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This was discussed a few months ago. Someone posted the wire trick but also screw or put a piece of threaded rod, stud bolt, bolt with head cut off in to the old and new fuel line hose then pull. I think this was the best idea posted l
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Yeah, especially when there are bits sticking out for it to get caught on... with the wire in place you should be able to wiggle on past. I've got some high-tension wire that's really stiff, good for the purpose. Great tip!
 

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I was the one who suggested the wire, and typically just use a coat hangar with the end folded over and crunched closed into a small ball so it isn't sharp. The key is to not damage the new line, or put stiff spots in that can't make turns, as might be the case with a bolt or some such.
 

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Multiply the job by 25x (or more)? Why in the world do that? My way is about 30 seconds, and you can't strip any srews. Not a fan of doing things the hard way at all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
<solemn voiceover>

And thus will the annals of history record the opening salvos of the Great Fuel Line Wars...

So I sallied forth armed with screwdriver and wrench... counted 8 bolts and various other stuff that would need dysmangling, deemed myself outgunned, and retreated from the field... it ain't just a cover. It's a cover to which are directly attached the gas tank mount, the recoil mechanism (integrated), and some wires and smaller bits. And even then you're not down to the level of the fuel line, which feeds through next to the bottom of the block. Well, in defense of whatever lunatic designed it, that IS the most direct route.

However, all is not lost! Upon polishing the area around the topmost bolts, I discovered the model and serial stamp:

143-804062 SER 9290 B
 

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Where are the pictures?

Maybe we can help you better with them. I've replaced many fuel lines on Tecumseh engines and never had to remove the cover. Remove fuel tank and carb and that's it. Can be done even with carb still in place, but might take more time if you don't get lucky first pull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Haven't had a chance to process pics yet, but on the third try found fuel line that works (1/4" yeah, but it has to be stretchy 1/4" or it doesn't fit... O'Reilly's Auto Parts to the rescue)... and after some poking around and comparing OD with the old line, which was already in there too tight, determined that even a full teardown wouldn't make new line fit in the same spot (well, maybe if you smashed the line flat). So wound up routing it around the recoil, where it's at the same height and out of the way, and fits very securely behind the little flange the pull handle seats into. (As a bonus, won't have a notch rubbed into it by a flange midway through the hole, like the old line did.)

So... engine's all fixed up, time to look underneath. Chain drive looks good. Further along, I see one belt, slightly loose. I see another larger belt wheel with no belt. I presume it's supposed to have a belt. I don't see an obvious place for the other end. Mighta just jumped entirely out of my depth here.
 

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Hi guys... someone gift me this critter, which supposedly was running a couple years ago. I think it's a model 536.885410, but can't find a model plate on it. I'll post pictures later but if I could find a repair manual that would help. Owner's manual gave me no joy, having no diagram of the fuel system. Or I missed it. (Craftsman 143.804062 Owner's Manual over on ManualsLib.) Any idea what year this might be?

I am not a mechanic, tho I can usually follow directions if you use very small words. :)

Anyway everything appears in good shape (other than being dirty from sitting outside) -- turns over easy, and everything is tight but not seized. No leaks or obvious wear or heat marks anywhere. Rubber all feels good. Gas tank looks solid, carb looks clean far as I can see through the choke. Seems like not many hours on it. Missing bolt on one blade, but that's easy enough to replace.

However, it looks like someone cut the fuel line. There's a soft skinny rubber tube (maybe half the diameter of a thin pencil) dangling in the air with nothing obvious to attach it to and a factory-smooth end, I have no idea what that is, unless it's a vent. There's also a stiff thick-walled rubber tube about the size of your little fingertip coming from the direction of the gas tank, and it would logically attach to a ribbed metal tube sticking out of the top of the carb, but it's been hacked off with about two inches sticking out. Is that where it attaches, and is it supposed to have a filter in-line?

Will be interesting to see if the tracks are better on my sloped driveway.... a blower with wheels was an Adventure best not repeated.

Thanks, all!
read some not all reply's, If your fuel line runs under the shroud It is not easy to pull threw , a push pull to get it to move BUT connect the new line to the old and see if you can push pull out, if you don't connect the lines and try to put a new one in it could get out of the track it rides in and get cut by the fly wheel. good luck.
 

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Run a wire through the old fuel line, pull it leaving the wire, and use it as a guide to get the new one in under the shroud. Makes the process trivial . . . .

Also, if the first line you mentioned comes off a cover on the side of the block, then it's the crankcase vent, and on older engines, does not connect to anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Haven't had time to work on the beast since whenever last...
Also, if the first line you mentioned comes off a cover on the side of the block, then it's the crankcase vent, and on older engines, does not connect to anything.
Ah, that must be the short hollow rubber bit that I can rotate but didn't seem to go anywhere. Thanks, solved the mystery. (I am not an engine maven.) The skinny line is evidently attached to the primer bulb.
If your fuel line runs under the shroud It is not easy to pull threw
Did get the old line out, but the space was smaller than the new line that fits the port. So it's now routed around the outside. And gas goes from tank to carb, so that much works!

However that's when I discovered that the carb bowl drain leaks (gas runs out about as fast as it runs in), which probably explains why the carb was not attached when I got it. The spring works fine, so must be missing a gasket on the inside. Haven't had it back apart yet.

Did get all the squirrel crud cleaned off and emptied out of the impeller (I swear someone must have used it to rake leaves... I actually use a lawnmower for that); turns fairly easy but with no wobble, so hopefully that end is good.
 

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MTD Dual Stage 31AE6B3H501 and Craftsman Dual Stage C950-52677-7
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When I did my mid - late 80's Craftsman I removed the guard over the carb, the electric starter, the pull cord mechanism (be careful not to damage your primer bulb tee) and it was mostly a straight shot through a little channel in there. I found it hard to find a line with a matching outside diameter but I found something close and with a little lube she slid right through. Also a good time to replace your primer line and or bulb. I might even have some pictures of the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Unfortunately not the case here... the only gas line I could find that fit the port was too big for the space (it's about 30% thicker than the old line, which barely fit). But around the outside is at the same height and as a bonus, isn't rubbing against a flange in the middle like the old one was.
 
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