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That's governor droop which is normal.
The outermost hole will let the engine droop more before it opens the carb all the way although your no load high RPM is higher...the reason it increases your RPM as the hole isn't in perfect relation with the angle and due to reduced leverage on the spring it simulates a stiffer spring...the first hole for the linkage allows the least amount of droop..an engine is more apt to hunt in that hole..then we have the middle hole for stock..a balance of droop vs the possibility of hunting.
The percentage difference of droop across the holes can be a fair amount.
Governor droop is generally 10 to 15 percent.. with you in the outermost hole it may be a little more.. but let's go with 15 percent..when the engine is fully loaded just to the point of full governor..your engine speed would be 3213 RPM.
As we can see you weren't approaching that number so actually have plenty of power to spare.
I would give it a real good workout..lots of snow and see what the engine pulls down to... If your end of driveway was already deep and tough ... I would say that big engine is fine as it wasn't being pulled to full governor yet.
Remember you have a high speed Impeller which requires alot of power.. so given the same task you will use more power than a typical machine... It looks as if that engine is fine from what I am reading

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My experience is the reverse of yours. The governor responds more quickly to the need to open the throttle when there is more tension on the spring. The governor will maintain engine rpm at the set level as the load increases by opening the throttle to full throttle. If the load continues to increase then the engine will slow since it cannot develop the necessary power to continue at the gear speed selected.

For the op's engine speed to drop from 3,780 to 3,400 or so the engine is not powerful enough to maintain the throughput in the gear selected for 8" of light snow compared to more than 8" of heavy EOD snow. That is normal. So further experience with the machine will allow matching of gear selection to snow loading.
 

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I've got a Plat 24, and when new, ran it through old, hard 24" (deeper than bucket height) EOD that had also been wet. Didn't move fast, but could go through in 1st without bogging, and the biggest issue was not hitting houses because it threw far farther than I needed. Didn't screw with the stock speed - no point . . .
 

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My experience is the reverse of yours. The governor responds more quickly to the need to open the throttle when there is more tension on the spring. The governor will maintain engine rpm at the set level as the load increases by opening the throttle to full throttle. If the load continues to increase then the engine will slow since it cannot develop the necessary power to continue at the gear speed selected.

For the op's engine speed to drop from 3,780 to 3,400 or so the engine is not powerful enough to maintain the throughput in the gear selected for 8" of light snow compared to more than 8" of heavy EOD snow. That is normal. So further experience with the machine will allow matching of gear selection to snow loading.
The spring tension sets the speed the hole chooses the sensitivity.
Changing holes alters the leverage ratio to the spring.
Let's say a person had a soft spring but pulled it tight enough to pull the RPM up..the setup will be sensitive allowing for less RPM drop..but more apt to be hunting.
Let's go to the other extreme with a very very stiff spring for example...the spring is holding the butterfly open for 3600 RPM..when RPM falls it can't pull on the spring to increase the RPM..The RPM drops more before a correction is made.
Just imagine a piece of solid wire for example..it won't react..the engine RPM will fall dramatically.

Back to the hole for a minute... the further the hole from the pivot the less leverage on the spring..simulating a stiffer spring.

I think the OP RPMs reduced at the EOD but stated it wasn't dropping in the eight inch powder..I think the engine is fine. I cant look now as I am typing the post..but will check again after submitting this post

Edit:add
Found it.
The OP stated.


"Ok so i changed the governor hole to the last one before blowing that 8inches of snow that fell last night and today. It boosted the rpm to 3780. Now the 8inches didnt make the rpm drop at all but the snow is powdered snow and not heavy, the end of driveway snowplow pile however was alot heavier and made the rpm dropped to 3400/3500, is that normal?"

He is good. He had no drop at all in the eight inches ...and a little drop at EOD

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I've got a Plat 24, and when new, ran it through old, hard 24" (deeper than bucket height) EOD that had also been wet. Didn't move fast, but could go through in 1st without bogging, and the biggest issue was not hitting houses because it threw far farther than I needed. Didn't screw with the stock speed - no point . . .
Sounds like it will take about anything you throw at it...which is the point of choosing that model to begin with.
I still think the OP needs to point some snow in front of him and just keep going..the reworked snow will give it quite the workout..His engine is probably fine...the exhaust tone change of the engine is probably throwing him off as it is a large engine



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The spring tension sets the speed the hole chooses the sensitivity.
Changing holes alters the leverage ratio to the spring.
Let's say a person had a soft spring but pulled it tight enough to pull the RPM up..the setup will be sensitive allowing for less RPM drop..but more apt to be hunting.
Let's go to the other extreme with a very very stiff spring for example...the spring is holding the butterfly open for 3600 RPM..when RPM falls it can't pull on the spring to increase the RPM..The RPM drops more before a correction is made.
Just imagine a piece of solid wire for example..it won't react..the engine RPM will fall dramatically.

