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I'm scheduled to have a look at it tomorrow morning.

This looks to be a later model and I think that means it does not have the gear reduction motor, is that right ?

Considering the condition, which looks pretty good, is the price fair ?

The seller wants $250.00 for it.

Everything lubed/adjusted, oil changed, carb cleaned and adjusted within the last couple weeks.

We don't see these around here very often.









 

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I do not have one, but that looks to be in excellent condition. Sure, it could use some paint on the areas that you would expect, but that's a simple fix and you have the time to get it taken care of. I'd say, give the cord a pull, make sure that it goes through the gears, and the auger engages, and if your happy with it and the price go for it.
 

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Well... nevermind then !
The seller emailed and says he just sold it.

'doh! oh well, that happens..
Bobcats are unusual, but I dont think they are any more deseriable or valuable than any other vintage snowblower..

IMO, $250 was a bit high for mid-summer..although not way out of line.
I would consider it that same as any other vintage 1960's or 70's Ariens or Toro..worth about $150 in the summer, and $200 to $250 when the flurries start flying.

Scot
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Pretty much what I thought Scot.

After dwelling on it last night, I should really finish getting my Honda HS621 and CCR2000 in perfect working order before adding another blower to the garage anyway.
 

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I should really finish getting my Honda HS621 and CCR2000 in perfect working order before adding another blower to the garage anyway.
That's what I always say to myself (I gotta focus on fixing the ones that I have) but somehow I eventually end up with one more..... :blush::blush::blush:
 

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Two seasons ago I fixed and sold about 10 blowers, had only a few left.
This past year, I fixed and sold only 2 and had way more than 10.....left.....!
:blush::blush::blush:
 

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I'm going to throw this on this post because it is interesting and pertains to BobCats.

Shown below are pictures of an apparent last generation Crary Bearcat (BobCat) as taken from a Craigslist posting from Connecticut in mid June. I had tried to post then but was unable due to the fact my computer kept freezing up.

What is interesting here is that this is last generation BobCat with a number of noticeable changes. See the new type control panel - a la last generation Gilson, the new longggg chute w/the MTD-like top, and the Snowhog tires. I have never seen this version of a BobCat before.
 

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'doh! oh well, that happens..
Bobcats are unusual, but I dont think they are any more deseriable or valuable than any other vintage snowblower..

Scot
In my opinion,they are LESS so than other vintage snowblowers.I've owned two Bobcats,had the use of a newer unit, and wouldn't take the gift of another.They are VERY over-complicated machines and parts,when they can be found,are very expensive.Their level of performance can easily be matched by many other vintage or modern blowers that are much easier and cheaper to maintain and far more reliable.

I will say that the newer models like the OP was looking into,are better engineered than the older models I had.I believe the newer ones used COMMON belts you can buy anywhere-mine used that rare,odd,skinny sucker that costs a king's fortune,and wears quickly.

The weak point of all Bobcats is the chain-driven auger.The driven sprocket on the auger is large and rather robust,but the drive sprocket is tiny(8 tooth?) and they wear incredibly fast if you don't lubricate them constantly.The original sprockets were very well hardened but supplies of the original sprocket/shaft assemblies have dried up.There are guys out there making them,but they aren't hardened well after the welding process and they wear quickly-lubed or not.

I purchased one from a fellow on the net and the sprocket was shot after just a few storms.The assembly is easy to make,but knowing how to properly re-harden the sprocket after welding is another story.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'll cross it off my list then, I'd rather have a reliable, effective, and easy to repair blower than a conversation piece.

In a way, after dwelling on it for a while, I was rather relieved he sold it.
 

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In my opinion,they are LESS so than other vintage snowblowers.I've owned two Bobcats,had the use of a newer unit, and wouldn't take the gift of another.They are VERY over-complicated machines and parts,when they can be found,are very expensive.Their level of performance can easily be matched by many other vintage or modern blowers that are much easier and cheaper to maintain and far more reliable.

I will say that the newer models like the OP was looking into,are better engineered than the older models I had.I believe the newer ones used COMMON belts you can buy anywhere-mine used that rare,odd,skinny sucker that costs a king's fortune,and wears quickly.

The weak point of all Bobcats is the chain-driven auger.The driven sprocket on the auger is large and rather robust,but the drive sprocket is tiny(8 tooth?) and they wear incredibly fast if you don't lubricate them constantly.The original sprockets were very well hardened but supplies of the original sprocket/shaft assemblies have dried up.There are guys out there making them,but they aren't hardened well after the welding process and they wear quickly-lubed or not.

I purchased one from a fellow on the net and the sprocket was shot after just a few storms.The assembly is easy to make,but knowing how to properly re-harden the sprocket after welding is another story.


What is recommended for lubricating the chain auger and sprocket on the BobCat?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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What is recommended for lubricating the chain auger and sprocket on the BobCat?
Whatever lube is put on the chain and sprockets,is not going to stay there.The chain cover is not sealed and snow very readily makes its way inside eventually packing the case full.This is the reason the chain and sprockets fail rather quickly if you don't check the lubrication often.

Oil of any kind is useless.I wound up using a good semi-synthetic grease that didn't harden in the cold.Figuring out a way to seal that chaincase where it runs along the side of the hopper would be the thing to do.I went one step further and just got rid of the Bobcat,as I've stated before,I wasn't too impressed with it.
 

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What is recommended for lubricating the chain auger and sprocket on the BobCat?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I've had a 5/20 BobCat for more than 20yrs. While Long Island doesn't get the snow fall that the northern U.S. does I've found that the BobCat is built like a tank as compared to the other brands available all of which appear to use variations of the same design. The most outstanding feature that I have noticed is that my machine is it will throw wet snow, and even slush without clogging. This is a quality that I haven't as yet found in any other machine. In all the time that I've had my machine the only part that NEEDED to be replaced is the belts. It still has the original auger drive sprocket. I lube the chain every year with motorcycle chain lube and oil all of the points as recommended in the OEM manual. A few years ago I decided to replace the old flat head Briggs with a new OHV Briggs. The swap worked out better than I had hoped for, the new motor has much more power, and operates and idles far better than the old one. If today I could a better performing machine for the area that I live I'd buy it...but so far I haven't seen it.
 

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My Dad bought a Bobcat in the fall of '62. I don't think it was any more than 5HP and maybe less than 24' width. It handled every winter in Watertown , NY till he retired and had a service do the snow removal. The times that I used it it had more than enough power to handle the 16" plus snowfalls. The only Bobcat that I have ever seen.
 
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