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Just my observation from a winter spent playing with snowblowers....I'm very familiar and comfortable playing with the Tecumsehs....but they just idle faster then I'd like to hear a machine idle...someone on a recent post said they are made to be set 1500 -1800 RPM if I remember the post right. The few Briggs powered machines I've tuned are unbelievable how slow and steady they'll idle. I don't have a tach...but I swear they sound almost like a heartbeat. Has anyone else noticed this or am I hallucinating?
 

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I can usually get my Tecumsehs down pretty low if I want to; but on a blower, it really serves no purpose. While on the subject, while I think Briggs engines are a bit more durable (Not as many thrown rods) I will take Tecumsehs all day long, due to their carbs being about ten times easier to clean.
 

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i would be careful with to low of an idle on a splash lubed engine. jmo
 

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Briggs & Stratton built a better engine if you're comparing flatheads to flatheads. They're more refined and they're a lot more tolerant of being run with low oil.

You don't want the idle too low though, run them too slow and they'll overheat.
 

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Keep in mind that B&S made different grades of engines. They have commercial versions of aluminum engines that have steel sleeved cylinders and bearings vs the box store ones that were just aluminum. Not to mention the cast iron days...... Tecumseh on the other hand stuck to the same designs for many years. They both have their good points. I can't complain about the quality of one over the other. I see about as many failures come across the operating table in either of them. Briggs seems to have more trouble on the Vertical shaft mower engines - but Tec never got into those so it'a a moot point. Tec's 2 strokes are probably the better ones for light weight and dependability. I like both. If I can be picky I would prefer the steel sleeved B&S - but they are few and far between comparatively. I have a Cub push mower with one adn I plan to keep it forever. I know it will outlast me and probably the next generation too....
 

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ALL I am saying on this is those TEC engines always proved themselves to be GUTLESS Wonders up here in the frozen tundra.:eek:mg::emoticon-south-park
 

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ALL I am saying on this is those TEC engines always proved themselves to be GUTLESS Wonders up here in the frozen tundra.
Just curious what you're referring to, exactly. Low on power? Hard to start/unreliable?

Fortunately for me, I don't live on the tundra. But I don't really have complaints about the Tecumseh blower engines that I've used. Of course, all my blowers (three 4-strokes, two 2-strokes) have been Tec powered, so I may simply not know what I'm missing.
 

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my 824 has a Tecumseh motor and my 826 has a briggs motor . is it fair to compare them seeing that the briggs motor is probably 20 years older
 

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ALL I am saying on this is those TEC engines always proved themselves to be GUTLESS Wonders up here in the frozen tundra.:eek:mg::emoticon-south-park
Perhaps PS has had a bad experience with an individual Tecumseh or two, it happens.. but taking the entire population of Tecumseh snowblower engines, hundreds of thousands of them, perhaps even millions, made over half a century, 99.9% of them served very long and reliable careers, and many of them are still going strong.

I have two 1971 Ariens, with the original Tecumseh engines, 45 years old, running perfectly fine. The only trouble the 45 year old Tecumseh has given me in the 8 years I have been using it has been carb adjustment..(which I have now resolved, with the help of someone who knows how to do it!).. the engine itself runs just fine, plenty of power..I used it on 18" of dense heavy snow just yesterday, the machine and the engine performed flawlessly:



45 Western NY winters in a row, and counting..never rebuilt.
yeah, im a fan of Tecumseh engines.


Scot
 

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I agree Scot. Nothing wrong with old Tec's. They didn't change much - and for a reason I suspect. Briggs made numerous changes over the years - so it's really not apples to apples. Way more blowers were sold with Tec's on them than Briggs partly due to costs I suspect. Like anything, the more volume you make the cheaper your costs are. Personally I don't care what engine is on it - as long as it starts easy and runs reliably with good power. I noticed we didn't throw Honda or Yamaha into the mix..... again it's not apples to apples.
 

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Scot, it is millions of Tecumseh engines. The Ariens Museum thread has the third million snowblower displayed. Tecumseh also powered all Sears lawnmowers (Eager1) from the 1970s through at least the 1990s.
 

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Just curious what you're referring to, exactly. Low on power? Hard to start/unreliable?

