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Discussion Starter #1
Some of you folks might have read my post about my Brute snowblower which I restored… I've used it twice with good results except for one thing: The shifter seems out of adjustment, meaning that I still have reverse with the shifter positioned in "1" (forward 1st gear). I'm wondering if someone here know if I have to shorten or lenghten the shifter linkage (pictured below) so the actual movement of the snowblower corresponds with the position of the shifter? :icon_scratch:

Claude. :)
 

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It depends on which way the linkage moves when you put it into Forward, for instance.

You need the linkage to be more-Reverse, it sounds like. Since Forward 1 is still actually Reverse.

So watch the linkage when you move the gear-select lever to Reverse. Does that push the linkage that you showed down towards the ground? If so, then you need to adjust the rod to make it longer. If going into Reverse pulls the linkage up away from the ground, then you need to adjust the rod to make it shorter.

A different way to think about it: Look at the linkage that you showed, when you're actually in Reverse (ignore the fact that the gear-select lever shows Forward 1). You need to adjust the rod so that the bottom linkage stays in that position, when you move the gear-select lever to Reverse. Whether that means making the rod shorter or longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
It depends on which way the linkage moves when you put it into Forward, for instance.

You need the linkage to be more-Reverse, it sounds like. Since Forward 1 is still actually Reverse.

So watch the linkage when you move the gear-select lever to Reverse. Does that push the linkage that you showed down towards the ground? If so, then you need to adjust the rod to make it longer. If going into Reverse pulls the linkage up away from the ground, then you need to adjust the rod to make it shorter.

A different way to think about it: Look at the linkage that you showed, when you're actually in Reverse (ignore the fact that the gear-select lever shows Forward 1). You need to adjust the rod so that the bottom linkage stays in that position, when you move the gear-select lever to Reverse. Whether that means making the rod shorter or longer.
Thanks "RedOctobyr" for your reply. I went back to double-check and what actually happens is that when I put the shifter in the "1" position, the long adjustable threaded rod pushes the short horizontal lever down (and obviously pulls it up when I want to put it in "R"). So what I'm thinking is that I need to lenghten the threaded rod so it'll push the horizontal lever down even more... 'cause right now, it's not going down far enough which would likely explain why the snowblower still backs up when the shifter is in the "1" position…
Do you think I'm right? :confused:

Claude. :smiley-think001:

P.S: Other than that needed adjustment everything else works great! :eek:k:
 

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I really cant tell by the picture, but it looks like that adjustment threaded rod going into the adjuster is still corroded?
 

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That makes sense to me. I think your second explanation helped me :)

Forward is supposed to push the lever down. And Reverse pulls it up. When you set the gear-select lever to Forward 1, you're still actually going in Reverse. So you need the linkage to be more-Forward, not more-Reverse like I'd proposed previously.

If you lengthen that adjustable rod, that will push the linkage further down, more towards Forward. I'd expect that to make Forward 1 behave more like proper Forward.

As a sanity check, if your machine allows this: you know that "Forward 1" is actually Reverse, in terms of that short horizontal lever. If you disconnect the adjustable rod, then put the gear lever into Reverse, you can adjust the length of the rod until it lines up with the gear lever.

But I'm making assumptions as to how your adjuster works. On my machine, I can pull a cotter pin, and disconnect the top of the adjustable rod from my shift lever. Then adjust the length of the rod (and move the shift-lever position, if needed), until the hole in the rod properly lines up with the post on the shift lever, then put them together again.
 

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If you want to know what's really going on with the adjustment, put the machine in the service position and remove the belly pan. Then you can watch what happens when you shift. Or, just go with your best guess and make an adjustment, it will either get better or worse. I think removing the belly pan is the better choice.
 
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Or, just go with your best guess and make an adjustment, it will either get better or worse. I think removing the belly pan is the better choice.
Heh, and I would lean towards making your best guess, and trying that :) The actual adjustment should be fairly quick. But tipping it up may require some steps to make sure your carb/tank don't leak gas, and there's additional stuff to remove & reinstall. I mean no disrespect by this, just different personal preferences.

