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I just picked up an Ariens 932006 Sno-Thro that had been sitting at the curb for a couple of days. Hopefully I can get it into operational condition again.

It's definitely rusty and crusty. The discharge chute and throttle cable are rusted in place, for example. However, the engine is free and the wheels turn just fine. I can see a lot of bolts and screws will need to be soaked in penetrating oil before I try working on this thing...they are bad!

After checking the oil, I was able to get the shield off of the carb and blew some starting fluid into the carb. It was able to fire off for a couple of seconds, so that tells me the engine will at least run.

The electric start sort of works...it accepts power, but won't turn over the engine.

I figured at least this one wasn't going to end up in the scrap pile if I could at all help it.

Some pics:

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If you think it is worth it (if you retired and want something to do). I learned my lesson. Sometime it is better to buy than to fix. That snowblower is a lot of work right there. The cost and effort that you put into it might exceed its value. It is more than just a paint job. You will soon find things in it that need to be replaced. For the money that you are going to spend on it, you could have bought a much better snowblower that doesn't require as much work. It happened to me many times so I'm just telling you. The good thing is that Ariens used thicker sheet metals so, it is restore-able.
 

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That looks like a nice project to dismantle and restore. The older Ariens are a treat to work on. I would also get rid of the lawn tires and chains, and put a nice set of the XTrac Tires on it, as all the blowers have now a days.

Here is an old 10M4, which I put a new B&S on years ago, which I finally got around to a total dismantle, and bringing it back to mint condition:

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Discussion Starter #4
That looks like a nice project to dismantle and restore. The older Ariens are a treat to work on. I would also get rid of the lawn tires and chains, and put a nice set of the XTrac Tires on it, as all the blowers have now a days.

Here is an old 10M4, which I put a new B&S on years ago...
Thanks! Your project turned out very nicely!

The chains were the first thing to go as soon as I was done taking pics. The tires aren't in that great of shape either, so I like the idea of changing over to the XTracs. The tires on there right now are just tiny! Something like 4.00 - 8, I think.

I have a set of those XTracs that I need to install on my ST824, now that I think of it...once the weather gets hotter and they are easier to work with.

I do have a spare 5 hp Briggs sitting on the shelf that should work here if I need to use it.

This should be a fun little project...I don't know that I will restore it to all its original glory, but I will at least see if I can clean it up and make it functional again.
 

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For the small rims and tires, you should defiantly invest in one of those mini tire changers, like Harbor Freight sells … pretty cheap with a 20-25% off coupon.

Also make sure you have good tire lube and a heat gun to soften the tire, as it makes it much easier to work with.
 

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Yup, I have the HF mini tire changer already. Picked it up last fall for this specific job, actually.

I just have to figure out a solid place to mount the changer to so it isn't moving around when I am trying to work on the tires.
 

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I just mount mine to my workbench, or you could make a fold down table/shelf easily against a wall and bolt the base plate to it, and when you need it, just flip it up and insert the unit.
 

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For the small rims and tires, you should defiantly invest in one of those mini tire changers, like Harbor Freight sells … pretty cheap with a 20-25% off coupon.

Also make sure you have good tire lube and a heat gun to soften the tire, as it makes it much easier to work with.
The tire lube and heat gun ideas area both good. Thank you for the heat gun idea. How long do you hear it for, on high?
 

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I do use it on high setting, and each tire has its own time, depending on what time of year and tire condition/composition. Do Not over heat it, as you don't want to damage the tire. Common sense rules here … After doing a couple, you will get the hang of it. Between the heat gun and tire lube, they should glide right on … It is a little knack to it, but those mini tire changers are a must for small tubeless tire assembly's, unless of course you are using split rims with tubes. Also note, be very careful if using tubes with say checked tires that wont hold air otherwise, as it is very easy to pinch the tubes on these small rims if not careful. I also picked up some 90 degree (actually a little less) valves, and usually change them out if needed. Just be careful when pulling them in the rim with the puller that threads on the end, as because of the bend in them, it would be easy to damage. Again using some lube is recommended. And as always, make sure the rim is clean and straight, … I usually sand them down, primer and paint them.
 
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