Back to the hole for a minute... the further the hole from the pivot the less leverage on the spring..simulating a stiffer spring.

I think the OP RPMs reduced at the EOD but stated it wasn't dropping in the eight inch powder..I think the engine is fine. I cant look now as I am typing the post..but will check again after submitting this post

Edit:add
Found it.
The OP stated.


"Ok so i changed the governor hole to the last one before blowing that 8inches of snow that fell last night and today. It boosted the rpm to 3780. Now the 8inches didnt make the rpm drop at all but the snow is powdered snow and not heavy, the end of driveway snowplow pile however was alot heavier and made the rpm dropped to 3400/3500, is that normal?"

He is good. He had no drop at all in the eight inches ...and a little drop at EOD

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Again, your experience is the reverse of mine. By moving the spring to the outermost hole the spring is given more tension and leverage so the carb throttle is held with more force to the fully open position. When the engine starts the governor flyweights spin outward and cause the governor arm to turn until the spring and flyweight forces match and that is the governed speed. In the OP's example, the spring in the middle hole exerted less force and resulted in lower rpm of 3,500 rpm. The OP moved the spring to the outermost hole which extended the spring and increased leverage on the governor arm that then applied more force to open the throttle. So with more spring force and leverage the governor needed more engine speed to match the increased spring tension/leverage, so new governed speed is 3,780 rpm. The governor is much more responsive to engine speed with the higher forces and acts faster. If you look at post#14 where I posted pics of the governor arm and spring positions you will see what I am talking about.
 

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I've got a Plat 24, and when new, ran it through old, hard 24" (deeper than bucket height) EOD that had also been wet. Didn't move fast, but could go through in 1st without bogging, and the biggest issue was not hitting houses because it threw far farther than I needed. Didn't screw with the stock speed - no point . . .
So I take it that your point is to match the ground speed (through gear selection) to the snow conditions, and the OP will be happy with his new machine. Sounds good to me.
 

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Again, your experience is the reverse of mine. By moving the spring to the outermost hole the spring is given more tension and leverage so the carb throttle is held with more force to the fully open position. When the engine starts the governor flyweights spin outward and cause the governor arm to turn until the spring and flyweight forces match and that is the governed speed. In the OP's example, the spring in the middle hole exerted less force and resulted in lower rpm of 3,500 rpm. The OP moved the spring to the outermost hole which extended the spring and increased leverage on the governor arm that then applied more force to open the throttle. So with more spring force and leverage the governor needed more engine speed to match the increased spring tension/leverage, so new governed speed is 3,780 rpm. The governor is much more responsive to engine speed with the higher forces and acts faster. If you look at post#14 where I posted pics of the governor arm and spring positions you will see what I am talking about.
The spring holds the throttle open the governor closes the throttle..Let's say the governor craps out..the engine will race as it only has the spring force.
The governor has more difficulty overcoming a stiffer spring.
The governor will exert x amount of force at say 2500 RPM and x amount at 3600 RPM...Too soft a spring that doesn't match those forces causes hunting.
Lets toss is a big spring just for the sake of it...just a random shelf spring.
We set to 3600 RPM no load...the butterfly is barely cracked open. The spring and governor have equal force giving us the 3600 RPM....Now lets load that engine..the governor loses force...the spring being so stiff isn't able to as well match the governor force..it lags behind..not letting the throttle open... as it had to be set more relaxed in the beginning.

(Photo is for a generator)
That is for a generator..the reason for so many holes is for almost precision droop adjustment . The speed alters the frequency..Our electronics are designed to operate at 60 cycles a second..so the generator needs to run at 3600 RPM...They want to keep no load and full load RPM at that 3600 mark..you can't so you shoot over a touch for the no load speed.
Changing holes changes the leverage ratio to the spring changing the droop..it also changes the RPM which you have to re adjust





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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Ok so after reading all your posts i have a bit more understanding of what is happening even though Town and Shovel have opposite opinions on the governor's reaction... Again i am not a newbie with a snowblower, im 40 years old and been blowing snow since i was 15 years old. I also live in Quebec Canada so we have very hard winters with lots and lots of snow.

