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so , i never had to look at cold ratings in new zealand , i now move to canada and all of a sudden , it matters ,,, what can i buy that works well in lower temps , not just for snow blowers but for all like hinges on doors and pivoting bits on cars like windsheild wiper arms , ... i have tried lithium grease but at -20 it kinda gums up .... so im asking , for reccomendations for ... grease and spray on lube for colder weather climates please ,, i can google it , but im after real world , what works and what doesnt work as advertised .
cheers
 

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Anything synthetic, I also use a graphite paste called Never-Seize for certain applications.

You should be using exclusively syn oil. So much better and doesn't thicken, rises to the top of the engine faster.

Teflon sprays are good though can get waxy thus thick. Valvoline use to make a synthetic spray called Syn-Power, it's been rebranded under the Liquid Wrench name.
 

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I use synthetic oil, and I use snowmobile grease. From doing some reading a while back, it seemed like a good choice, due to being waterproof, and intended for use in cold weather.

Welcome to the forum, and I hope you enjoy Canada! I'm guessing it's a significant change from New Zealand.
 

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I use a variety of lubricants for different purposes, but for your question I'll stick to grease. Keep in mind that grease contains a) at least 70% base oil lubricant, b) up to 30% thickener and c) some proprietary additives. There's a mix and match of the combinations. So, lithium (in your example) is the thickener and can be used with many base lubricants such as synthetic oil.

Like the previous posting, I suggest synthetic as a base lube because of it's ability to withstand low temperatures.

Unlike base oils, which are interchangeable, thickeners are not always interchangeable. Thus, if an application is presently treated with one type of base grease another base may not be compatible and should not be used.

This is a long-winded way of saying use a synthetic lube but be careful about the base when used in equipment. Try to use the base recommended by the manufacturer. If that can't be done (perhaps because instructions are not available) use either a lithium complex or calcium based grease. Avoid aluminum.

One last point, visit a local auto parts store and find out what's used in your area.
 
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