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Is it a dual shaft engine. If it is that's a good reason to try and save it. Single ... not so much.

You can try to degrease it, sand the inside and outside some to roughen the surface up a bit for a good bite and then JB Weld it and you'd likely be good but there are so many cheap snow blowers out there it seems you could buy a repairable pretty cheap for the engine. If it's not a twin shaft, MY machine, I'd replace it.

Where are you located ?? Please add your location to your profile. It can make a difference on what options are available and you never know what someone might find for you on craigslist or have sitting in a corner and offer you if you're close. ;)
 

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JB Weld might work. Some people have done that. Some people have also had the blocks tig welded. There is also a product called aluminium brazing rod that is basically a stick of solder that you put on with a propane torch.


 

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I'm in Boston its a single shaft w/o pto
On closer inspection the crank race got smoked I did find a nice used short block but I hate to just trash it
Since it is a single shaft engine why not replace it with a Predator 212cc engine.
 

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If the journal on the crank is gouged it's scrap metal. Might want to save the carb and whatever you think might come in handy that you have room for but it's time for a different engine, sorry. :(
 

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That block is very salvageable, I've fixed much worse. The crank probably is too. They always look terrible, but I haven't seen one yet that was actually scored, the aluminum from the rod just transfers to the crank journal and makes them look that way. Clean it up with some fine emery cloth and chances are it'll come out just fine. Tap the block back into place, clean the paint off with a wire wheel and then some brake clean, apply JB Weld and put it back together.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That block is very salvageable, I've fixed much worse. The crank probably is too. They always look terrible, but I haven't seen one yet that was actually scored, the aluminum from the rod just transfers to the crank journal and makes them look that way. Clean it up with some fine emery cloth and chances are it'll come out just fine. Tap the block back into place, clean the paint off with a wire wheel and then some brake clean, apply JB Weld and put it back together.
Yes it looks like exactly that, aluminum from the rod. I guess there is no pressure on the sump side.
Funny that everyone recommended getting the chonda (lol) HF motor. As that's what I had said to him, next I knew he had done just that and gave me the damaged motor. This is all new to me and have to say I get great info here and hope others find it helpful. I did find a great deal on used short block and I'm in the process of moving parts over. Still not sure why one engine had a 1" output shaft and the other has 3/4". but all the parts seem to fit fine, the flywheel sits within just 1/8 below the threads on the crank
This is the good block, too bad my 10000 needs the pto this turned out to be a nice motor total invested so far $70
 

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Funny that everyone recommended getting the chonda (lol) HF motor. As that's what I had said to him, next I knew he had done just that and gave me the damaged motor.
It's pretty hard to beat those Honda clones, especially for the price. They're definitely a better engine than the old Tecumehs ever were. But that said you can fix a Tecumseh awfully cheap if you do it the way I said.

This is all new to me and have to say I get great info here and hope others find it helpful. I did find a great deal on used short block and I'm in the process of moving parts over. Still not sure why one engine had a 1" output shaft and the other has 3/4". but all the parts seem to fit fine, the flywheel sits within just 1/8 below the threads on the crank
The cranks are different based on what the OEM that was buying the engines wanted for whatever equipment they were were going on. There were a few different variants.

Also, the cylinder looks to be worn and scored in the old block, so while you can certainly fix it as I said, it's probably going to burn oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So this is great experience working with this 7hp, (fits nothing I have)
I get to do a dry run on this,
Getting up the nerve to fix my beloved 22000.
Image 2 is a better look at the 7's combustion chamber, I am getting conflicting info on honing out the the bore. Some say not to its bad some say just run the tool in and out easy as that. And back yard guy said just use some emery paper? What is the easy and inexpensive way that works
 

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Run your fingernail against those vertical scratches, can you feel them? If so it at the very least needs a hone, if they're deep enough it needs an over-sized piston and rings (which if I remember correctly are no longer available)

The cheapest/easiest way to do this is to get a cheap hone that uses sandpaper, put some 320 grit aluminum oxide paper on it. Then coat the cylinder with oil and hone it using an electric drill moving quickly up and down the cylinder bore.

Most of the time the original style rings for those older Tecumehs are no longer available so you'll instead end up with a new style piston along with a set of rings and a wrist pin. The last time I bought one they were about $30.

I'm guessing you've never assembled an engine before, when you do it put motor oil on the crank journal before you attach the rod to it, do the same for the wrist pin, cam and coat the cylinder before installing the piston. Also make sure the ring gaps don't line up, stagger them.
 

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Not that crazy. I had to compress the springs on a flathead Tecumseh to reinstall a valve. I didn't have a proper compressor, so I had to rig something up with a few flathead screwdrivers, a clamp, and I don't even remember what else :eek: It worked, finally, but it was way harder than it should have been.

I was definitely wishing for a real spring compressor! Good score.
 
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