With that being said, i had a 2017 deluxe 24 which i ran for 2 winters and was really impressed compared to my 20 year old MTD. I gave the deluxe 24 to my dad because his cub cadet was to heavy for him in his old age. Now being the gear head that i am i went with the plat 24 sho which i wanted for the power. Uppon using it for the 1st few times i did see a difference in power compared the deluxe 24 but not that substantially, i was expecting the plat 24 to blow the deluxe 24 out of the water which is not the case so i thought maybe something was wrong and maybe being that the engine wasn't broken in yet of something made a difference in power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Again, your experience is the reverse of mine. By moving the spring to the outermost hole the spring is given more tension and leverage so the carb throttle is held with more force to the fully open position. When the engine starts the governor flyweights spin outward and cause the governor arm to turn until the spring and flyweight forces match and that is the governed speed. In the OP's example, the spring in the middle hole exerted less force and resulted in lower rpm of 3,500 rpm. The OP moved the spring to the outermost hole which extended the spring and increased leverage on the governor arm that then applied more force to open the throttle. So with more spring force and leverage the governor needed more engine speed to match the increased spring tension/leverage, so new governed speed is 3,780 rpm. The governor is much more responsive to engine speed with the higher forces and acts faster. If you look at post#14 where I posted pics of the governor arm and spring positions you will see what I am talking about.
The spring holds the throttle open the governor closes the throttle..Let's say the governor craps out..the engine will race as it only has the spring force.
The governor has more difficulty overcoming a stiffer spring.
The governor will exert x amount of force at say 2500 RPM and x amount at 3600 RPM...Too soft a spring that doesn't match those forces causes hunting.
Lets toss is a big spring just for the sake of it...just a random shelf spring.
We set to 3600 RPM no load...the butterfly is barely cracked open. The spring and governor have equal force giving us the 3600 RPM....Now lets load that engine..the governor loses force...the spring being so stiff isn't able to as well match the governor force..it lags behind..not letting the throttle open.

(Photo is for a generator)
That is for a generator..the reason for so many holes is for almost precision droop adjustment . The speed alters the frequency..Our electronics are designed to operate at 60 cycles a second..so the generator needs to run at 3600 RPM...They want to keep no load and full load RPM at that 3600 mark..you can't so you shoot over a touch for the no load speed.
Changing holes changes the leverage ratio to the spring changing the droop..it also changes the RPM which you have to re adjust





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Thanks again for the explanations and help. I guess in just not that knowledgeable about the governor... I thought higher rpm meant more power which is good and the LCT engine can go up to 3850 rpm. Not sure i understood the "hunting" meaning and does that just means the engine will bog down easier because i moved the governor spring to the outmost pin hole?

Would you recommend i put back the spring to the middle pin hole??

Why is the default rpm set at 3500 or so if those engines are made to go at a higher rpm?
 

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Thanks again for the explanations and help. I guess in just not that knowledgeable about the governor... I thought higher rpm meant more power which is good and the LCT engine can go up to 3850 rpm. Not sure i understood the "hunting" meaning and does that just means the engine will bog down easier because i moved the governor spring to the outmost pin hole?

Would you recommend i put back the spring to the middle pin hole??

Why is the default rpm set at 3500 or so if those engines are made to go at a higher rpm?
Hunting is when the engine speeds up and down..(like just before you run out of fuel) or carb is a little plugged)
I can understand you wanting more power..my interest was in seeing if the power picked up in stock configuration... rather than possibly masking it by turning it up.
I run at 3450 RPM .
Yours was probably set to 3500 intentionally or they felt it was 'close enough'..not all engines are set to 3600 RPM..it's not unusual for them to be under 3600 as a speced RPM.
With that huge engine and fast Impeller speed it should really toss some snow and be kinda difficult to bog.
Just watch your tach for a while to see if it's really bogging or the exhaust tone is playing tricks on you...it's probably fine..but if something turns out to be wrong with be sure you put the spring back where it was before having the dealer look at it.




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Sounds like it will take about anything you throw at it...which is the point of choosing that model to begin with.
I still think the OP needs to point some snow in front of him and just keep going..the reworked snow will give it quite the workout..His engine is probably fine...the exhaust tone change of the engine is probably throwing him off as it is a large engine



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I agree! When mine digs in and powers up, the tone definitely deepens a lot, but RPM does not sag . . . . it just keeps going, and that was 1 hour old! :grin:
 

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I agree! When mine digs in and powers up, the tone definitely deepens a lot, but RPM does not sag . . . . it just keeps going, and that was 1 hour old! :grin:
Makes people look doesn't it...makes you want to keep er loaded up to please the lookers.



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Thanks again for the explanations and help. I guess in just not that knowledgeable about the governor... I thought higher rpm meant more power which is good and the LCT engine can go up to 3850 rpm. Not sure i understood the "hunting" meaning and does that just means the engine will bog down easier because i moved the governor spring to the outmost pin hole?

Would you recommend i put back the spring to the middle pin hole??

