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I use Seafoam in all of my occasional use engines too. It makes a huge difference in two stroke engines by keeping the cylinders from carboning up (rather than blowing them out once a year or so).

It may be less necessary in my four stroke engines but I still use it, and when you borescope their cylinders they are shiny bright.

YMMV.
 

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I use Seafoam in all of my occasional use engines too. It makes a huge difference in two stroke engines by keeping the cylinders from carboning up (rather than blowing them out once a year or so).

It may be less necessary in my four stroke engines but I still use it, and when you borescope their cylinders they are shiny bright.

YMMV.

And if you had the same exact engines used under the same exact conditions without the additive you would actually be able to tell if it matters or not.

In the 35 years I've been using engines I've never had a single issue with a cylinder except for one. The oil injector pump on a 2 stroke stopped working causing it to seize up and score the cylinder wall badly in 1987. Seafoam would not have helped the situation.
 

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Hard to know, that's true. I have decarboned engines using Seafoam and that works well. So there's some logic that smaller ongoing use would keep the carbon down.

I also use a diesel additive in my diesel engines, which purports to replace some of the lubricity lost when the sulphur was reduced a couple of decades ago. The injectors in particular rely solely on the fuel for their lubrication.

Bottom line for me is that, per tank, Seafoam is cheap insurance. Others have different opinions, some bordering on religious fervor, and we can all spend our money - or not - as we wish.
 
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