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To increase the governed speed of your LCT engine there are two choices:

- move the governor spring from the 3rd hole to the 4th hole outermost hole) in the governor arm which will increase engine rpm by approx 200 rpm.

- move the fixed mount for the governor spring away from the governor arm by a very small amount to get a variable rpm increase.

The governor arm and spring are mounted under the gas tank, so the snow shielding around the tank needs to be removed for access. The governor arm and spring mounting are close to the PTO "front" side of the engine. Attached are some pics of my 414cc engine. The first pic shows the stock setup for my machine that was 3,450 rpm instead of 3,600 or 3,700 rpm. The second pic shows the spring moved to the outer hole on the governor arm which brought my rpm to my target 3,700 rpm.

LCT engines like to run fast so are spec'd to 3,850 +/- 50 rpm, so last year I adjusted the fixed end of spring to increase rpm to 3,900 rpm. I like that setting even better than 3,700 rpm. Produces lots of power to run a 6 bladed impeller and a 3.25" (SHO is 2.75" stock) engine pulley giving 1,447 impeller rpm and an impeller tip speed of 60 mph.

I do not worry about an engine breakin period and LCT do not give any info for that. First oil change was within the month. Back in the day we used to follow the manufacturers guidelines for new and modified engines, but that was a long time ago.

Good luck.

very useful info.

thank you Town.
 

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My buddy built a 302 engine in a Comet Gt right before High School Drags at Martin Dragway in Michigan. He "broke in" the motor by driving it to Detroit, and back to Kalamazoo, with open headers and made the High School Drag Races the next day. Breaking in a motor is subjective to the situation at the time and a number of factors. I have a Platinum 24" SHO. With a new machine I would do what the manual says concerning motor break-in [for warranty purposes]. Other than that do what these guys say as they have collective experience in these matters. I really like mine. Got to love the hand-warmers and I wanted a machine that could clear a bus stop next to a main plowed road that had heavy, wet, or hard-packed snow thrown onto the sidewalks. So far so good. It is a bit heavy to try and manhandle though. Haven't found anybody [yet] that makes a small enough thrower to manhandle, and that really throws the snow. I had a Toro, [or was it a Troy-built?] that had a 5 horse on it that just would not quit. After a few years of really hammering the packed, wet snow on the main road it finally gave out [the engine] but I beat it to death.
 
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