Why is the default rpm set at 3500 or so if those engines are made to go at a higher rpm?
The LCT engine is spec'd by Ariens to operate at 3,600 rpm, but LCT spec'd the same engine for 3,850rpm. It is generally presumed that the engine will last longer at the lower rpm. I think the reason your engine (and mine initially) ran at less than 3,600 rpm is due to the governor spring mounting at the fixed end which is the lip on the engine cooling shrouding is not a precision standard location. Production tolerances likely allow small differences in spring length and so the governed rpm. As noted earlier you can move the fixed spring location by moving the tab away from the governor as I did to increase rpm from 3,700 rpm in outer hole to 3,900 rpm with a slight nudge of that fixed tab. I liked the 3,700 rpm and even more the 3,900 rpm. It allowed my machine to throw snow farther, but more importantly with higher ground speed to increase throughput.

Since you do not seem to be happy with the performance of your machine at 3,500 rpm and no improvement at 3,780 rpm while in the appropriate gear then perhaps return the governor spring to its stock position. Then you can discuss the performance with your dealer since it should way outperform a deluxe 24 with 254 cc engine.

Your machine does not appear to be hunting which is the constant change in rpm going up and down. Hunting is the symptom of a problem usually with fuel mixture but can be a governor problem if there is slack in the mechanism. Since the problem causing hunting will reduce power it could well lead to bogging. You would notice your engine hunting right away, it is one of the most annoying problems.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Just to clarify a few things, i am satisfied with the performance of the plat 24 but i was just wondering if it was normal that the rpm went down under heavy load and what wasn't normal. I didnt have an rpm meter for the deluxe 24 so i couldn't compare results. I do see quite a big power difference between both but i thought going through EOD left by the snowplow with heavy snow that it would go through without drooping at all but thats on me, i guess you can overload any machine....

I also find that the speed gearing in the plat 24 is way faster than the deluxe 24 so i have to adjust on that when going through heavy snow.
 

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Just to clarify a few things, i am satisfied with the performance of the plat 24 but i was just wondering if it was normal that the rpm went down under heavy load and what wasn't normal. I didnt have an rpm meter for the deluxe 24 so i couldn't compare results. I do see quite a big power difference between both but i thought going through EOD left by the snowplow with heavy snow that it would go through without drooping at all but thats on me, i guess you can overload any machine....

I also find that the speed gearing in the plat 24 is way faster than the deluxe 24 so i have to adjust on that when going through heavy snow.
Glad to hear that you like your machine.

The gearing can be slowed down, by optimizing the shifter adjustment to favour the reverse stop. That would be the pin on right side of hex shaft. That is the way I set-up my machine.

Put your machine in the maintenance position (making sure gas does not leak from cap) and move the shifter through R2 and 6. Does the friction wheel assembly touch both stops? In my case it does not, so I adjusted the shifter rod to rest against the reverse stop (right side pin) which resulted in the friction wheel housing not reaching the left side stop pin. You still have all 6 gears and 2 reverse but forward speed is reduced in all gears and reverse 2 gears are faster.

If you just want a slower 1st gear then you can add a new 1st gear that is a little slower than your existing 1st (7 forward gears). The procedure is described in a thread on here. Basically you move the gear selector slightly into the Neutral wide band and fix there while checking the friction wheel position on the drive plate to ensure it is on the left side of center. You can check the speed is correct before committing to cutting the slot for the lever to rest in. This may be outside your comfort zone with a new machine under warranty. I have not done this since I like the 1st speed as a slow walking pace and not a "shuffle your feet" pace.

Good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
Ok so after putting quite a few hour on it, it seems it picked up on power quite a bit... Not sure why or how, maybe the break in process is done!? Anyhow i did switch to Shell Nitoplus gas that is ethanol free if that makes a difference. Lets just say i have some neighbors that looks at me like i turbo charged my blower!!!

Ps i left the governor spring at the 3rd governor hole, i was quite busy so i did want to put it back to factory for the break in process just didn't get a chance to do it but i think ill just let it be.
 

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Ok so after putting quite a few hour on it, it seems it picked up on power quite a bit... Not sure why or how, maybe the break in process is done!? Anyhow i did switch to Shell Nitoplus gas that us ethanol free if that make a difference. Lets just say i have some neighbors that looks at me like i turbo charge my blower!!!

Ps i left it at the 3rd governor hole, i was quite busy so i did want to put it back to factory for the break in process just didn't get a chance to do it but i think ill just let it be.
I figured it just needed a few hours use on it...It's good to hear good news.



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I would keep the engine rpm stock on the SHO, here is why:

The SHO is already a high performance snowblower (It has a large impeller spinning fast). Increase rpm will increase its output, but make your engine works a lot harder. Your engine only get weaker at a higher rpm, because of more load and less torque. Peak torque is like at 3200 rpm. Yes, it does more works at 3700 rpm, but it get tired quick, too. So, when you hit a heavy load, expect the engine rpm to drop sooner.

The governor was set to be balanced. Too much governor sensitivity will make the engine hunts. You don't want to mess with the governor unless there is something wrong with it.

It had mostly to do with the condition of the snow and how you used it. You might see gain or lost depend on your setup and those conditions.
 
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