Fortunately for me, I don't live on the tundra. But I don't really have complaints about the Tecumseh blower engines that I've used. Of course, all my blowers (three 4-strokes, two 2-strokes) have been Tec powered, so I may simply not know what I'm missing.
ALL of the ABOVE!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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From doing lots and lots of research and from talking to a bunch of folks I know, including a couple people that actually used to work for Tecumseh (they were originally pretty much local to me, even though I got late into the game, so some friends and their parents actually worked for the company), it seems as if the "issues" people had/have with Tecumseh engines (primarily L-head) falls into a couple of catagories/issues:

Hard Start:
- Can be attributed to points/condensor (went away when they went CDI)
- Can be attributed to stretched exhaust valves (primarily caused by lean run required for emissions overheating the exahusts, thus the valves would stretch over time, adjustable carb models it wasn't an issue, unless you had tons of hours on an engine and that should have been taken care of as part of the expected rebuild)
- Can be attributed to gummed up carb (primarily became a big issue because of ethanol requirements or owner neglect)
- Can be attributed to owner neglect (lack of standard maintenance, ie, new plug, cleaning air filter, etc)

Thrown Rods:
- Almost 100% caused by people running low on oil. The L-head of theirs is intolerant of low-oil conditions. As said it is a splash lubed system, thus without oil all **** breaks loose.
- Over-revving. The majority of the Tecumseh designs were done with a strict set of specifications that allowed for extensively long service life. They also expect a certain amount of service RPMs based upon output power. If you over-rev you usually are taking the engines out of their powerband and end up compromising the engineering put into them for longevity.

The Tecumseh engines were built to be dependable and to basically run forever if you take care of them. As evidences by how many are still in service that have been taken care of, it is obvious it was a great set of products.

In this day and age, sorry, but manufacturers want a product to last at most 5-6 years. After that they expect to make another sale. No longer is there an attitude of something lasting forever. That is counter to profits. If they could convince all manufacturers to make products that would last 2 years and breakdown, they would without hesitation. As long as everyone is stuck with the same set of shitty options, all the producers get to make profits hand over fist.

Sorry, but I highly doubt any newer engine will last as long as an old-school Tecumseh L-head or better yet, 2-stroke. Maintain it and treat it well and it will be a workhorse for a long, long time.
 

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Though I have one 10 hp B&S, virtually all the other units I've had have had the TEC engines on them. I've brought a couple back that looked to be ready for the scrap heap when I got them. You can't fault TEC for having a strong cast iron engine. If you don't throw a rod from overreving, they seem to last almost indefinitely.
 

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My avatar says it all for me!

Back in the day as a punk kid building mini-bikes and go carts, it became obvious the superior design of the tecs. The automotive type float bowl carb, a magneto ignition with timing adjustment. A gear driven governor (not wind powered) pressurized oil system for the vertical mower engines.

Dad's 1967 is proof to me they were built to last. Never had the head off never been apart other than for points and the coil took a dump a few years ago. Still fires up on one or two pulls.

It's sad they failed as a company, even sadder all the small engines are now made off shore. The loss of jobs... the loss of pride.. *** is going wrong with our country.
 

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Scot, it is millions of Tecumseh engines. The Ariens Museum thread has the third million snowblower displayed. Tecumseh also powered all Sears lawnmowers (Eager1) from the 1970s through at least the 1990s.
And beyond. Had an 01 Eager-1 with the Tecu. It liked to puke oil out the air filter every now and then but still ran awesome. But as was typical of 90s/2000 sears products, everything else on the mower fell off or apart. Donated it to my church scout troop for them to use in a garage sale for fund raising. They got $50.00 for it. not bad.
 

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my 10 HP tec idels down to 1200 range.. roghly though.. 1300 and it smoothens out.. only tim it sits that low is to move the cars back to finish up so not very long at all.. then back up to 3400 to finish the work... lack of power?? only time i might be able to claim such a thing is trying to give a 33in beast full mouthfulls in over 3rd speed really. and i mean full width and full heighth.. or over 14-15inches of wet snow itl bog down a little more than i care.. but itl still sit on the torque and chug thru soo..

my experience with BnS is very limited.. but i recall my dads old machine when i was a kid... it would chug thru about anything.. including the snowbank once it had time to freeze solid.. and soften up on a warm-ish day.. i remember a distinct sound throttled down too.. different than a tec at low idle... neither would work that slow obviously.. id love a chance to try one of my blower to give it a fair compare.. but not willing to actually dig one of those old briggs up and all that jazz...

well thats my piece on this... and if i may digress slightly.. the new engines being made today.. OHV and even OHC stuff coming out now.. well.. time are changing folks.. for myself.. seeing 12v start systems.. im hoping to see fuel injected small engines made :D they would possibly lose the under 3k rpm torque peaks we all love... so would the pulley sizes change to accomodate.. just like gearring changed in cars over time and engine related changes too.. heck.. might be easier to make a direct injected small engine... injector pump runs off the cam usually.. THAT would be cool!!

frozen tundra?? HA!!!! cmere with your powershift lol ill show you frozen tundra! :p lol 30min drive from me.. is a place where the wind always buffets THE main road going around the gaspe region so much so.. rotarry shovels on front end loaders are the only way to cut back the banks for the plows to get by... frozen tundra... puhlease! lol
 

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who been in it? looks like the heads been off judging by the the circles of rust caused by a socket scratching the shield
 
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