I'd say adjust it, then start it and see if the speeds are what you want, and adjust again as needed. I have mine biased to a slow Forward 1 speed, and a quicker Reverse 1 speed. This helps me chew slowly into snowbanks, and still back up quickly. I have 6 forward speeds, so losing a little speed from Forward 6 is not a problem, if it means I get a slower speed for creeping into deep snow.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Heh, and I would lean towards making your best guess, and trying that :) The actual adjustment should be fairly quick.
I'd say adjust it, then start it and see if the speeds are what you want, and adjust again as needed.
That's what I plan to do. I've already adjusted the rod longer and will wait 'till the next snowfall to see if it's adjusted ok (or at least, see if I'm going in the right direction).
and

I really cant tell by the picture, but it looks like that adjustment threaded rod going into the adjuster is still corroded?
Yeah it looks a little rusted in the picture but I assure you that it's very minor as I'm able to move the locking nut freely on it by hand. :)
and
If you want to know what's really going on with the adjustment, put the machine in the service position and remove the belly pan. Then you can watch what happens when you shift. Or, just go with your best guess and make an adjustment, it will either get better or worse. I think removing the belly pan is the better choice.
"toromike", I just restored it completely a short while ago and for me, there's no need to remove the belly pan because I clearly remember how it's made inside, plus I took a bunch of pics during the restoration which I can use for reference if needed, but thanks for the suggestion. :thumbsup:

Claude.
 

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I personally would remove the pan and do a physical adjustment while shifting, in order to see what is going on.
 

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If it’s going the wrong direction the wheel is on the wrong side of center, and why would you wait for snow to see if it’s going right, just start it and see if it’s going the right way at the right speed.
 
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
If it’s going the wrong direction the wheel is on the wrong side of center, and why would you wait for snow to see if it’s going right, just start it and see if it’s going the right way at the right speed.
You have a point there about the friction wheel going on the wrong side of the center of the friction pulley… (but I understand that it has to go to the other side of center to allow backing up). I'll remove the belly pan to see how far out from the center the friction wheel goes. This might be the explanation of the problem because when I move the shifter to let's say position "3" or "4", the snowblower does move forward, but slowly, not as fast as it should, so… I think that the problem is with the long threaded rod which is out of adjustment (too short) and not allowing the friction wheel to ride far enough out from the center of the friction pulley on one side (forward) and too far on the other side (reverse) resulting in too much reverse speed and not enough forward speed. Makes sense doesn't it? :confused:

thanks,

Claude.;)
 

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Actually had a craftsman doing the same when I got it, Turned out who ever put a new drive wheel in it put it in backward, which put the rubber wheel about 3/4 of an inch too far over and 1 and 2 went in reverse, Flipped it over and all went well from that point on So if it has to be put to the extream end of adjustment to get it in the right place it may be on the wrong way. Easy to put in wrong actually.
 
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Actually had a craftsman doing the same when I got it, Turned out who ever put a new drive wheel in it put it in backward, which put the rubber wheel about 3/4 of an inch too far over and 1 and 2 went in reverse, Flipped it over and all went well from that point on So if it has to be put to the extream end of adjustment to get it in the right place it may be on the wrong way. Easy to put in wrong actually.
When I took the snowblower apart to restore it, I didn't remove the friction wheel from the shaft because it was in good condition so it is in the same position as before I (see pictures below for a "before" on the left vs. "after" on the right comparison) … Thanks for the suggestion though. I still think it's only a question of adjusting the long threaded rod to allow the friction wheel to slide out more on one side of the hex shaft and less out on the other side...

Claude.
 

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Just put it in service position, pull the belly pan, set the dash shifter to neutral. The friction wheel should be dead center on the plate. If it's not remove the ball joint from the shifter yoke arm, put the friction wheel dead center on platter and hold down the drive handle with a clamp or rubber band. Loosen the jam nut on the shifter rod and move the ball joint up or down until it matches up to the yoke arm hole, attach ball joint, tighten jam nut, remove clamp on handle bar.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just put it in service position, pull the belly pan, set the dash shifter to neutral. The friction wheel should be dead center on the plate. If it's not remove the ball joint from the shifter yoke arm, put the friction wheel dead center on platter and hold down the drive handle with a clamp or rubber band. Loosen the jam nut on the shifter rod and move the ball joint up or down until it matches up to the yoke arm hole, attach ball joint, tighten jam nut, remove clamp on handle bar.
Thank you "oneboltshort"… That's what I'm going to do because all I've done now is "guesswork". I know the shifter rod needs to be adjusted by how much, I don't really know... but now that you explained the correct method I'll be able to do it right once and be done. :thumbsup:
Thanks again,

Claude.:smiley-greet025:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I finally got it right after a few tries. The rod had to be lenghtened a little and now the shifter's position corresponds with the machine's movement. :icon-clapping-smile

Claude.
 
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