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my old tester ( 20 plus years ) gave up the ghost.

need new tester and would appreciate any recommendations for a reliable tester that won't break the bank.

thank you.
 

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I've got quite a few testers, mostly Snap-On........ But this is the one I use the most often. It has a small gauge and semi rigid hose that will not flop around while pulling on the 2 stroke weed wackers. I got it as part of a kit from OTC, but here it is as a stand alone unit. I'm sure they are available cheaper, although this is a decent brand and reputable seller.



https://www.summitracing.com/parts/lag-tu-21c/overview/

GLuck, Jay
 

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That Shankly looks a lot like my Harbor Freight tester that's maybe 10 years old. Though the Shankly includes a second hose and adapter than my HF did not, plus the Shankly has a case.

A leakdown tester would be a nice tool to have. How essential is the actual leakdown measurement/function? The gauge that shows you the percentage, I think it is?

It's occurred to me that sometimes a leakdown test is used simply to figure out *where* your small engine is leaking. When you pressurize the cylinder, if air is coming out of the dipstick tube, then it's blowing past the rings. If it's coming out the carb, you have a leaking intake valve, etc.

If that's a good bit of the benefit, then you can learn that by just supplying compressed air to the spark plug hole. You don't need the gauges, etc. Buy/make an adapter, etc. For instance, this shows how to turn a spark plug into an air-supply fitting:
https://www.powernationtv.com/two-minute-tech/2min-125/make-a-leak-down-test-tool
 

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That Shankly looks a lot like my Harbor Freight tester that's maybe 10 years old. Though the Shankly includes a second hose and adapter than my HF did not, plus the Shankly has a case.

A leakdown tester would be a nice tool to have. How essential is the actual leakdown measurement/function? The gauge that shows you the percentage, I think it is?

It's occurred to me that sometimes a leakdown test is used simply to figure out *where* your small engine is leaking. When you pressurize the cylinder, if air is coming out of the dipstick tube, then it's blowing past the rings. If it's coming out the carb, you have a leaking intake valve, etc.

If that's a good bit of the benefit, then you can learn that by just supplying compressed air to the spark plug hole. You don't need the gauges, etc. Buy/make an adapter, etc. For instance, this shows how to turn a spark plug into an air-supply fitting:
https://www.powernationtv.com/two-minute-tech/2min-125/make-a-leak-down-test-tool
The gauge is key so you don't over-react!! You're going to hear leakage but your ear won't be able to gauge how much is acceptable; you really need to quantify the pressure loss.
 

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Thanks. I haven't looked into them enough to know: how dependent are they on cylinder size, etc? Will you still get reliable readings on a small blower engine, vs something like a car engine (which, if I were to guess, is maybe a more common use for them)?
 

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Thanks. I haven't looked into them enough to know: how dependent are they on cylinder size, etc? Will you still get reliable readings on a small blower engine, vs something like a car engine (which, if I were to guess, is maybe a more common use for them)?
I've only used mine on small engines...never automotive. It is somewhat qualitative in that you should have a control or baseline (new or refreshed engine of similar build). That said, when you have a known-bad engine, you can quantify the improvement a valve job &/or new rings make.

IIRC, the instructions in my OTC tester recommend < =10% pressure differential.
 
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