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Discussion Starter #1
I snapped a shear pin while snowblowing yesterday. But I can't get the thing out. Part of the pin is still inside. The problem is that the holes don't align. So I can't even use a hammer and punch to get it out. How do I get the auger to slide from side to side? I grabbed it and tried it, but couldn't move it.

Oh ya it is an 2004 Ariens 8526

Thanks for any help.
 

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It should slide pretty freely back and forth. My guess is when it broke it left a little burr on it. Can you twist it back and forth at all and then slide it? Worst case would be fire up the engine and ram it into a snowbank and maybe that will loosen it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I had to use a lot of pressure to just turn the auger so I could even see where the out of line holes where. I had to use a towel and twist it as hard as I could. The shear pin is definately broken. I can't see the nut or the top of the screw. Just to make sure I wasn't going crazy I took out the shear pin on the other side. I can move that side of the auger much easier by hand. There is still some snow inside of the auger. So I was going to get a hair dryer and melt it and see if I can make it work.

But I could not slide it left and right at all.
 

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Shear bolts

I had one a while back where the previous owner had used undersized shear bolts (1/4" vs 5/16"). When they sheared it off, it bent the end of the bolt and left a stub that was next to impossible to line up to get out.
I ended up getting one side aligned with the hole in the auger rake and tapped at it with an undersized punch and hammer till it started coming out. The rake actually rotated a little as it worked out.

Only other basic option is to pull the augers out of the housing then pull the rake off so you can get at the broken off pin.

Doesn't sound like fun, good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Still no luck after I melted all of the snow. I was thinking I was going to have to take the augers out of the housing and take the rakes off. But I don't see how to do this in the manual anywhere. With my luck I will start taking it apart and not be able to get it back together. Do you know where I can find the instructions on how to do this. Otherwise I will have to call the local repair shop.

Thanks for you help.
 

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I finally got it fixed. I figured I would post in case anyone runs into the same problem. I had to have my father in law come up and hold the machine. At the same time I had to twist the auger and pull it to the left at the same time. Took quit a bit of elbow grease to get the holes line up, but it worked. Then I used a hammer and punch to get the broken shear pin out. What a pain.
 

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Whew, glad you got it fixed! Thanks for telling us what you had to do. That's why we're here, to help others with their problems, and your solution just might be what helps somebody else.
 

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Old thread, I know but I have to wonder if there was a poorly fitting replacement shear pin forced in before. I found one at lowes that was just a little too big in diameter which I tapped in thinking that it was the correct one and had a heck of a time getting it out again. The part numbers on these are very close sometimes.
 

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Six years, yup that would be old but I guess if your tapping it in it's likely not the right part or some supplier is just promoting it as being a substitute for something it shouldn't be. Or the hole was damaged previously by something too hard being in there and not the auger holes and the shaft hole don't line up just right ??

.
 

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This issue is more likely to happen when the correct shear pins are not used. Best to buy replacement shear pins from your dealer for your machine to make certain they shear as designed and can then be removed for replacement.

It also sounded as if the guy did not have many tools to attempt the repair job. The only tools mentioned were a hammer, punch, hair dryer, and elbow grease. Some repairs require a little mechanical aptitude.
 
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