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Discussion Starter #1
I changed the oil and plug, used 3-n-1 oil on the scraper blade, gear shaft, and other metal parts. Finally, I added a touch of Seafoam to the tank and ran it dry.

Three Questions:
1. The manual says to prevent gum from forming in fuel system or on essential carburetor parts, run the tank dry if it contains reformulated gas (gas blended with alcohol or ether).

I assume I have "reformulated" gasoline b/c it's pretty much impossible to buy anything without ethanol in it these days, at least in CT. I did what the manual recommended, however, would it be better to pour in some gas mixed with Seafoam for storage until next winter?

2. The manual also recommends pouring in 1/2oz. of engine oil into the plug. Why? Does anyone have any experience doing that?

3. Finally, when I opened the lower frame cover to lube the gear shaft there was a ton of black powder. I assume it was from either the auger belt or friction wheel rubber. Obviously I inspected them as best I could without removing them, they looked fine, do I have to be worried that they are wearing out? Should I replace them, they only have 2 1/2 winters on them?
 

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1. I use no gasoline additives in anything and always run them dry before putting them away.

2. The oil is to stop the inside of the engine from rusting. Pull the spark plug, put some oil in the hole, pull the rope several times, just be careful because it can spray out the hole. When you are done put the plug back in and pull the rope until it gets to the hardest spot to pull. This will have the piston at the top of the engine and both valves closed.

3. Sounds normal. Anytime you engage a stopped drive train or auger you are taking a piece of rubber at a dead stop and pushing it against a piece of metal spinning at full speed. There is always going to be a bit of slip as if you are spinning the tires on your car.
 

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i gave up using stabilizer in todays gas after it not working 2 times. never seems to work for me. i run it dry. the only other thing i do is that since i dont use stabilizer i pull the bowl off the bottom of the carb and blow it and the exposed parts of the carb dry.
 

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ps.... on a couple of blowers i have had to fix the friction wheel assembly was stuck in place. make sure to clean and lube the shaft it rides back and forth on. be sure to cover the friction wheel and drive plate.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Couple of questions.

1. I didn't blow the carb dry. I've never worked on a carb before. Is this something easy, or should I leave it alone?

2. How do I lube the friction wheel and drive plate? I really don't want to remove the belt.
 

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1. Pretty easy, but you can screw something up. If it is a Tecumseh you can remove the 1 bolt on the bottom of the carb to get the bowl off. If you are not careful you can mess up the float inside and you also have to put the bowl back on turned the same way. Just loosening the bowl nut should drain most of the gas out. Some bowls even have a drain on the bottom. Some even just have a spring loaded push button.

2.
this guy has lots of snowblower videos. You can probably search his videos for anything you want to know and find some videos on that topic.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I watched a few videos. In one of them it said not to get any oil on the aluminum drive plate or the rubber friction disc. Why not? I probably got some on the drive plate.
 

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I watched a few videos. In one of them it said not to get any oil on the aluminum drive plate or the rubber friction disc. Why not? I probably got some on the drive plate.
It will cause the drive to slip. Most of the videos also show him taking a rag with some gas and cleaning them. You can probably use brake cleaner or something else too.
 

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unless you work on them regularly , dont touch anything in the carb. use a marker and mark the outside of the carb body and fuel bowl. then remove the bowl, dump it out and wipe it out. then put it back on the way it came off line up your marker lines.

again,if you used stabilizer (seafoam) it isnt that important. i just havent had luck with stabilizers.
 

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Storage

There's a couple of different camps: use something like Stabil or Seafoam in the gas vs drain it out and run it dry. Each has arguments that stand up, so it's more a 'make up your own mind'.
If you have a metal gas tank, when it's empty there's more exposed metal to rust therefore it's recommended to use some form of gas stabilizer and top it off.
Another is ethenol based fuel can pick up more moisture while in storage than straight gas so some form of gas stabilizer is good.
Another is if you have a diaphram carburetor, leaving it without gas can cause it to dry out over time. That happens and you have a repair to do.
In the case of float type carbs, leave untreated old fuel in it and it can varnish up over time.
My lawnmower has a diaphram carb and I have 5 snowblowers with float carbs. I use Seafoam during the work season, when it ends then I drain the tanks and run them dry.

On adding oil to the cylinder, that's purely to help prevent rust when it's not being used. Lube it up, present the minimum amount of airspace for rust to start and keep a coating of oil on the cylinder walls etc. Another product that can be used is fogging oil, you spray it in the intake right before the carb runs dry and it's inhaled into the engine and coats everything and will ultimately stop the engine. It's designed to stick to everything it touches. The suggestion to get the piston at TDC is a good suggestion in my book. Another way to tell if you're at TDC is to put your thumb over the sparkplug hole and rope pull it till you have compression the put the plug back in.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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