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Discussion Starter #1
While preparing my snowblower for winter yesterday, I noticed 3 cracks in the plastic housing below the actual chute. There are no holes in the housing, just cracks. The plastic seems to be intact at the cracks, but I can move the pieces with my hand. Undoubtedly this happened last winter when the temp was 0 and the plastic was brittle. Just wondering if someone has a suggestion on a type of epoxy/glue, etc that will withstand the low temps and moisture that accompany snow blowing. The snow blower is a Toro 826 LE.

Many thanks....
 

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You might be able to "weld" it, type in plastic welding, there are quite a few posts on it. That might hold it until you find a used chute.
 

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hello blake, welcome to SBF!! you'll have to find out what type of plastic is being used to properly repair it, that I don't know but you should be able to find the right epoxy at hope depot or some place similar. I would reinforce the cracked plastic with some sheet steel or aluminum
 

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William, My snowblower is an 826 LE and it is 8 years old. Not sure I understand your reply? Are the numbers after the model numbers some type of plastic code?
 

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While preparing my snowblower for winter yesterday, I noticed 3 cracks in the plastic housing below the actual chute. There are no holes in the housing, just cracks. The plastic seems to be intact at the cracks, but I can move the pieces with my hand. Undoubtedly this happened last winter when the temp was 0 and the plastic was brittle. Just wondering if someone has a suggestion on a type of epoxy/glue, etc that will withstand the low temps and moisture that accompany snow blowing. The snow blower is a Toro 826 LE.

Many thanks....
better get that fixed under warranty there.
 

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William, My snowblower is an 826 LE and it is 8 years old. Not sure I understand your reply? Are the numbers after the model numbers some type of plastic code?
no the letters after 826 have nothing to do with the type of plastic toro used. the type of plastic ( abs or pvc or some other type of plastic ) use is important because if you use and epoxy and plastic of the same type the bond will be stronger
 

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Is there a lifetime warranty on this? If so, please advise who I contact to get this replaced.
I think early Toro plastic had a 5 year warranty. However I'm not positive so contact Toro for assistance.

USA 1-888-384-9939
Canada 1-800-544-5364
 

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I had the same happen on my toro. Tried jb weld and that didn't last. Too much snow banging on the area. Take a small drill and drill a small hole at each end of the crack. That will help it from spreading. Take a piece of paper and use it to make a template that covers your cracks. Then transfer that to a piece of sheet metal. After cutting the metal to size (dremel tool is great for this) bend it to fit over the area and pop rivit it in place. Stronger than new.
 

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I had the same happen on my toro. Tried jb weld and that didn't last. Too much snow banging on the area. Take a small drill and drill a small hole at each end of the crack. That will help it from spreading. Take a piece of paper and use it to make a template that covers your cracks. Then transfer that to a piece of sheet metal. After cutting the metal to size (dremel tool is great for this) bend it to fit over the area and pop rivit it in place. Stronger than new.
Thanks for the info. Did you put the sheet metal on top of the auger cover or inside? Just curious? I was thinking if I could put it in from the inside, it might last longer?
 

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I did it on the outside. forget what gauge metal I used but it came out great and solid I think with the backing support the metal gave to it, it will do just as well from the outside.
 

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Interesting conversation with Toro customer service today. Found out that the plastic warranty is only for 5 years... and I've had my snowblower for 8 years. The rep did tell me that the replacement part has a lifetime warranty and a different part number from the original. I inquired about the part number change and she indicated that the plastic was defective on the original part. I further pressed the rep and asked what was defective.. she said it cracks in cold weather!! No kidding!! I asked if there was any way to get the new part under warranty. She didn't budge. I will call back tomorrow and further press the issue.
 

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Never hurts to try. Did they by chance give a price on the replacement part? Maybe tomorrow you will get lucky and get a different person to answer the phone that might be more prone to make an "exception".
 

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Hey guys,

Since this seems to be the lower chute thread, any idea if Craftsman warrants its polymer parts beyond their standard 3 year warranty?

Mine is a 27" 2010 model and here is what my chute looks like after going through ice chunks mixed into the snowplow's bank:



Would hot glue hold up on this type of plastic? I have a feeling it would be too brittle but if anyone has an idea please share.
 

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Hey guys,

Since this seems to be the lower chute thread, any idea if Craftsman warrants its polymer parts beyond their standard 3 year warranty?

Mine is a 27" 2010 model and here is what my chute looks like after going through ice chunks mixed into the snowplow's bank:



Would hot glue hold up on this type of plastic? I have a feeling it would be too brittle but if anyone has an idea please share.
hot glue would not hold up to a good snow storm
 

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I doubt very much they are warranty covered for cracks . Your photo did not show but one material that works very well is sheetmetal tape, it is very thin metal tape approx. 2" wide with sticking glue on one side.
Once installed when pressed with a hard small round shape end like a pen, one can see the small imprints from the chute's plastic and you should put 2 or 3 layers. Just ask a sheetmetal shop for the stuff it works very well and tough.
 

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I doubt very much they are warranty covered for cracks . Your photo did not show but one material that works very well is sheetmetal tape, it is very thin metal tape approx. 2" wide with sticking glue on one side.
Once installed when pressed with a hard small round shape end like a pen, one can see the small imprints from the chute's plastic and you should put 2 or 3 layers. Just ask a sheetmetal shop for the stuff it works very well and tough.
Now that sounds like an excellent idea, thanks :)
 
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