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Hello. . .I just purchased a new Ariens Deluxe 24 from a local dealer. He delivered the machine serviced and set-up, but said nothing about the correct or even any break-in procedure. Is there anything I should be aware of or need to do to properly break in this machine? Btw, I searched the forum for any previous threads relating to this topic but couldn't find anything. There also isn't any mention of a break-in period in the owner's manual, implying, I guess, that there's no need to? Just seems that any new machine should be run for a while without a load just to get things seated properly, etc. Maybe change the original oil. Any thoughts/help would be appreciated.
 

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The manual for my Tecumseh Snow King OH195SA says change the oil after the first two operating hours, I imagine others would be similar.

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I'd avoid running it too long without a load, as load helps seat the rings. Just don't load it up too hard for the first hour or so of use.

As far as oil, personally I tend to change after 2 hours, again around 5, again at 10 and then pick up a more normal schedule from there on a small engine with no filter. No reason to leave any break-in debris floating around in the engine longer than necessary.
 

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Run the Machine FULL BORE Under load for 5 HRS' with non syn motor oil. after the 5 are in the books change it out. with whatever kind of oil trips your trigger. :eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k:

I am assuming that you have a part-time business selling replacement engines ! Or, I am missing your sense of humor...as usual,
 

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I am assuming that you have a part-time business selling replacement engines ! Or, I am missing your sense of humor...as usual,
He puts it a little blunt but he’s not wrong, This debate has been going a long time, It’s the same with dirt bikes, some say easy running and others say run it hard as it seats the rings better and both sides have happy followers, I feel the engines can handle either BUT the important factor is changing the oil to get out any of the debris from breaking in, Dino oil is the best for this as since you are changing it so fast it’s cheapest, There will be tons who may not agree with me but everyone has there opinion.
 

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Babied engines are more likely to burn oil. But running it flat out too early can be rough on things as well. Basically, you want enough load to seat the rings, don't rev it to the moon for the first bit and let things settle in before giving it full load.

Of course, with a snowblower, there are practical limits to how perfect a break in you can try to give it, so don't go crazy over it.

As far as dino vs synth oil for break in, either will work. I've yet to see an engine fail to break in properly because it had synth oil in it. Of course, dino oil is cheaper for the first few short changes and you're unlikely to be running it hard enough to get the oil hot enough for synth to be of any real advantage at the beginning of its life.
 

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He puts it a little blunt but he’s not wrong, This debate has been going a long time, It’s the same with dirt bikes, some say easy running and others say run it hard as it seats the rings better and both sides have happy followers, I feel the engines can handle either BUT the important factor is changing the oil to get out any of the debris from breaking in, Dino oil is the best for this as since you are changing it so fast it’s cheapest, There will be tons who may not agree with me but everyone has there opinion.

What he said. :iagree:

.
 

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If your engine is the 254cc LCT, the break-in period is 20 hours or 1 month, whichever comes first. Following oil changes are 40 hours or annually, whichever comes first. Engine Service manual is here: http://www.redlionproducts.com/media/42140/lct-engine-owners-manual-pgh45163_online_service_man_revd_101413.pdf

Run the initial oil for the full break-in period called for in the maintenance schedule, unless you don't want your engine to be its best... If you replace the break-in oil too early, the process will not complete.

From a mechanic: "If you fail to follow this procedure [the full break-in period], the piston rings may never seat."

Great article on engine break-in: New Engine Break-in Procedure
 

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Most small engines don't come with any kind of special break in oil in them (and most big engines don't either, only a few do). So changing it early isn't going to hurt anything. Without a filter, I'd never dream of running 20 hours on break in oil.
 

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great thread.

I thought 5 hours was just about right. then 5 hours again after that. Doesn't it matter what kind of use the machine is getting after that? commercial machines need oil changes more frequently compared to residential users.

my memory says 20 hours but not sure. residential users maybe every fall because of water condensation regardless of hours.

correct me if I am way off base here.
 

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Commercial use I'd change at the hours spec-ed in the manual or a bit sooner (if you're really curious, send a sample for analysis to know when the oil is used up, but it won't pay for itself on something that holds so little oil). Residential use, I'd go specified hours or end of season, whichever happens first.
 

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Why do people always second-guess the engineers who designed it? :banghead:

Follow the recommendations in the engine manual.

Because sometimes they had multiple things in mind when they came up with the recommendation, not just "what will make it last longest?" In cars, for example, it's pretty common to see maintenance recommendations reduced / dumbed down so people think it needs less maintenance, will be cheaper to own, etc. And most people don't want to do any maintenance anyway, so...
 

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Because sometimes they had multiple things in mind when they came up with the recommendation, not just "what will make it last longest?" In cars, for example, it's pretty common to see maintenance recommendations reduced / dumbed down so people think it needs less maintenance, will be cheaper to own, etc. And most people don't want to do any maintenance anyway, so...
Yeah, sure, but we're talking simple small power equipment engines here. I find it hard to believe that any engineer would intentionally specify a defective break-in procedure to REDUCE the life of a product.

I've always followed the owners manual break-in recommendations on my small engines (18 and counting) and have yet to have one that has broken down or even needed ring replacement in less than 35 years, with one exception: a 20 year old generator that I loaned out to someone who ran it out of oil.
 

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It's not so much that the listed procedure is bad or anything, it's just that for someone who's willing to keep closer track of running hours, pay attention to how the equipment is used and change the oil an extra time or 2, it's possible to do better. They can only specify so much in the manual before people just start ignoring it or saying "that's too complicated"
 

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They can only specify so much in the manual before people just start ignoring it or saying "that's too complicated"
Guess I've never seen a break-in schedule that was much more complicated than "change the oil after this many running hours or this amount of elapsed time, whichever comes first".
 

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He puts it a little blunt but he’s not wrong, This debate has been going a long time, It’s the same with dirt bikes, some say easy running and others say run it hard as it seats the rings better and both sides have happy followers, I feel the engines can handle either BUT the important factor is changing the oil to get out any of the debris from breaking in, Dino oil is the best for this as since you are changing it so fast it’s cheapest, There will be tons who may not agree with me but everyone has there opinion.
The other reason for using dino oil (or at least a blend) during break-in is that synthetic isn't very good at keeping metals in suspension. That's why it's not widely used in aircraft engines that burn AVGAS, which contains a small amount of lead. Most aircraft gasoline engine oils are dino or semi-synthetic. (Most turbine engines, on the other hand, use full-synthetic.)

Unless the engine manufacturer specifies otherwise, I always use dino or a blend for the first few oil changes in new small gasoline engines. I figure that's when the most metal is likely to be in the oil, and the dino oil will do a better job of holding it in suspension.

Afterwards, it depends on the engine, but I usually use Mobil Delvac 1 5W-30. It's a synthetic diesel oil that also has an SN rating, and it suits most modern small gasoline engines just fine. But if the manufacturer specifies something else like a straight-30, then that's what it gets.

Richard
 
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