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Discussion Starter #1
So I have been noticing when I do a quick snowblow (under a half hour) my fingers are generally in pain from being so cold, but if I'm out there for 45 minutes to an hour my fingers warm up and the cold pain in my fingers is gone. Is this something I should worry about?
 

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Getting medical advice from a forum is probably about as good as getting it from a TV commercial. The possibility of multiple diagnosis from vascular constriction to Raynaud's disease to who knows what is too much to ask strangers to risk an opinion and to be satisfied by it. Make an appointment with your primary care doc and discuss it. You will both have better peace of mind and get an opinion you can trust.
 

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Getting medical advice from a forum is probably about as good as getting it from a TV commercial... Make an appointment with your primary care doc and discuss it. You will both have better peace of mind and get an opinion you can trust.
Yup.

But if you talk to your doctor to make sure there's nothing serious going on, and you want to do something like add heated grips, people here will be happy to help.
 

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Getting medical advice from a forum is probably about as good as getting it from a TV commercial. The possibility of multiple diagnosis from vascular constriction to Raynaud's disease to who knows what is too much to ask strangers to risk an opinion and to be satisfied by it. Make an appointment with your primary care doc and discuss it. You will both have better peace of mind and get an opinion you can trust.
My wife has Reynaud's, and her toe turn black with Dry "Gangerine" from being too cold. Doc put her on BP medicine for the Winter to improve circulation. She had so many test$, that I won't be buying the used HS928 that I had my heart set on. As they say, Unhealthy Wife, No Honda Snowblower, or something like that ! Bottom line, it is not something to ignore.
 

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So I have been noticing when I do a quick snowblow (under a half hour) my fingers are generally in pain from being so cold, but if I'm out there for 45 minutes to an hour my fingers warm up and the cold pain in my fingers is gone. Is this something I should worry about?
You'll need to judge if a medical evaluation is needed.

I do know that after I began drysuit diving, including winter/under ice I developed a whole new appreciation for exposure protection and it has boosted my snow blowing comfort.

Good gloves are most applicable to your situation. Mittens by nature will be the warmest solution. My favorite is fleece gloves with matching GORE-TEX mitten shells.

Beyond directly protecting your hands you must manage depletion of thermal energy. Cold hands in snow blowing (and diving) often stem from a cooling body. Warm body, warm blood, warm hands (feet too). This in part probably explains how you have less of a problem if you stay out long enough to get the furnace heated up.

Wear a good base layer that will wick moisture from your body. A nice expedition weight set is wonderful. Wear good socks, I like merino wool, it wicks and is exothermic, and of course decent boots. I have not needed the type with heavy felt liners but they are certainly warm. For comfort I go with a fleece middle layer. It may not be the best choice but it works for me. Then it's a farmer John and parka set as an outer shell. Finally ear plugs, balaclava and a mad bomber cap. I'm out for 2-3.5 hours usually in the 10F range and come in warm all over.

If it's a mild rainy end of storm situation I go with a rain suit for the outer shell. The base layer and fleece is plenty of insulation over 32F.
 

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I am not a doctor and I was not kidding about trying the heated gloves. I destroyed my left elbow in a hiking accident. 6 1/2 hours in surgery I woke up with a lot of metal and the ulnar nerve transposed to a new spot in my arm. Cold and vibration are excruciating at times. I tried a set of battery heated gloves I found on eBay and they work to both keep my hands warm and they are thick enough to dampen the vibration a bit.
 

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Wear a good hat, and keep your core warm. It sounds like you are under-dressed when you first go out, and it takes some work to get your body heat elevated. Consider going with an extra layer or two when you start out, and shed one as you get close to too warm and perspiration.

A bare head sheds a lot of heat. When too much leaves, the body starts redirecting more warm blood flow to your head to keep the brain warm. The extremeties suffer. The range of hat options is pretty broad. Depending on cold and wind, I may or may not put a ball cap on first. If it's cold and windy enough to deserve face covering, a good balaclava-style head cover is a good idea. Else a knit cap over the ball cap, and ear protection over that. I can pull the large jacket hood up over that whole show if I need more. Tight warp-around sunglasses always, different color for bright light vs flat light (dark vs yellow). Goggles if it's cold and blowing hard. Bottom line is that a warm core and a well-protected head will keep your hands warm nicely.

In your gloves, add a waterproof layer. I usually put a pair of thin nitrile gloves on before the work gloves. It adds a layer of insulation, and keeps me from sweating up the outer gloves. Even mildly wet gloves lose there insulating ability pretty fast. Gore-Tex liners help, but protecting the gloves from sweat pays off in both heat retention and "dry time" between uses. Gloves will get a little funky given half a chance.

**** Not an MD.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
when I'm blowing I wear my bibs, a long sleeve t-shirt, a hoodie, and a hat with ear flaps, and some insulated gloves.
 

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I was out shoveling this morning is similar layers, 15ºF, dark and no wind. Shoveling is two-layers-less than following the machine at least for me. I was in a short-sleeve T, a long-sleeve T, a hoodie, and a wind jacket. Ballcap, knit cap, glasses, and the hoodie hood up or down depending on how much work I was doing. Two thermal layers and jeans, 1 layer of wool socks, 5" insulated snow boots, insulated work gloves, no neoprene liners.
 
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