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Hi... I recently bought a simplicity sno away 32" for $75, the owner said he couldn't get the engine to turn over. It looked in decent shape and for $75 I could at least part it out and get my money back if I couldn't fix it. Anyway I removed the spark plug and the could see the piston was half way down, I spayed a bunch of pb blaster in there...I removed the starter and used a pry bar to work the flywheel back and forth. It finally came loose and I was able to move the piston up and down with the pull rope. I did a compression check on and had had nothing. Possibly stuck valve? I pulled the head off and valves are ok...the pushrods are fine as well. What I noticed is that the seat where the pushrod lay into they seem to move but with difficulty. The intake moves up and down but the exhaust I have to tap on the rocker with a hammer to make it go back down. Are these brass seats? I have never seen this happen before. Anyone have any ideas how to loosen these seats so they move easier? I bought new springs but that made no difference. I hope I explained the issue well. I can post pictures if needed.

Thanks
 

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The seats are not brass, the guides were. The seats are made of hardened steel. The valve stem is stuck in the guide. You will have to remove the valve and recondition or replace it and run a reamer through the guide since most of those guides are non replaceable, or you end up replacing the head assembly when they go bad.
Those engines were made from cheap poor quality recycled materials that we shipped to China to be re-used and made into new engines.
Chances are if the piston was seized up in the cylinder, the rings are no good and the cylinder is in questionable condition. Some times you can hone it if it isn't too bad, other times you replace the block. Usually in that case you replace the engine with a short block at least, for what the parts will cost to do a full rebuild, and the labor, it is cheaper to replace the engine as a whole new assembly.
If you are trying to do a quick fix to get it running, you have to tap the valve out of the guide and clean the stem, ream the guide with the special tool, then oil the valve stem and re-install it to see if it moves freely and doesn't have side play. In the case you described, if the engine would run again, you have to wonder for how long before something else goes bad in it.
 

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The issue was the tappet getting stuck...the head and valves were fine. It took me a while but I managed to get it to move freely now. I'll put it back together this week and get it ready for winter.
 

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It sounds like you are describing what is called a "Lifter". The Lifter just goes through the hole in the engine block.
There are usually no type of "Guide" that the Lifter goes through, just the hole in the engine block crankcase. That acts as its "Guide". There isn't a lot of excess heat or pressure at that point.
If the block is Aluminum, it should not get "stuck" normally. If it was a "Cast" Steel or Iron block, there is more of a chance of them "Sticking" but then again, that is also rare because they normally get a lot of "Splash" oiling on them where they are located.
On the old engines and blocks, they used to make "Repair Kits" for the holes if they got out of round. It was like a "Guide" that had to be machined into and installed in the block. They were found on the old "L" or "Flat-head" engines, normally on the bigger higher horsepower models.
They don't make those repair kits for the newer engines and the smaller horse powered ones, it is cheaper to replace the block or engine in that case.
But in any case, if you had a problem in that area, chances are, the block is going to have to be replaced in due time. There is probably some type of damage in the "Bores" for the "Lifters' or "Tappets".
 
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