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How many snowblowers have O-ring chains?
A few of the better made snowblowers have 'O'ring chains on them, others use gears on the shafts. Cheaper made ones use a plain Non 'O' ring chain.
I just did a service on an older Craftsman/Murray that had 2 original 'O'ring chains on it surprisingly.
It shocked me to see that they used the good 'O' ring type chains on it for that manufacturer.
 

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Oh, and if curious as to the lifespan of a street bike O-ring chain, the drive sprocket (the one on the engine output shaft) is good for around 10k miles. The O-ring chain and driven sprocket usually see two drive sprockets before total component refresh.
Most of my bikes go through at least 2 driven sprockets before they wear out a drive sprocket.
The big aluminum driven sprocket on the rear wheel normally wears out faster with the softer aluminum than the hardened steel of the transmission drive sprocket does, plus the driven sprocket gets a lot more dirt on it from being exposed than the smaller drive sprocket does.
I'll get around 10-20,000 miles on the driven sprockets and 30-60,000 miles on the drive sprockets on the street bikes, the dirt bikes about the same with replacements but different mileage, the race bikes you can't give mileages for but they use up 2 or 3 driven compared to 1 drive sprocket.
All of them are running 'O' ring chains.
That's the nice thing with drive shafts, no more chain and sprocket replacement. Final drive oil replacement every 40-50,000 miles and they are still running like new at over 100,000 miles on each one of them.
One Suzuki an '83 GS1100ESD had 60,000 on the driven sprocket with the #630 chain on it before it was replaced, it went through quite a few rear tires in between.
 

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The good old shaft drive ST1100...

Funny story. During the 2003 running of the Iron Butt Rally I was slowly motoring though Eagleville, California around 3:00am during a rancher sheep drive on my ST1100. Needless to say, it was bahhhhhhhhhd. ;-) The bike had just rolled over to 142k on the clock as I passed through town. I looked at the odo and thought, "This bike is going to see a quarter of a million miles easily..."

Three miles later I hit a deer at 65MPH totally destroying the front sub-frame of the bike and ripping open the radiator. My rally effort was over... Thankfully, my person sustained no ill effects from the collision. Although, I did get a bit of deer scat on the right leg of my Aerostich riding suit.

Here's a photo of the damaged bike:

http://zggtr.org/co/graphics/pc0308_tarman_k.jpg
 

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The good old shaft drive ST1100...

Funny story. During the 2003 running of the Iron Butt Rally I was slowly motoring though Eagleville, California around 3:00am during a rancher sheep drive on my ST1100. Needless to say, it was bahhhhhhhhhd. ;-) The bike had just rolled over to 142k on the clock as I passed through town. I looked at the odo and thought, "This bike is going to see a quarter of a million miles easily..."

Three miles later I hit a deer at 65MPH totally destroying the front sub-frame of the bike and ripping open the radiator. My rally effort was over... Thankfully, my person sustained no ill effects from the collision. Although, I did get a bit of deer scat on the right leg of my Aerostich riding suit.

Here's a photo of the damaged bike:

http://zggtr.org/co/graphics/pc0308_tarman_k.jpg
OUCH! That's no fun.
Fortunately you survived, the bike saw better days.
If you can find replacement parts would be something, then the cost of them, those body panels are not cheap, nor are any of the other parts especially the Cowl Stay.
'Cowl Stay' another name for the fairings 'Sub Frame'.
 

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MTD Dual Stage 31AE6B3H501 and Craftsman Dual Stage C950-52677-7
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I just use ATF in whatever version I have laying around.
 

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Your ATF will work but eventually it will drip off. ATF is usually a lighter base oil, sometimes like a 10 weight, so it will penetrate down into the pins and rollers better than regular oil will.
 

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I use regular spray chain lube on my Ariens Deluxe 28 SHO walk behind snow blower.

I also have a 42 inch snow thrower on my 1973 Sears SS-16 (Suburban) tractor. Sixteen HP Onan Twin cylinder engine driving a single stage snow thrower. Its manual specifies:
OIL LUBRICATION
Every twenty hours of operation use any Multi-Purpose engine oil.
D. Discharge Chute
E. Mounting Points
F. Auger Chain


So I use 10W-30. I've been doing that since I bought it new in 1980.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
As they say in my ancestral homeland, "Silly Buggers"... i.e. "There'll be a serious accident sooner or later if people don't stop playing silly buggers." All chains need lubing fairly frequently... A quality motorcycle chain lube is the dope.
I hope you didn't think that I was being arrogant with my answer, I never THOUGHT to lube the chain, and I was thanking for the info on chain lube.
 

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I use whatever Chain & Cable lube I have at the time ...

Currently I believe it is the NAPA Mac's Brand, or could be the Liquid Wrench ... I believe I currently have both on hand.

I use this stuff for not only chains and cables, but pivot points and some gears, as well as all kinds of other applications.
 

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what about using a silicone lube? i was fighting with my 1 door lock a couple week back spayed some of this in it and it worked so good afterwords that i thought i broke the lock. i have also seen this stuff in my neighbors van and he is a lock smith. i would guess it should also be good for chains or cables. i used it on my tool box and it has helped the drawers slide easier. best $4 i could have spent. next time it goes on sale i know i will be picking up a few more cans.
 

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You don't want to use a silicon, lithium, nothing on a chain but a tacky sticky chain specific lube otherwise it will fling off on to the friction plate thus the rubber friction disk. An exception is bicycle chains. There you want one drop of a specific bicycle chain lube or 1 drop of synthetic oil per roller. With a bicycle, you are not luring the outside of the chain but inside of the roller where the pin goes through.
 

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that doen't make sense tho. as far as i can tell the only way it would fling lube onto the fiction plate is if you used it immediately after applying it. the stuff is suppose to dry dry with no residue to fling.

  1. Quick drying
  2. No oily residue
  3. Resists high temperatures
  4. Does not attract dust
 

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I use the Chain and Cable lube specifically, as it works well, and I would imagine someone has done some testing on these products before they sell them as being specific to an application as specific as they are labeled for ... just sayin.

Hey, I imagine anything would work, as long as it is kept clean and applied regularly ... I have seen some still working with no lube, and I imagine the average operator does not remove the inspection pan to lube the chains.

Heck, there are probably many that dont even check the oil, or bother putting any additive in the gas.

If you want longevity out of a piece of equipment, you have to take the time to adjust and maintain it properly.
 

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I made my recommendation and why. You use what you want, I will use what I want, others will use what they want.
 

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I was at Harbor Freight yesterday and they had Liquid Wrench Chain lube on the shelf. I sprayed it on my arm and at first it foamed up before turning to a liquid. I wiped it between my fingers and it wasn't sticky at all. I expected STICK.
 
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