Snowblower Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
15-20 years ago I did a winter test in temperatures of 0°-5°F. I left 3 quarts of oil outside for several days and then opened them pouring the oil in to a container to see how thick each of these oils were.

For comparison, I left 1 quart of synthetic oil in the house and 2 quarts of synthetic oil and 1 quart of Dino oil outside.

Outside I left 0w30 and 10w30 synthetic oil; and if my memory serves me correctly 5w30 of Dino oil. I expected the Dino oil to be the thickest, and it was, poured slightly less thick as honey. However ALL the synthetics poured like water (not quite) but it didn't matter, 0w or 10w outside oil, inside oil or outside oil, they all poured the same, I did not notice any difference. This is why for a snowblower, it doesn't make any difference. For a car, it does, as there are bearing tolerances, spaces, that the oil has to be a certain thickness to make it through at a certain rate. Now with winter coming, wait for the coldest days, do your own test.
 

·
Registered
Honda HSS724 & Honda HS720
Joined
·
135 Posts
This is informative. Better than all the oil debates/arguments/wars over at Bobs the Oil Guy.

I have been a long term proponent of synthetic in small engines. They are much more likely to get neglected and miss oil changes. Synthetic holds up to this neglect and harsh conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
This is informative. Better than all the oil debates/arguments/wars over at Bobs the Oil Guy.

I have been a long term proponent of synthetic in small engines. They are much more likely to get neglected and miss oil changes. Synthetic holds up to this neglect and harsh conditions.
The BITOG gang can beat a dead horse to death discussing oil and other topics. I'm a member on that site as well.

I've got Pennzoil Ultra 5w-30 in my Toro with the 10.5 hp tecumseh. I'm sure it will fire up right away on the coldest of days. This is my first year with this blower.
 

·
Registered
1977 Yard Man Snowbird 8/26
Joined
·
115 Posts
Unless it's a regional thing, my local Walmart stocks dino/synth blends, and straight up synth...no full-on dino any more. I'll use whatever my engine oil cap recommends as far as weight and viscosity goes. My engine made it to 45 years old by no mistake. Routine oil changes and using the correct oil type has a lot to do with it. Also, storing it in the garage helps a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
While "pouring" viscosity may be a useful characteristic of oil, it is only one of many. Synthetic oil may truly be better overall for an engine, but the pour test does not by itself prove that. That is the part of this constant debate that I disagree with.

I agree that proper engine oil maintenance is far more important than the oil type.

tx
 
  • Like
Reactions: WrenchIt

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
Regardless, you should always give an engine a few minutes to warm up under no load (perhaps at idle, if your carb isn't crippled) no matter what oil you use. I don't this startup lubrication is much of an issue, since there should still be enough in the bearings for the minimal time it takes any oil to get to them . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The pour test is important in cold weather, the faster the oil gets to the top of the engine, the less wear however with a splash dump engine it doesn't matter. I use synthetic in a snowblower engine only because it pulls easier for an easier start. If you are always using electric start, it doesn't matter. Leaving my snowblowers outside in the winter, I've never had a problem pull starting a 5hp using Dino oil, with a 8-10hp, with some engines, I've had a problem, for those I use synthetic oil.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nitehawk55

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
For the past 50 years I've only been using what the manufacturer recommended and have never had an engine issue so that evidence is good enough for me and I'll leave it at that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Regardless, you should always give an engine a few minutes to warm up under no load (perhaps at idle, if your carb isn't crippled) no matter what oil you use. I don't this startup lubrication is much of an issue, since there should still be enough in the bearings for the minimal time it takes any oil to get to them . . .
I hate that so many small engine devices do not have a throttle to idle things down anymore!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did this non-scientific pour test not as a lubrication test for snowblowers but as a pull test for snowblowers. It is easier to pull the starting cord using synthetic oil than it is using Dino oil especially with 8-10hp engines thus the faster pull makes starting quicker. With any sump engine, regardless of the oil used, the oil is there covering the main bearing journal, and having no oil passages through the engine, the oil does not need to travel, move. However, for car engines, I would always use synthetic oil instead of Dino oil because of the pour ability to travel to the top of the engines faster and sooner, besides squeezing in to the bearing journals faster. How fast? I've started car engines during the summer without a valve cover and it seems the oil is there at the top in 1 second. In the winter, I don't know, but synthetic is a better lubricater, slippery than Dino.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
yeah the pull start certainly seems easier with the synthetics. And I do need to stock up on some 5W30, any good sales out there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,748 Posts
Thats why I love using my kerosene fired torpedo heater to warm up anything I need to use in cold weather including my truck. I also used my torpedo heater to heat up my firewood processor for an hour or more before I started it when I was burning firewood as it had a 25 gallon hydraulic oil tank.
The torpedo space heater is especially a blessing before I start the truck as heating the engine and transmission up for an hour reduce the wear and tear upon start up and it barely barks when I turn the key as it acts like its 100 degrees outside.
I also melt off the salt, ice and snow from the snow blowers before I put them in the garage or melt the ice off the tractors. It's always a fight with the snow pups as they are constantly trying to get out of the garage and run in the yard and dig it up. It has gotten so bad lately I will probably have to replace the bottom panels of the garage doors as they have been digging at them to get out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
@paulm,

My last purchases of 5W30 Full Synthetic oil were at Tractor Supply, when the companies were giving something like $10 rebates on the 5-quart jugs, which were also on sale ... they usually run the sale at least once a year ... just grab some at Walmart until you catch the sale with rebate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,375 Posts
ahh, I remember you mentioning Tractor Supply, thanks. I shoulda bought when you mentioned the sale - nothing now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
Yeah, I buy it in the 5 quarts, as I work on a lot of machines .... you can get a 5-quart 5W30 Full Synthetic jug at Walmart for like 16 bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
I use syn 5/30 in my generator just for ease of pull starting in cold temps. For the snow blower I use syn 2 stroke oil but being a 2 stroke cold starts are very easy I use the syn for less deposits…..
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top