb dry after every use.
Does it hurt? Probably not.
Does it help? Probably not.
Is it necessary? Definately not. ;)

It could actually be worse though, because you are getting *most* of the gas out of the carb, but not all, so the little bit left over could dry out leaving varnish deposits behind, which could then gunk up and clog the carb. But if you just leave the gas alone until the next use, days or weeks later, there is too much gas to dry out completely, which IMO is the far better scenerio.

Most people do drain the carb, but *once a year*, at the end of winter, to prep the machine for 7 or 8 months of summer storage. In that case, they also remove the carb bowl and dump the excess gas, and wipe down the carb, to be sure its fully dry. Recent thread on that topic here:

https://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/general-snowblower-discussion/146667-end-season-run-dry-treat.html

If you choose to run it dry after *every* use, its probably fine. But IMO there is no good reason to do it, and it could in theory be worse than not doing it.

Its always best to follow the manufacturer recommendations:

In the Honda 1332 Manual it states:

To shutoff track unit:

1_ Disengage Handlebar (Auger and Drive)

2_ Put it in neutral drive

3_ Put it from fast to slow

4_Shut off key from On to Off

5_ Turn fuel valve off
Which in this case is *not* running the carb dry after every use.

Scot

Copied and pasted from thIs thread ;)

https://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/honda-snowblowers/146935-shutting-off-storing-honda-snowblower.html
 

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I've done it both ways, with no noticeable difference. Currently, I've been running it dry after using, but that's partly because I have no idea when it will actually be needed again.

A middle ground would be to just close the fuel shutoff between uses. That helps avoid drips, or a crankcase full of gas (bad news), if the float valve starts leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don't think the fuel shut-off valve is designed for frequent operation so I leave it open, relying on the carb float valve to shut off fuel flow to the bowl. The float bowl valve is designed for frequent operation. Never had any problems. Allowing the engine to run out of gas and buck and spit as it does so every use is not a great idea in my opinion.


The bucking and spitting is exactly what conceded me a bit. I’m sure it’s fine but on a regular basis could it cause problems or cause unnecessary wear? Who knows


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks scotsman!

The little things like the fact that if you leave only a little in the carb then it’s more likely to varnish is exactly what I was looking for.

I’ll leave the bowl full till the season ends!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I do simply because I own too many snowblowers (wide smiley face), and while I try to use them all every time I have snow to throw, our winter storms can be infrequent enough to where sometimes, the latest time I use them is the last time that winter I use them.

I've had winters where they don't get used past New Years Day. Last winter (especially late January to mid April) - and so far this winter (especially the last 3 weeks) - lots of use compared to our average winters.

I never used to run them dry and I constantly fought carb issues - and that's with using 91 no ethanol pump gas. I started doing it last winter after rebuilds - no issues on those two machines (one sold) since. The other two machines just got rebuilt...doing it with them also.

As the saying goes, "your mileage may vary". But over time, I've become anal with all my gas powered small engine machines - and my "luck" with them has improved across the board. Go figure.
 
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You'll get different opinions. After every use I turn off the fuel and let it run until it dies from fuel starvation. Others leave fuel in the carburetor bowl and have had no ill effects. At end of season I even remove the carburetor bowl drain screw and drain out that last little bit.
Okay thanks. Hey since you do the same thing, have you ever had any leakage from around the carb when priming it before starting? I’ve never had it before but did the other day and wasn’t sure if it was definitely from a leak or if it just overflowed out of something from over-priming?
The primer pulls a vacuum on the gas line to fill the bowl. Once the bowl is full, excess gas will flow past the jet and come out of the carb’s air intake.

This is a normal process.

Generally three primes is recommended if you follow the manufacturer shut down procedure:
- disengage auger
- throttle from fast to slow
- turn off engine
- turn off fuel shut off
This leaves the bowl rather full with fuel.

If you run it dry or drain the bowl, then you will need to prime it until you see fuel from the carbs air intake dripping out, maybe 10 pumps or more.
 

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I'm not quite following. Are you saying the printer is needed to refill the empty bowl, after opening the shutoff?

I don't think that's true. Gravity should refill the bowl once the shutoff is opened.
 

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I'm not quite following. Are you saying the printer is needed to refill the empty bowl, after opening the shutoff?

I don't think that's true. Gravity should refill the bowl once the shutoff is opened.
Gravity will feed fuel to the bowl because the float needle is lowered when carb is empty.
I disengage the fuel shut off, then start priming when the bowl is empty. I don’t wait for the bowl to fill then prime. It’s a guess as to how long it will take, I just start priming until a drip of fuel exits the air intake.
That way I know it’s ready to start.
 

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Most people do drain the carb, but *once a year*, at the end of winter, to prep the machine for 7 or 8 months of summer storage.

That must so nice. At best we get two, maybe three months of lousy dog sledding. July is the only month I'm aware of that has no snow in the record books. :frown:


Re the Op's query, I do turn the fuel off and let the beast pop and fart until she's still. Did that with the old Mastercraft too. However, and as has been noted, the primer may need a workout to get things going again.
 

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The primer pulls a vacuum on the gas line to fill the bowl. Once the bowl is full, excess gas will flow past the jet and come out of the carb’s air intake.

I think you meant it pressurizes the fuel bowl (at least on a Tecumseh engine). The primer bulb is nothing more than a miniature bellows. Pushing the primer bulb increases the pressure in the fuel bowl which in turn causes some fuel to be forced into the throat of the carb. You'll notice the nipple on the carb where the primer bulb connects is nothing more than a open channel to the fuel bowl area of the carb.

On the question of shutting off the fuel line prior to shut down letting the engine die due to lack of fuel, I do that. One additional thing I've done, some of the older Tecumseh carbs have a drain button on the bowl. If the seal is still good, swapping out the bowl allows you to finish draining the carb bowl when not in use (assuming you've turned off the gas line). I like a dry carb when not in use, but that's a personal thing.
 

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I think you meant it pressurizes the fuel bowl (at least on a Tecumseh engine). The primer bulb is nothing more than a miniature bellows. Pushing the primer bulb increases the pressure in the fuel bowl which in turn causes some fuel to be forced into the throat of the carb. You'll notice the nipple on the carb where the primer bulb connects is nothing more than a open channel to the fuel bowl area of the carb.
No, I mean’t draw a vacuum.

https://www.jackssmallengines.com/diy/how-primer-bulbs-work/
 
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